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Current Frogs News and Events, Frogs News Articles.
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A new Critically Endangered frog named after 'the man from the floodplain full of frogs'
A new species of a Critically Endangered miniaturised stump-toed frog of the genus Stumpffia found in Madagascar is named Stumpffia froschaueri after ''the man from the floodplain full of frogs'', Christoph Froschauer. (2020-05-25)
Waiting game: testing the patience of predators and prey
A new report from Kyoto University shows that freezing in action when a snake and frog face off is not about fear but rather a delicate waiting game of patience, with each animal waiting for and anticipating its opponent's actions. (2020-05-11)
Outsmarting the enemy: Treefrogs rely on illusions to find a mate without being eaten
Researchers at Purdue University have discovered that male treefrogs reduce their attractiveness to predators and parasites by overlapping their mating calls with their neighbors. (2020-05-06)
Amphibian study shows stress increases vulnerability to virus
Researchers found that wood frogs, known for their ability to survive being frozen through, are more susceptible to lethal ranavirus infections if they have been raised in ponds high in salinity from road deicer. (2020-05-05)
Palaeontology: Fossil frogs offer insights into ancient Antarctica
The discovery of the earliest known modern amphibians in Antarctica provides further evidence of a warm and temperate climate in the Antarctic Peninsula before its separation from the southern supercontinent, Gondwana. (2020-04-23)
Promiscuity in the Paleozoic: Researchers uncover clues about vertebrate evolution
By looking at the DNA of living animals, researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, alongside an international team of collaborators, have revealed early events in vertebrate evolution, including how jawed vertebrates arose from the mating of two different species of primitive fish half a billion years ago. (2020-04-20)
Coquí fossil from Puerto Rico takes title of oldest Caribbean frog
The bright chirp of the coquí frog, the national symbol of Puerto Rico, has likely resounded through Caribbean forests for at least 29 million years. (2020-04-07)
Surprising hearing talents in cormorants
The great cormorant has more sensitive hearing under water than in air. (2020-04-01)
How animals understand numbers influences their chance of survival
While they can't pick out precise numbers, animals can comprehend that more is, well, more. (2020-03-30)
Skulls gone wild: How and why some frogs evolved extreme heads
Beneath slick skin, some frogs sport spines, spikes and other skeletal secrets. (2020-03-23)
Zoology: Biofluorescence may be widespread among amphibians
Biofluorescence, where organisms emit a fluorescent glow after absorbing light energy, may be widespread in amphibians including salamanders and frogs, according to a study in Scientific Reports. (2020-02-27)
USU herpetologist reports surprising evolutionary shift in snakes
A multi-national team of scientists reports a case of a vertebrate predator switching from a vertebrate prey to an invertebrate prey for the selective advantage of obtaining the same chemical class of defensive toxins. (2020-02-24)
USask study reveals origin of endangered Colombian poison frog hybrids
The origin of an understudied hybrid population of poisonous frogs -- highly endangered colorful animals that live deep in the Colombian jungle -- is the result of natural breeding and not caused by wildlife traffickers moving them, a University of Saskatchewan (USask) study shows. (2020-02-18)
When frogs die off, snake diversity plummets
A new study in the journal Science, shows that the snake community become more homogenized and the number of species declined dramatically after chytrid fungus decimated frog populations in a remote forest in Panama. (2020-02-13)
The curious case of the disappearing snakes
A Michigan State University- and University of Maryland-led study featured on the cover of this week's Science magazine should sound alarm bells regarding the ''biodiversity crisis'' or the loss of wildlife around the world. (2020-02-13)
Physics of Life -- Lane change in the cytoskeleton
Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment. (2020-02-12)
Lane change in the cytoskeleton
Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment. (2020-02-12)
Study traces evolution of acoustic communication
A study tracing acoustic communication across the tree of life of land-living vertebrates reveals that the ability to vocalize goes back hundreds of millions of years, is associated with a nocturnal lifestyle and has remained stable. (2020-01-17)
Animals reduce the symmetry of their markings to improve camouflage
Some forms of camouflage have evolved in animals to exploit a loophole in the way predators perceive their symmetrical markings. (2020-01-14)
Team builds the first living robots
Scientists repurposed living frog cells -- and assembled them into entirely new life-forms. (2020-01-13)
