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Current Fossil record News and Events, Fossil record News Articles.
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New species of dinosaur discovered on Isle of Wight
A new study by Palaeontologists at the University of Southampton suggests four bones recently found on the Isle of Wight belong to new species of theropod dinosaur, the group that includes Tyrannosaurus rex and modern-day birds. (2020-08-11)
Agriculture replaces fossil fuels as largest human source of sulfur to the environment
Historically, coal-fired power plants were the largest source of reactive sulfur, a component of acid rain, to the biosphere. (2020-08-10)
New study confirms the power of Deinosuchus and its 'teeth the size of bananas'
A new study, revisiting fossil specimens from the enormous crocodylian, Deinosuchus, has confirmed that the beast had teeth ''the size of bananas'', capable to take down even the very largest of dinosaurs. (2020-08-10)
New fossil discovery shows how ancient 'hell ants' hunted with headgear
A fossil recently recovered from the age of the dinosaurs is giving scientists the most vivid picture yet of how one of the most enigmatic and fearsome groups of ants to exist once used their uncanny tusk-like mandibles and diverse horns to successfully hunt down victims for nearly 20 million years, before vanishing from the planet. (2020-08-06)
Ancient mountains recorded in Antarctic sandstones reveal potential links to global events
A new analysis of sandstones from Antarctica indicates there may be important links between the generation of mountain belts and major transitions in Earth's atmosphere and oceans. (2020-08-04)
Disposed PPE could be turned into biofuel, shows new COVID-19 study
Plastic from used personal protective equipment (PPE) can, and should, be transformed into renewable liquid fuels - according to a new study, published in the peer-reviewed Taylor & Francis journal Biofuels. (2020-08-03)
Owl discovered that hunted like a hawk 55 million years ago
Paleontologists have described in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology a large owl that killed medium-sized mammals with its feet and claws some 55 million years ago. (2020-07-29)
Study sheds light on the evolution of the earliest dinosaurs
Geological evidence suggests the known dinosaur groups diverged early on, supporting the traditional dinosaur family tree. (2020-07-29)
Oldest South American fossil lizard discovered in Brazil
The animal was approximately 10 cm long and lived more than 130 million years ago in what is now the state of Minas Gerais. (2020-07-28)
Scientists prove bird ovary tissue can be preserved in fossils
A research team led by Dr. Alida Bailleul from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has proved that remnants of bird ovaries can be preserved in the fossil record. (2020-07-28)
Wrong number of fingers leads down wrong track
Have you ever wondered why our hands have five fingers while amphibians usually only have four? (2020-07-24)
What happens in Vegas, may come from the Arctic?
Ancient climate records from Leviathan Cave, located in the southern Great Basin, show that Nevada was even hotter and drier in the past than it is today, and that one 4,000-year period in particular may represent a true, ''worst-case'' scenario picture for the Southwest and the Colorado River Basin -- and the millions of people who rely on its water supply. (2020-07-22)
COVID-19 shutdown led to increased solar power output
As the air cleared after lockdowns, solar installations in Delhi produced 8 percent more power, study shows. (2020-07-21)
Arizona rock core sheds light on triassic dark ages
A rock core from Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona, has given scientists a powerful new tool to understand how catastrophic events shaped Earth's ecosystems before the rise of the dinosaurs. (2020-07-20)
ENSO influences trans-Pacific ozone transport from vegetation fires in Southeast Asia
Ding and colleagues revealed that the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-modulated vegetation fires in Southeast Asia, rather than fossil fuel plumes from China, dominate the springtime trans-Pacific transport of ozone across the entire North Pacific Ocean. (2020-07-16)
Decision support system within the EHR system can increase provider awareness of CKD
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects approximately 37 million U.S. adults and less than 25% are aware of their disease. (2020-07-16)
Growing up trilobite
If you've ever held a trilobite fossil, seen one in a classroom, or walked by one in a store, chances are it was Elrathia kingii, one of the most common and well-recognized trilobites. (2020-07-15)
Global methane emissions soar to record high
The pandemic has tugged carbon emissions down, temporarily. But levels of the powerful heat-trapping gas methane continue to climb, dragging the world further away from a path that skirts the worst effects of global warming. (2020-07-14)
Insights into climate change during origin of dinosaurs
An international team reveals discoveries about an unusual time called the 'Carnian Pluvial Episode,' a time around the origin of the dinosaurs. (2020-07-13)
Merging solar cell and liquid battery produces long-lasting solar storage
Combining liquid chemical battery technology with perovskite solar cells has led to a new record in solar energy conversion within a single device. (2020-07-13)
