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Current Game theory News and Events, Game theory News Articles.
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Large simulation finds new origin of supermassive black holes
Computer simulations conducted by astrophysicists at Tohoku University in Japan, have revealed a new theory for the origin of supermassive black holes. (2020-06-02)
Playing video games linked with unhealthy behaviors for college men
Results from a new study suggest that college men who play video games tend to exercise less and have poorer eating habits compared to non-gamers. (2020-06-01)
Study questions benefits of social networks to disaster response
Faced with a common peril, people delay making decisions that might save lives, fail to alert each other to danger and spread misinformation. (2020-05-28)
Multifunctional e-glasses monitor health, protect eyes, control video game
Fitness tracker bracelets and watches provide useful information, such as step count and heart rate, but they usually can't provide more detailed data about the wearer's health. (2020-05-27)
Climate change increases migration at the expense of the poor
A climate game developed by Max Planck researchers shows that global cooperation can be possible -- although not without effort. (2020-05-26)
How exposure to negative feedback in influences goal-directed consumer behaviors
Threats to self-esteem and negative feedback are pervasive in today's society. (2020-05-26)
Chirality-assisted lateral momentum transfer for bidirectional enantioselective separation
Chiral nanoparticles which twist the light were theoretically predicted to experience lateral forces perpendicular to light vector but lacks experimental verification. (2020-05-25)
A nice day for a quantum walk
Scientists at Osaka University initiated a quantum random walk by shining lasers on a row of trapped ions. (2020-05-25)
Global study confirms influential theory behind loss aversion
A new global study offers a powerful confirmation of one of the most influential frameworks in all of behavioral sciences and behavioral economics: prospect theory, which when introduced in 1979 led to a sea change in understanding the irrational and paradoxical ways individuals make decisions and interpret risk. (2020-05-18)
Is the simplest chemical reaction really that simple?
New research by scientists at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has shown, surprisingly, in the simplest, well-studied reaction, there is still uncovered mechanism. (2020-05-14)
Genes of high temperature superconductivity expressed in 3D materials
High temperature superconductors, in particular, those transition metal based ones, host quasi-two dimensional lattice structures. (2020-05-13)
Detecting dyslexia with interactions that do not require a knowledge of language
Dyslexia is a specific learning disorder that affects 5 - 15% of the world population. (2020-05-13)
Is video game addiction real?
A recent six-year study, the longest study ever done on video game addiction, found that about 90% of gamers do not play in a way that is harmful or causes negative long-term consequences. (2020-05-13)
UMBC gaming researchers develop a new way to render characters with realistic skin
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed a new solution to render an essential detail in many video games: human skin. (2020-05-11)
Waiting game: testing the patience of predators and prey
A new report from Kyoto University shows that freezing in action when a snake and frog face off is not about fear but rather a delicate waiting game of patience, with each animal waiting for and anticipating its opponent's actions. (2020-05-11)
Hydrogen blamed for interfering with nickelate superconductors synthesis
Prof. ZHONG Zhicheng's team at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering has investigated the electronic structure of the recently discovered nickelate superconductors NdNiO2. They successfully explained the experimental difficulties in synthesizing superconducting nickelates, in cooperation with Prof. (2020-05-08)
Deciphering the hidden interactions within biological networks of varying sizes
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba discovered that fish schools showed a significant change in behavior with varying school sizes. (2020-05-07)
'Terrible twos' not inevitable: With engaged parenting, happy babies can become happy toddlers
Parents should not feel pressured to make their young children undertake structured learning or achieve specific tasks, particularly during lockdown. (2020-05-06)
New freeze-resistant trichinella species discovered in wolverines
A new freeze-resistant Trichinella species has been discovered in wolverines by Agricultural Research Service scientists and their colleagues. (2020-05-06)
Evidence that human brains replay our waking experiences while we sleep
When we fall asleep, our brains are not merely offline, they're busy organizing new memories -- and now, scientists have gotten a glimpse of the process. (2020-05-05)
Considering how many firms can meet pollutant standards can spur green tech development
A new study developed a model of regulation in which the probability of a stricter standard being enacted increased with the proportion of firms in an industry that could meet the standard. (2020-05-05)
A new explanation for the origins of human fatherhood
The origins of paternal care, a key differentiator between humans and other primates, have long been tied to ancestral females trading their own sexual fidelity for food provided by their mates. (2020-04-27)
Quantum electrodynamics experiment
The fundamental laws of physics are based on symmetries that, among other things, determine the interactions between charged particles. (2020-04-24)
Your football team loses a match. You may suffer a heart attack.