Dial-a-frog -- researchers develop the 'FrogPhone' to remotely call frogs in the wild
Researchers have developed the 'FrogPhone', a novel device which allows scientists to call up a frog survey site and monitor them in the wild. (2019-12-06)
Record-size sex chromosome found in two bird species
Researchers in Sweden and the UK have discovered the largest known avian sex chromosome. (2019-12-04)
Researchers find striking variation in mechanisms that drive sex selection in frogs
Researchers from McMaster University have discovered striking variation in the underlying genetic machinery that orchestrates sexual differentiation in frogs, demonstrating that evolution of this crucial biological system has moved at a dramatic pace. (2019-11-19)
By cutting out one gene, researchers remove a tadpole's ability to regenerate
Tadpoles that can typically regrow amputated tails or limbs lost their ability to regenerate after researchers blocked the expression of a newly identified gene that is one of the drivers for this regrowth. (2019-10-22)
Poor water conditions drive invasive snakeheads onto land
In a new study published Oct. 21, 2019 in the peer-reviewed journal Integrative Organismal Biology, Wake Forest researcher Noah Bressman reported for the first time the water conditions that could drive snakeheads onto land. (2019-10-22)
First widespread chytrid fungus infections in frogs of Peruvian Amazon rain forests
University of Michigan biologists have documented, for the first time, the widespread presence of the notorious chytrid fungus in 80 species of frogs from lowland rain forest sites in the Peruvian Amazon. (2019-10-16)
Monkeys can also thank their body for vocal development, not only their brain
Development of vocal behavior during maturation is typically attributed to the brain. (2019-10-15)
Imprinting on mothers may drive new species formation in poison dart frogs
By rearing frogs with parents -- or foster parents -- of different colors, a team from the University of Pittsburgh working at the Smithsonian in Panama discovered that behavior in response to color may be more important than genetics in the evolution of new species. (2019-10-03)
Bats use private and social information as they hunt
As some of the most savvy and sophisticated predators out there, bats eavesdrop on their prey and even on other bats to collect a wide variety of information as they hunt. (2019-09-24)
Scientists solve lingering mystery of poorly understood frog
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at McMaster University, has solved a centuries-old mystery of 'Fraser's Clawed Frog', an unusual and elusive species found in West Africa. (2019-09-11)
Toxic frogs with weak defenses persist in the gene pool alongside stronger competitors
A multi-national team of evolutionary biologists investigated how two types of poison frog co-exist when we expect only one. (2019-09-02)
Gene regulation behind the choice of the correct receptor for olfaction
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have uncovered the genetics behind two distinct types of olfactory sensory neurons; the so called 'class I olfactory neurons' that has persisted from aquatic to terrestrial animals and the 'class II olfactory neurons' that only terrestrial animals possess. (2019-08-16)
World's largest frogs build their own ponds for their young
The first example of 'nest'-building in an African amphibian, the Goliath frog, has been described in a new article in the Journal of Natural History, and could explain why they have grown to be giant. (2019-08-08)
To learn how poison frogs are adapting to warmer temperatures, scientists got crafty
Strawberry poison frogs live in Costa Rican forests that are being cut down for farmland. (2019-08-02)
Eleven new species of rain frogs discovered in the tropical Andes
Eleven new frog species were described in the open-access journal ZooKeys. (2019-08-02)
UCF team discovers, names new frog species
An international team of researchers have identified and described two new frog species and have named one of them after a University of Central Florida professor. (2019-07-18)
Hear them roar: How humans and chickadees understand each other
Is there something universal about the sounds we make that allows vocal learners -- like songbirds -- to figure out how we're feeling? (2019-07-12)
Amphibians infected by ranavirus found in Atlantic rain forest
Ranavirus is linked to amphibian decline or extinction in other parts of the world, but in Brazil, it has been reported only in captive animals. (2019-06-28)
Skin bacteria could save frogs from virus
Bacteria living on the skin of frogs could save them from a deadly virus, new research suggests. (2019-06-21)
Artificial intelligence identifies 'kissing bugs' that spread Chagas disease
A University of Kansas researcher publishes proof-of-concept research showing artificial intelligence can recognize 12 Mexican and 39 Brazilian species of kissing bugs with high accuracy by analyzing ordinary photos -- an advantage for officials looking to cut the spread of Chagas disease. (2019-06-20)
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