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Current Foster care News and Events, Foster care News Articles.
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Report looks to improve quality measures for medical care of homebound older adults
There are an estimated 2 million older adults who are homebound or unable to leave their homes due to multiple chronic conditions and functional impairment. (2020-05-22)
Quantum Hall effect 'reincarnated' in 3D topological materials
US and German physicists have found surprising evidence of a link between the 2D quantum Hall effect and 3D topological materials that could be used in quantum computing. (2020-05-18)
What we can learn from Singapore's COVID-19 containment response in primary care
Singapore, a global hub for international travel and business, was among the first countries affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-05-12)
Primary care practice transformation introduces different staff types
The Comprehensive Primary Care initiative was launched in 2012 by the CMS Innovation Center as a four-year multi-payer initiative designed to strengthen primary care. (2020-05-12)
Primary care case management among frequent users with chronic conditions
Case management is an effective, collaborative, and cost-effective way to help frequent users of health care services integrate all aspects of their care. (2020-05-12)
After cancer: The role of primary care in cancer survivorship care
Primary care physicians are treating an increasing number of cancer survivors, yet they have no clear guidance on how best to care for such patients. (2020-05-12)
The unexpected benefits of tailored exercise for aged care residents
Tailored exercise programs led by accredited exercise physiologists don't just provide physical benefits for residents living in aged care -- they improve mental wellbeing and social engagement, according to new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research. (2020-05-06)
Financial incentives boost doctor training in opioid treatment medication
Offering $750 to emergency medicine physicians exponentially increased those trained to prescribe buprenorphine. (2020-05-05)
Mental health preparedness among older youth in foster care
Researchers interviewed 17-year-olds in California foster care. The adolescents' use of mental health services is elevated, but not necessarily their confidence level. (2020-04-20)
Novel treatment, social services program improves outcomes for opioid-dependent mothers
A new study published in the April issue of the journal Health Affairs says that, since its inception, Project Nurture has helped to reduce the necessary placement of children in foster care by more than 8 percentage points. (2020-04-08)
Curbing the rising toll of adults with complex care needs
In an article just published in JAMA Health Forum, nurse researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) underscore that while responses to the problem have resulted in well-motivated innovations, an effective and actionable path for immediate and long-term remediation should encompass micro- and macro-level solutions. (2020-04-06)
Journal of the American Geriatrics society highlights 'ABCDs' of COVID-19 for older adults
The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) this week rushed to publication a special article describing critical points for combatting the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic for older adults and those in long-term care. (2020-03-27)
Leaving care of the children's home -- for prison?
When 18-year-old youths transition out of children's homes, what crimes do they commit? (2020-03-22)
SFU research uses simulation game to alter beliefs about poverty
In advancing research to tackle the problem of burgeoning global economic inequality, researchers at Simon Fraser University used a poverty simulation game called SPENT to foster greater understanding of what causes poverty and economic inequality. (2020-03-16)
Unexpected ways animals influence fires
Animals eating plants might seem like an obvious way to suppress fire, and humans are already using the enormous appetites of goats, deer, and cows to reduce the fuel available for potential wildfires. (2020-03-05)
Gulf coast mollusks rode out past periods of climate change
About 55 million years ago, a rapidly warming climate decimated marine communities around the world. (2020-02-10)
Brewing a better espresso, with a shot of math
Mathematicians, physicists and materials experts might not spring to mind as the first people to consult about whether you are brewing your coffee right. (2020-01-22)
New policy reduces anti-psychotic medications in foster children
Rutgers researchers have found that a Texas strategy to reduce anti-psychotic medication for children can serve as a model for other state Medicaid programs. (2020-01-21)
Climate (not humans) shaped early forests of New England
A new, multidisciplinary study by archaeologists, ecologists, and paleoclimatologists overturns long-held interpretations of the role humans played in shaping the American landscape before European colonization. (2020-01-20)
Innovation is widespread in rural areas, not just cities
Conventional measures of innovation suggest that only big cities foster new ideas, but a more comprehensive measure developed at Penn State shows that innovation is widespread even in rural places not typically thought of as innovative. (2020-01-02)