Biosignatures may reveal a wealth of new data locked inside old fossils
Step aside, skeletons -- a new world of biochemical ''signatures'' found in all kinds of ancient fossils is revealing itself to paleontologists, providing a new avenue for insights into major evolutionary questions. (2020-07-12)
Jurassic fossils from northeastern China reveal morphological stasis in the catkin-yew
Dong and colleagues studied well-preserved plant fossils from the Middle-Late Jurassic Daohugou Bed in eastern Inner Mongolia, northeastern China. (2020-07-11)
15-foot-long skeleton of extinct dolphin suggests parallel evolution among whales
A report in the journal Current Biology on July 9 offers a detailed description of the first nearly complete skeleton of an extinct large dolphin, discovered in what is now South Carolina. (2020-07-09)
First Alaskan juvenile predator fossil adds insight to dino migration
The discovery of the first juvenile dromaeosaurid lower jaw bone on the North Slope of Alaska supports a growing theory that some Cretaceous Arctic dinosaurs did not migrate with the seasons but were year-round residents, according to new research by SMU paleontologist Anthony Fiorillo. (2020-07-08)
Famous 'Jurassic Park' dinosaur is less lizard, more bird
From movies to museum exhibits, the dinosaur Dilophosaurus is no stranger to pop culture. (2020-07-07)
A tiny ancient relative of dinosaurs and pterosaurs discovered
Dinosaurs and pterosaurs may be known for their remarkable size, but a newly described species that lived around 237 million years ago suggests that they originated from extremely small ancestors. (2020-07-06)
Crystal structure discovered almost 200 years ago could hold key to solar cell revolution
Solar energy researchers are shining their scientific spotlight on materials with a crystal structure discovered nearly two centuries ago. (2020-07-02)
Amber fossils unlock true color of 99-million-year-old insects
A research team from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) has now unlocked the secrets of true coloration in the 99-million-year-old insects. (2020-06-30)
New extinct family of giant wombat relatives discovered in Australian desert
A giant marsupial that roamed prehistoric Australia 25 million years ago is so different from its wombat cousins that scientists have had to create a new family to accommodate it. (2020-06-29)
Tiny Japanese dinosaur eggs help unscramble Cretaceous ecosystem
A research team led by the University of Tsukuba excavated over 1300 eggshell fossils from the Lower Cretaceous Ohyamashimo Formation of Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. (2020-06-26)
No leg to stand on for Australia's flamingos
The sweeping pink salt lakes across Australia's interior are all that remain of the lush green places three species of pink flamingos once thrived the outback. (2020-06-26)
300-million-year-old fish resembles a sturgeon but took a different evolutionary path
A re-examination of a 300-million-year-old fish, Tanyrhinichthys mcallisteri, revealed that its lifestyle more closely resembled that of the bottom-dwelling sturgeon, rather than the stealthy pike, as was previously believed. (2020-06-22)
New Argentine fossils uncover history of celebrated conifer group
Newly unearthed, surprisingly well-preserved conifer fossils from Patagonia, Argentina, show that an endangered and celebrated group of tropical West Pacific trees has roots in the ancient supercontinent that once comprised Australia, Antarctica and South America, according to an international team of researchers. (2020-06-18)
First egg from Antarctica is big and might belong to an extinct sea lizard
An analysis led by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin has found that a mysterious fossil discovered in 2011 is a giant, soft-shell egg from about 66 million years ago. (2020-06-17)
Australian fossil reveals new plant species
Fresh examination of an Australian fossil -- believed to be among the earliest plants on Earth -- has revealed evidence of a new plant species that existed in Australia more than 359 Million years ago. (2020-06-16)
Seafood helped prehistoric people migrate out of Africa, study reveals
A study, led by the University of York, has examined fossil reefs near to the now-submerged Red Sea shorelines that marked prehistoric migratory routes from Africa to Arabia. (2020-06-16)
New fossil discovery shows 50 million-year-old Canada-Australia connection
The discovery of a tiny insect fossil in Western Canada is unearthing big questions about the global movement of animals across deep time. (2020-06-15)
Pandemics and the environment: China's COVID-19 interventions reduced nitrogen dioxide levels
A new Special Collection of Science Advances papers will delve into how pandemics such as COVID-19 affect -- and are affected by -- global environmental conditions, underscoring the interconnectedness of (2020-06-12)
Falling clean energy costs can provide opportunity to boost climate action during COVID-19 recovery: UN
A UN report says 184 GW of clean power capacity was added in 2019, a 20 GW jump from the 164 GW added in 2018. (2020-06-10)
New nanodevice could use solar energy to produce hydrogen
Amsterdam, June 9, 2020 - Solar energy is considered by some to be the ultimate solution to address the current energy crisis and global warming and the environmental crises brought about by excessive consumption of fossil fuels. (2020-06-09)
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