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Current Fossils News and Events, Fossils News Articles.
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Finding a genus home for Alaska's dinosaurs
A re-analysis of dinosaur skulls from northern Alaska suggests they belong to a genus Edmontosaurus, and not to the genus recently proposed by scientists in 2015. (2020-05-27)
World's oldest bug is fossil millipede from Scotland
A 425-million-year-old millipede fossil from the Scottish island of Kerrera is the world's oldest 'bug' -- older than any known fossil of an insect, arachnid or other related creepy-crawly, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. (2020-05-27)
The oldest Upper Paleolithic Homo sapiens in Europe
A research team reports new Homo sapiens fossils from Bacho Kiro Cave, Bulgaria, that are directly dated to approximately 45,000 years ago and are in direct association with stone tools, the remains of hunted animals, bone tools, and personal ornaments. (2020-05-11)
Fossil reveals evidence of 200-million-year-old 'squid' attack
Researchers say a fossil found on the Jurassic coast of southern England in the 19th century demonstrates the world's oldest known example of a squid-like creature attacking its prey. (2020-05-06)
New ancient plant captures snapshot of evolution
Researchers have discovered an ancient plant species whose reproductive biology captures the evolution from one to two spore sizes -- an essential transition to the success of the seed and flowering plants we depend on. (2020-05-04)
New fossils rewrite the story of dinosaur -- and change the appearance of Spinosaurus
Scientists have long opposed the idea that dinosaurs lived in aquatic habitats. (2020-04-29)
Jurassic Park in Eastern Morocco: Paleontology of the Kem Kem Group
The Kem Kem beds in Morocco are famous for the spectacular fossils found there, including at least four large-bodied non-avian theropods, several large-bodied pterosaurs and crocodilians. (2020-04-23)
Studying pterosaurs and other fossil flyers to better engineer manmade flight
Pterosaurs were the largest animals ever to fly. They soared the skies for 160 million years -- much longer than any species of modern bird. (2020-04-15)
Researchers challenge accuracy of methods that analyze trees of life
When species under a taxonomic umbrella have faced forks in the road, leading to extinction or adaptation, the path taken has been difficult to follow. (2020-04-15)
New fossil from Brazil hints at the origins of the mysterious tanystropheid reptiles
A new species of Triassic reptile from Brazil is a close cousin of a mysterious group called tanystropheids, according to a study published April 8, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tiane De-Oliviera of the Federal University of Santa Maria, Brazil and colleagues. (2020-04-08)
In South Africa, three hominins, including earliest Homo erectus, lived during same period
Nearly 2 million years ago, three hominin genera -- Australopithecus, Paranthropus and the earliest Homo erectus lineage -- lived as contemporaries in the karst landscape of what is now South Africa, according to a new geochronological evaluation of the hominin fossil-rich Drimolen Paleocave complex. (2020-04-02)
Our direct human ancestor Homo erectus is older than we thought
A Homo erectus skullcap found northwest of Johannesburg in South Africa has been identified as the oldest to date, in research published in Science. (2020-04-02)
When three species of human ancestor walked the Earth
In a paper published this week in Science, an international team of scientists share details of the most ancient fossil of Homo erectus known and discuss how these new findings are forcing us to rewrite a part of our species' evolutionary history. (2020-04-02)
Oldest ever human genetic evidence clarifies dispute over our ancestors
Genetic information from an 800.000-year-old human fossil has been retrieved for the first time. (2020-04-01)
Homo naledi juvenile remains offers clues to how our ancestors grew up
A partial skeleton of Homo naledi represents a rare case of an immature individual, shedding light on the evolution of growth and development in human ancestry, according to a study published April 1, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Debra Bolter of Modesto Junior College in California and the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, and colleagues. (2020-04-01)
Six million-year-old bird skeleton points to arid past of Tibetan plateau
Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have found a new species of sandgrouse in six to nine million-year-old rocks in Gansu Province in western China. (2020-04-01)
In Earth's largest extinction, land animal die-offs began long before marine extinction
Because of poor dates for land fossils laid down before and after the mass extinction at the end of the Permian, paleontologists assumed that the terrestrial extinctions from Gondwana occurred at the same time as the better-documented marine extinctions. (2020-03-27)
International team discover new species of flying reptiles
A community of flying reptiles that inhabited the Sahara 100 million years ago has been discovered by a University of Portsmouth palaeontologist and an international team of scientists. (2020-03-26)
New feathered dinosaur was one of the last surviving raptors
Dineobellator notohesperus lived 67 million years ago. Steven Jasinski, who recently earned his doctorate from the School of Arts and Sciences working with Peter Dodson, also of the School of Veterinary Medicine, described the find. (2020-03-26)