Lost football games may trigger heart attacks in male fans, according to research presented today on EAPC Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2020-04-23)
Game theory suggests more efficient cancer therapy
Cornell mathematicians are using game theory to model how this competition could be leveraged, so cancer treatment -- which also takes a toll on the patient's body -- might be administered more sparingly, with maximized effect. (2020-04-23)
Study: Football offensive linemen should start plays upright to avoid hits to the head
Just a simple change to the starting stance of players on the offensive line in American football could significantly reduce hits to the head, a study conducted by Purdue University and Stanford University researchers now shows. (2020-04-21)
People may know the best decision -- and not make it
When faced with a decision, people may know which choice gives them the best chance of success, but still take the other option, a new study suggests. (2020-04-20)
How tiny water droplets form can have a big impact on climate models
Droplets and bubbles are formed nearly everywhere, from boiling our morning coffee, to complex industrial processes and even volcanic eruptions. (2020-04-16)
How expectations influence learning
During learning, the brain is a prediction engine that continually makes theories about our environment and accurately registers whether an assumption is true or not. (2020-04-15)
What is an individual? Information Theory may provide the answer
Despite the near-universal assumption of individuality in biology, there is little agreement about what individuals are and few rigorous quantitative methods for their identification. (2020-04-15)
UofL researchers describe possible mechanism for link between obesity and breast cancer
It is widely accepted that higher levels of body fat increase the risk of developing breast cancer, as well as other cancers. (2020-04-13)
Scientists use the Tokyo Skytree to test Einstein's theory of general relativity
In another verification of the validity of Einstein's theory of general relativity, published in Nature Photonics, scientists from the RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics and Cluster for Pioneering Research, with colleagues, have used two finely tuned optical lattice clocks, one at the base and one on the 450-meter observatory floor of Tokyo Skytree, to make new ultraprecise measurements of the time dilation effect predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity. (2020-04-09)
New measurements reveal evidence of elusive particles in a newly-discovered superconductor
Now a team of researchers at the University of Illinois, led by physicist Vidya Madhavan, in collaboration with researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the University of Maryland, Boston College, and ETH Zurich, have used high-resolution microscopy tools to peer at the inner-workings of an unusual type of superconductor, uranium ditelluride (UTe2). (2020-04-03)
Does relativity lie at the source of quantum exoticism?
Since its beginnings, quantum mechanics hasn't ceased to amaze us with its peculiarity, so difficult to understand. (2020-04-02)
Cocky kids: The four-year-olds with the same overconfidence as risk-taking bankers
Overconfidence in one's own abilities despite clear evidence to the contrary is present and persistent in children as young as four, a new study by the University of Sussex Business School has revealed. (2020-04-02)
New explanation for sudden heat collapses in plasmas can help create fusion energy
PPPL researchers find that jumbled magnetic fields in the core of fusion plasmas can cause the entire plasma discharge to suddenly collapse. (2020-03-30)
Video game experience, gender may improve VR learning
Students who used immersive virtual reality (VR) did not learn significantly better than those who used two more traditional forms of learning, but they vastly preferred the VR to computer-simulated and hands-on methods, a new Cornell study has found. (2020-03-25)
Scientists learn how vampire bat strangers make friends
Scientists haven't had a good grip on how friendly connections among strangers are made between animals -- until now. (2020-03-19)
Novel system allows untethered high-quality multi-player VR
Purdue University researchers created a new approach to VR that will allow multiple players to interact with the same VR app on smartphones and provide new opportunities for education, health care and entertainment. (2020-03-18)
SFU research uses simulation game to alter beliefs about poverty
In advancing research to tackle the problem of burgeoning global economic inequality, researchers at Simon Fraser University used a poverty simulation game called SPENT to foster greater understanding of what causes poverty and economic inequality. (2020-03-16)
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