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Current Fossil News and Events, Fossil News Articles.
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Coral reefs and squat lobsters flourished 150 million years ago
An amazing trove of 150 million-year-old coral reef fossils from eastern Austria -- at the time a shallow sea -- provides a snapshot of a diverse and thriving community of creatures, including 53 species of squat lobsters. (2019-09-18)
Cutting emissions gradually will avert sudden jump in warming
Steadily reducing fossil fuel emissions over coming years will prevent millions of premature deaths and help avoid the worst of climate change without causing a large spike in short-term warming that some studies predict, new analysis from Duke University and the University of Leeds finds. (2019-09-18)
Rare 10 million-year-old fossil unearths new view of human evolution
Near an old mining town in Central Europe, known for its picturesque turquoise-blue quarry water, lay Rudapithecus. (2019-09-17)
Scientists discover one of world's oldest bird species in Waipara, New Zealand
The ancestor of some of the largest flying birds ever has been found in Waipara, New Zealand. (2019-09-17)
Ancient Australia was home to strange marsupial giants, some weighing over 1,000 kg
Palorchestid marsupials, an extinct group of Australian megafauna, had strange bodies and lifestyles unlike any living species, according to a study released Sept. (2019-09-13)
Mysterious Jurassic crocodile identified 250 years after fossil find
A prehistoric crocodile that lived around 180 million years ago has been identified -- almost 250 years after the discovery of it fossil remains. (2019-09-12)
'Game-changing' research could solve evolution mysteries
An evolution revolution has begun after scientists extracted genetic information from a 1.7-million-year-old rhino tooth -- the largest and oldest genetic data to ever be recorded. (2019-09-11)
Ground-breaking method to reconstruct the evolution of all species
By looking into fossil teeth from almost 2 million years old rhinos, researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Cambridge launch a new molecular method for studying the evolutionary history of fossil species dating back millions of years. (2019-09-11)
What the noggin of modern humans' ancestor would have looked like
Despite having lived about 300,000 years ago, the oldest ancestor of all members of our species had a surprisingly modern skull -- as suggested by a model created by CNRS researcher Aurélien Mounier and Cambridge University professor Marta Mirazón Lahr. (2019-09-10)
Death march of segmented animal unravels critical evolutionary puzzle
The death march of a segmented bilaterian animal unearthed from ~550-million-year-old rocks in China shows that the oldest mobile and segmented animals evolved by the Ediacaran Period (635-539 million years ago). (2019-09-04)
Evolution: Ancient teeth shed light on Miocene 'mouse' migration
A new species of prehistoric murine -- the group of mammals that includes mice, rats, and their relatives -- has been identified from fossils discovered in Lebanon. (2019-08-29)
First human ancestors breastfed for longer than contemporary relatives
By analyzing the fossilized teeth of some of our most ancient ancestors, a team of scientists led by the universities of Bristol (UK) and Lyon (France) have discovered that the first humans significantly breastfed their infants for longer periods than their contemporary relatives. (2019-08-29)
A face for Lucy's ancestor
Australopithecus anamensis is the earliest-known species of Australopithecus and widely accepted as the progenitor of 'Lucy's' species, Australopithecus afarensis. (2019-08-28)
Researchers develop affordable, less intensive methane detection protocol
A new testing protocol that uses existing, affordable water chemistry tests can help scientists and regulators detect sites showing evidence of new methane gas leaks caused by oil and gas drilling, according to Penn State researchers. (2019-08-27)
Filter-feeding pterosaurs were the flamingos of the Late Jurassic
Modern flamingos employ filter feeding and their feces are, as a result, rich in remains of microscopically-small aquatic prey. (2019-08-26)
Amazon rainforest absorbing less carbon than expected
An international team of scientists, including climate scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, found that accounting for phosphorus-deficient soils reduced projected carbon dioxide uptake by an average of 50% in the Amazon, compared to current estimates based on previous climate models that did not take into account phosphorus deficiency. (2019-08-20)
New study: Fracking prompts global spike in atmospheric methane
As methane concentrations increase in the Earth's atmosphere, chemical fingerprints point to a probable source: shale oil and gas, according to new Cornell University research published today in Biogeosciences, a journal of the European Geosciences Union. (2019-08-14)
Scientists discover key factors in how some algae harness solar energy
Scientists have discovered how diatoms -- a type of alga that produce 20% of the Earth's oxygen -- harness solar energy for photosynthesis. (2019-08-13)
Researchers discover oldest fossil forest in Asia
The Devonian period (419 million to 359 million years ago), called the 'age of the fishes,' saw significant evolutionary progress in plants. (2019-08-08)
Fungi living in cattail roots could improve our picture of ancient ecoystems
Some fossil plants that lived in wetlands had fungi living in their roots, and others don't. (2019-08-08)
NZ big bird a whopping 'squawkzilla'