Ancestor of all animals identified in Australian fossils
A team led by UC Riverside geologists has discovered the first ancestor on the family tree that contains most animals today, including humans. (2020-03-23)
Unprecedented preservation of fossil feces from the La Brea Tar Pits
A team of researchers from La Brea Tar Pits, the University of Oklahoma and the University of California Irvine report the first coprolites -- or fossil feces -- ever discovered in an asphaltic -- or tar pit -- context. (2020-03-19)
'Wonderchicken' fossil from the age of dinosaurs reveals origin of modern birds
The oldest fossil of a modern bird yet found, dating from the age of dinosaurs, has been identified by an international team of palaeontologists. (2020-03-18)
Ancient fish fossil reveals evolutionary origin of the human hand
An ancient Elpistostege fish fossil found in Miguasha, Canada, has revealed new insights into how the human hand evolved from fish fins. (2020-03-18)
Mysterious ancient sea-worm pegged as new genus after half-century in 'wastebasket'
Fifty years ago, researchers placed a mystery worm in a 'wastebasket' genus and interest in the lowly critter waned -- until now. (2020-03-17)
Giant clam shells: Unprecedented natural archives for paleoweather
A research team led by Prof. YAN Hong, from the Institute of Earth Environment found that Tridacna shells have the potential to be used as an unprecedented archive for Paleoweather reconstructions. (2020-03-16)
Dinosaur stomping ground in Scotland reveals thriving middle Jurassic ecosystem
During the Middle Jurassic Period, the Isle of Skye in Scotland was home to a thriving community of dinosaurs that stomped across the ancient coastline, according to a study published March 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Paige dePolo and Stephen Brusatte of the University of Edinburgh, Scotland and colleagues. (2020-03-11)
Half billion-year-old 'social network' observed in early animals
Some of the first animals on Earth were connected by networks of thread-like filaments, the earliest evidence yet found of life being connected in this way. (2020-03-05)
New tiny 44 million year old bird fossil links Africa and Asia to Utah
A new species of quail-sized fossil bird from 44 million year old sediments in Utah fills in a gap in the fossil record of the early extinct relatives of chickens and turkeys, and it shows strong links with other extinct species from Namibia in Southern Africa and Uzbekistan in Central Asia. (2020-03-03)
Novel photocatalytic method converts biopolyols and sugars into methanol and syngas
A research group led by Professor WANG Feng from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently developed a photocatalytic method for the conversion of biopolyols and sugars to methanol and syngas. (2020-02-27)
Rare lizard fossil preserved in amber
The tiny forefoot of a lizard of the genus Anolis was trapped in amber about 15 to 20 million years ago. (2020-02-27)
Early worm lost lower limbs for tube-dwelling lifestyle
Scientists have discovered the earliest known example of an animal evolving to lose body parts it no longer needed. (2020-02-27)
1 billion-year-old green seaweed fossils identified, relative of modern land plants
'This fossil is about twice as old as the oldest tree, or oldest land plants' -- Researcher Shuhai Xiao. (2020-02-24)
A salamander named Egoria: Palaeontologists identify new Jurassic amphibian
A group of Russian and German palaeontologists have described a previously unknown genus and species of prehistoric salamanders. (2020-02-19)
Reconstructing the diet of fossil vertebrates
Paleodietary studies of the fossil record are impeded by a lack of reliable and unequivocal tracers. (2020-02-17)
'Ghost' of mysterious hominin found in West African genomes
Ancestors of modern West Africans interbred with a yet-undiscovered species of archaic human, similar to how ancient Europeans mated with Neanderthals, researchers report. (2020-02-12)
Extinct giant turtle had horned shell of up to three meters
Paleobiologists from the University of Zurich have discovered exceptional specimens in Venezuela and Colombia of an extinct giant freshwater turtle called Stupendemys. (2020-02-12)
'Oldest bamboo' fossil from Eocene Patagonia turns out to be a conifer
A recent examination revealed that Chusquea oxyphylla, a fossilized leafy branch from the early Eocene in Patagonia, which has been widely cited as the oldest bamboo fossil and as evidence for a Gondwanan origin of bamboos is actually a conifer. (2020-02-04)
New thalattosaur species discovered in Southeast Alaska
Scientists at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have identified a new species of thalattosaur, a marine reptile that lived more than 200 million years ago. (2020-02-04)
One single primitive turtle resisted mass extinction in the northern hemisphere
Sixty-six million years ago, in the emerged lands of Laurasia -now the northern hemisphere- a primitive land tortoise, measuring about 60 cm, managed to survive the event that killed the dinosaurs. (2020-02-03)
How and when spines changed in mammalian evolution
Researchers compared modern and ancient animals to explore how mammalian vertebrae have evolved into sophisticated physical structures that can carry out multiple functions. (2020-02-03)
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