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Current Fossil News and Events, Fossil News Articles.
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Lichens are way younger than scientists thought
Lichens -- a combo of fungus and algae -- can grow on bare rocks, so scientists thought that lichens were some of the first organisms to make their way onto land from the water, changing the planet's atmosphere and paving the way for modern plants. (2019-11-15)
Water could modulate the activity and selectivity of CO2 reduction
A recent study compared the reaction mechanisms of CO2 hydrogenation over the stepped Cu(211) surface in the absence and presence of water by microkinetic simulations. (2019-11-14)
Climate impact of hydropower varies widely
Hydropower is broadly considered to be much more environmentally friendly than electricity generated from fossil fuels, and in many cases this is true. (2019-11-13)
Oldest molecular information to date illuminates the history of extinct Gigantopithecus
In the study, published in Nature, the team rebuilds multiple dental enamel proteins from an approximately two million-year-old Gigantopithecus molar fossil. (2019-11-13)
First evidence of feathered polar dinosaurs found in Australia
A cache of 118 million-year-old fossilized dinosaur and bird feathers has been recovered from an ancient lake deposit that once lay beyond the southern polar circle. (2019-11-12)
New fossil pushes back physical evidence of insect pollination to 99 million years ago
A study co-led by researchers at Indiana University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has pushed back the first-known physical evidence of insect flower pollination to 99 million years ago, during the mid-Cretaceous period. (2019-11-11)
Arctic shifts to a carbon source due to winter soil emissions
A NASA-funded study suggests winter carbon emissions in the Arctic may be adding more carbon into the atmosphere each year than is taken up by Arctic vegetation, marking a stark reversal for a region that has captured and stored carbon for tens of thousands of years. (2019-11-08)
New sphenisciform fossil further resolves bauplan of extinct giant penguins
New Zealand is a key area for understanding the diversity of the extinct penguins and has even revealed the existence of 'giant' penguin species (larger than living penguins). (2019-11-08)
Early dispersal for quadrupedal cetaceans: amphibious whale from middle Eocene
Lead author, Olivier Lambert, Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Bruxelles, Belgium, presented the team's findings at this year's annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology held this year in Brisbane, Australia. (2019-11-08)
Exceptional fossils may need a breath of air to form
New research led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that a long held belief by paleontologists about the fossilization process may be wrong. (2019-11-06)
The genetic imprint of Palaeolithic has been detected in North African populations
Researchers led by David Comas for the first time performed an analysis of the complete genome of the population of North Africa. (2019-11-06)
Carbon dioxide capture and use could become big business
Capturing carbon dioxide and turning it into commercial products, such as fuels or construction materials, could become a new global industry, according to a study by researchers from UCLA, the University of Oxford and five other institutions. (2019-11-06)
Ancient rhinos roamed the Yukon
Paleontologists have used modern tools to identify the origins of a few fragments of teeth found more than four decades ago by a schoolteacher in the Yukon. (2019-10-31)
Preserved pollen tells the history of floodplains
Fossil pollen can help reconstruct the past and predict the future. (2019-10-30)
Using renewable electricity for industrial hydrogenation reactions
The University of Pittsburgh's James McKone's research on using renewable electricity for industrial hydrogenation reactions is featured in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A's Emerging Investigators special issue. (2019-10-29)
Stanford study casts doubt on carbon capture
Current approaches to carbon capture can increase air pollution and are not efficient at reducing carbon in the atmosphere, according to research from Mark Z. (2019-10-25)
Strong winter dust storms may have caused the collapse of the Akkadian Empire
Fossil coral records provide new evidence that frequent winter shamals, or dust storms, and a prolonged cold winter season contributed to the collapse of the ancient Akkadian Empire in Mesopotamia. (2019-10-24)
New Colorado fossil record documents life's rebound after Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction
Nearly 66 million years ago, the reign of dinosaurs ended and the ascendency of mammals on Earth began. (2019-10-24)
The earliest well-preserved tetrapod may never have left the water
Superbly preserved fossils from Russia, excavated with support of a grant from the National Geographic Society and described today by an international team in the leading scientific journal Nature, cast new and surprising light on one of the earliest tetrapods -- the group of animals that made the evolutionary transition from water to land and ultimately became the ancestors not just of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, but of ourselves. (2019-10-23)
All plastic waste could become new, high-quality plastic through advanced steam cracking