Australasian palaeontologists have discovered the world's largest parrot, standing up to 1m tall with a massive beak able to crack most food sources. (2019-08-06)
New wood membrane provides sustainable alternative for water filtration
Inspired by the intricate system of water circulating in a tree, a team of researchers led by Princeton University, have figured out how to use a thin slice of wood as a membrane through which water vapor can evaporate, leaving behind salt or other contaminants. (2019-08-02)
Ancient plankton help researchers predict near-future climate
Temperature data inferred from plankton fossils from the Pliocene, an era with CO2 levels similar to today's, allowed a UA-led team to rectify discrepancies between climate models and other proxy temperature measurements. (2019-08-01)
Whole-tree harvesting could boost biomass production
Making the shift to renewable energy sources requires biomass, too. (2019-07-29)
A catalyst for sustainable methanol
Scientists at ETH Zurich and oil and gas company Total have developed a new catalyst that converts CO2 and hydrogen into methanol. (2019-07-29)
Solar energy becomes biofuel without solar cells
Soon we will be able to replace fossil fuels with a carbon-neutral product created from solar energy, carbon dioxide and water. (2019-07-26)
Paleontology -- new light on cichlid evolution in Africa
A collaborative research project carried out under the auspices of the GeoBio-Center at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich has developed an integrative approach to the classification of fossil cichlids, and identified the oldest known member of the tribe Oreochromini. (2019-07-25)
World's smallest fossil monkey found in Amazon jungle
Some 18 million years ago, a tiny monkey weighing little more than a baseball lived in the Amazon rainforest, the smallest fossil monkey known worldwide. (2019-07-25)
Cosmic pearls: Fossil clams in Florida contain evidence of ancient meteorite
Researchers picking through the contents of fossil clams from a Sarasota County quarry found dozens of tiny glass beads, likely the calling cards of an ancient meteorite. (2019-07-22)
Jurassic fossil shows how early mammals could swallow like their modern descendants
The 165-million-year-old fossil of Microdocodon gracilis, a tiny, shrew-like animal, shows the earliest example of modern hyoid bones in mammal evolution. (2019-07-18)
Early mammal fossil reveals the evolutionary origins of having a loose tongue
Our highly mobile mammalian tongues, which allow us to swallow chewed food and suckle milk as babies, may have evolutionary origins in some of our most early mammalioform ancestors, according to a new study, which finds remarkably complex and modern mammal-like hyoid bones in a newly discovered 165-million-year-old mammaliaform species. (2019-07-18)
Canada's high school curricula not giving students full picture of climate change
Canada's high school students may not be getting enough information on the negative impacts of climate change, scientific consensus behind human-caused warming or climate solutions, according to new research from the University of British Columbia and Lund University. (2019-07-18)
Paleontology: New light on cichlid evolution in Africa
A collaborative research project carried out under the auspices of the GeoBio-Center at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich has developed an integrative approach to the classification of fossil cichlids, and identified the oldest known member of the Tribe Oreochromini. (2019-07-15)
Shifts to renewable energy can drive up energy poverty, PSU study finds
Efforts to shift away from fossil fuels and replace oil and coal with renewable energy sources can help reduce carbon emissions but do so at the expense of increased inequality, according to a new Portland State University study (2019-07-12)
Bird with unusually long toes found fossilized in amber
Meet the ancient bird that had toes longer than its lower legs. (2019-07-11)
Fossil fuels increasingly offer a poor return on energy investment
University of Leeds researchers have calculated the EROI for fossil fuels over a 16 year period and found that at the finished fuel stage, the ratios are much closer to those of renewable energy sources -- roughly 6:1, and potentially as low as 3:1 in the case of electricity. (2019-07-11)
The ancestor of the great white shark
Mackerel sharks are a group consisting of some of the most iconic sharks we know, including the mako shark, the great white shark and Megalodon, the biggest predatory shark. (2019-07-08)
Ancient molar points to interbreeding between archaic humans and Homo sapiens in Asia
An analysis of a 160,000-year-old archaic human molar fossil discovered in China offers the first morphological evidence of interbreeding between archaic humans and Homo sapiens in Asia. (2019-07-08)
Murder in the Paleolithic? Evidence of violence behind human skull remains
New analysis of the fossilized skull of an Upper Paleolithic man suggests that he died a violent death, according to a study published July 3, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by an international team from Greece, Romania and Germany led by the Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany. (2019-07-03)
'Committed' CO2 emissions jeopardize international climate goals, UCI-led study finds
To meet internationally agreed-upon climate targets, the world's industrial nations will need to retire fossil fuel-burning energy infrastructure ahead of schedule, according to a new study in Nature from the University of California, Irvine and other institutions. (2019-07-01)
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