Biomarker may aid in determining treatment for cancer patients
A blood test revealed the presence of a biomarker that may offer insights into the survival rates of glioblastoma patients. (2019-12-09)
New ultra-miniaturized scope less invasive, produces higher quality images
Johns Hopkins engineers have created a new lens-free ultra-miniaturized endoscope, the size of a few human hairs in width, that is less bulky and can produce higher quality images. (2019-12-06)
Air pollution linked to higher glaucoma risk
Living in a more polluted area is associated with a greater likelihood of having glaucoma, a debilitating eye condition that can cause blindness, finds a new UCL-led study in the UK. (2019-11-25)
Contacts with primary care physicians did not increase after the Affordable Care Act
At the same time the Affordable Care Act increased the number of insured Americans, analysis of health care industry data shows a continued decline in contact with primary care physician services. (2019-11-12)
A national decline in primary care visits associated with more comprehensive visits and electronic follow-up
The number of primary care visits may be declining nationally, but analysis reveals that in-person visits have become more comprehensive and follow-up care has moved online. (2019-11-12)
LSU Health research discovers potential new Rx target for AMD and Alzheimer's
Research led by Nicolas Bazan, M.D., Ph.D., Boyd Professor and Director of the Neuroscience Center of Excellence at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, found a new mechanism by which a class of molecules his lab discovered may protect brain and retinal cells against neurodegenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration and Alzheimer's. (2019-11-11)
Consensus report shows burnout prevalent in health care community
Clinician burnout is affecting between one-third and one-half of all of US nurses and physicians, and 45 to 60% of medical students and residents, according to a National Academy of Medicine (NAM) report released today. (2019-10-23)
Subunit contribution to NMDA receptor hypofunction and redox sensitivity of hippocampal synaptic transmission during aging
The researchers examined the contribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits in the redox-mediated decline in NMDAR function during aging. (2019-10-14)
Imprinting on mothers may drive new species formation in poison dart frogs
By rearing frogs with parents -- or foster parents -- of different colors, a team from the University of Pittsburgh working at the Smithsonian in Panama discovered that behavior in response to color may be more important than genetics in the evolution of new species. (2019-10-03)
Study: Spend more on housing, teens in foster care are less likely to be homeless, jailed
New research: Spend more on transitional housing and teens in foster care are less likely to be homeless, jailed. (2019-09-18)
Kaiser Permanente reduces secondary cardiac events through virtual cardiac rehabilitation program
Kaiser Permanente has demonstrated promising results in reducing secondary cardiac events and rehospitalizations by creating a virtual cardiac rehabilitation program that fits seamlessly into patients' lives. (2019-08-28)
Support needed for foster carers of LGBTQ young people
Research shows that more support is needed for foster carers looking after LGBTQ young people. (2019-07-29)
Burnout symptoms associated with racial bias in medical residents
Mayo Clinic researchers have found an association between increased symptoms of burnout and heightened racial bias in medical residents. (2019-07-26)
Children in foster care removed from homes for parental drug use
A research letter analyzed federally mandated data on children in foster care in the United States to examine how many children entered foster care because of parental drug use during the 2000 to 2017 fiscal years. (2019-07-15)
Unprecedented display of concern towards unknown monkey offers hope for endangered species
A wild group of endangered Barbary macaques have been observed, for the first time, 'consoling' and adopting an injured juvenile from a neighboring group. (2019-07-10)
A structured approach to detecting and treating depression in primary care
A questionnaire-based management algorithm for major depressive disorder in primary care is feasible to implement, though attrition from treatment is high. (2019-07-10)
Nonphysician practitioners absorbing more new patient requests post Affordable Care Act
The advent of the Affordable Care Act has led to millions of new patients seeking primary care. (2019-07-10)
How primary care physicians can make Astana work
The Astana Declaration, adopted by the World Health Organization in October 2018, acknowledges the importance of primary health care to achieve better health outcomes globally. (2019-07-10)
More money, skills and knowledge needed for social prescribing to serve as route into work
A new report from The Work Foundation, Embedding Work and Related Outcomes into Social Prescribing: Overcoming Challenges and Maximising Opportunities, says social prescribing can be an effective means of integrating people into work. (2019-07-04)
What do sick kids really want in hospital?
Researchers at ECU's School of Nursing developed the 'Needs of Children Questionnaire' (NCQ), the first of its kind to measure children's self-reported psychosocial, physical and emotional needs in paediatric wards. (2019-07-02)
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