A research group at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has developed an efficient process for breaking down any plastic waste to a molecular level. (2019-10-18)
US green economy worth $1.3 trillion per year, but new policies needed to maintain growth
The US green economy is estimated to generate over $1.3 trillion in revenue per year, representing 16.5% of the global green economy, according to a new study by UCL. (2019-10-15)
Searching for water
What does the presence of 1,000 year old water mean for the future of water supplies under the desert regions of Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Jordan, Oman, Yemen and the United Arab Emirates? (2019-10-15)
Early humans evolved in ecosystems unlike any found today
To understand the environmental pressures that shaped human evolution, scientists must reconstruct the ecosystems in which they lived. (2019-10-07)
Paleontology: New Australian pterosaur may have survived the longest
The discovery of a previously unknown species of pterosaur, which may have persisted as late as the Turonian period (90-93 million years ago), is reported in Scientific Reports this week. (2019-10-03)
Fossil fish gives new insights into the evolution
An international research team led by Giuseppe Marramà from the Institute of Paleontology of the University of Vienna discovered a new and well-preserved fossil stingray with an exceptional anatomy, which greatly differs from living species. (2019-10-02)
Seagrass meadows harbor wildlife for centuries, highlighting need for conservation
Seagrass meadows put down deep roots, persisting in the same spot for hundreds and possibly thousands of years, a new study shows. (2019-10-02)
What did ancient crocodiles eat? Study says as much as a snout can grab
To study the diet of ancient crocodiles, two researchers--one from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and one from Stony Brook University--combined mathematical analyses of the animals' shapes, surveys of modern crocodiles' diet, modeling methods for reconstructing the diet of fossil groups, and forensic-style interpretations of damaged bones from the distant past. (2019-09-30)
Dishing the dirt on an early man cave
Fossil animal droppings, charcoal from ancient fires and bone fragments litter the ground of one of the world's most important human evolution sites, new research reveals. (2019-09-26)
What color were fossil animals?
Dr. Michael Pittman of the Vertebrate Palaeontology Laboratory, Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong Kong led an international study with his PhD student Mr. (2019-09-23)
Coral reefs and squat lobsters flourished 150 million years ago
An amazing trove of 150 million-year-old coral reef fossils from eastern Austria -- at the time a shallow sea -- provides a snapshot of a diverse and thriving community of creatures, including 53 species of squat lobsters. (2019-09-18)
Cutting emissions gradually will avert sudden jump in warming
Steadily reducing fossil fuel emissions over coming years will prevent millions of premature deaths and help avoid the worst of climate change without causing a large spike in short-term warming that some studies predict, new analysis from Duke University and the University of Leeds finds. (2019-09-18)
Rare 10 million-year-old fossil unearths new view of human evolution
Near an old mining town in Central Europe, known for its picturesque turquoise-blue quarry water, lay Rudapithecus. (2019-09-17)
Scientists discover one of world's oldest bird species in Waipara, New Zealand
The ancestor of some of the largest flying birds ever has been found in Waipara, New Zealand. (2019-09-17)
Ancient Australia was home to strange marsupial giants, some weighing over 1,000 kg
Palorchestid marsupials, an extinct group of Australian megafauna, had strange bodies and lifestyles unlike any living species, according to a study released Sept. (2019-09-13)
Mysterious Jurassic crocodile identified 250 years after fossil find
A prehistoric crocodile that lived around 180 million years ago has been identified -- almost 250 years after the discovery of it fossil remains. (2019-09-12)
'Game-changing' research could solve evolution mysteries
An evolution revolution has begun after scientists extracted genetic information from a 1.7-million-year-old rhino tooth -- the largest and oldest genetic data to ever be recorded. (2019-09-11)
Ground-breaking method to reconstruct the evolution of all species
By looking into fossil teeth from almost 2 million years old rhinos, researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Cambridge launch a new molecular method for studying the evolutionary history of fossil species dating back millions of years. (2019-09-11)
What the noggin of modern humans' ancestor would have looked like
Despite having lived about 300,000 years ago, the oldest ancestor of all members of our species had a surprisingly modern skull -- as suggested by a model created by CNRS researcher Aurélien Mounier and Cambridge University professor Marta Mirazón Lahr. (2019-09-10)
Death march of segmented animal unravels critical evolutionary puzzle
The death march of a segmented bilaterian animal unearthed from ~550-million-year-old rocks in China shows that the oldest mobile and segmented animals evolved by the Ediacaran Period (635-539 million years ago). (2019-09-04)
Evolution: Ancient teeth shed light on Miocene 'mouse' migration
A new species of prehistoric murine -- the group of mammals that includes mice, rats, and their relatives -- has been identified from fossils discovered in Lebanon. (2019-08-29)
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