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Current Game theory News and Events

Current Game theory News and Events, Game theory News Articles.
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Feeling depressed? Mahjong might be the answer
When it comes to boosting mental health among older Chinese, it might be as simple as a game of mahjong, according to a new study from the University of Georgia. (2019-09-17)
The market in your head
When bidding in a competitive market, our brains use a special type of heuristic to adjust the price depending on the success of previous attempts to buy goods. (2019-09-17)
Predictable esports: Amateurs and professionals sit differently in a chair
A group of scientists from Skoltech, the MIPT, and the State University of Aerospace Instrumentation in St. (2019-09-13)
Researchers and rats play 'hide and seek,' illuminating playful behavior in animals
Rats can be taught to play hide and seek with humans and can become quite skilled at the game, according to a new study, which presents a novel paradigm for studying insights into the neurobiology of playful behavior in animals. (2019-09-12)
'Ringing' black hole validates Einstein's general relativity 10 years ahead of schedule
For the first time, astrophysicists have heard a black hole ringing like a bell. (2019-09-12)
Predictable eSports: Amateurs and professionals sit differently on a chair
A group of scientists from Skoltech's Computational and Data-Intensive Science and Engineering Center (CDISE) won the Best Paper Award at the prestigious 5th IEEE Internet of People conference (IoP 2019) for their research in artificial intelligence which helped them find a connection between an eSports player's movements and skill level. (2019-09-11)
First 'overtones' heard in the ringing of a black hole
By listening for specific tones in the gravitational waves of black hole mergers, researchers are putting Albert Einstein's theories to new tests. (2019-09-11)
The ever-winning lottery ticket: Mathematicians solve a dusty mystery
After years of work, University of Copenhagen mathematics researchers have answered a mysterious half-century-old riddle. (2019-09-09)
Why should you care about AI used for hiring?
The Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology has published a new white paper that explores the hype and mystique surrounding artificial intelligence in hiring. (2019-09-06)
How do social networks shape political decision-making?
New research shows that social media's influence on voting goes beyond bots and foreign interference. (2019-09-04)
How 'information gerrymandering' influences voters
Study shows how information networks can distort voters' perceptions and change election results. (2019-09-04)
Skin cancer risk in athletes: The dangers of ultraviolet radiation
The dangers of ultraviolet radiation exposure, which most often comes from the sun, are well-known. (2019-08-30)
Providing a solution to the worst-ever prediction in physics
The cosmological constant introduced a century ago by Albert Einstein is a thorn in the side of physicists. (2019-08-29)
Physicists mash quantum and gravity and find time, but not as we know it
A University of Queensland-led international team of researchers say they have discovered ''a new kind of quantum time order''. (2019-08-25)
New study: Migrating mule deer don't need directions
Mule deer navigate in spring and fall mostly by using their knowledge of past migration routes and seasonal ranges. (2019-08-23)
Quantum gravity's tangled time
The theories of quantum mechanics and gravity are notorious for being incompatible, despite the efforts of scores of physicists over the past fifty years. (2019-08-22)
Black hole holograms
Japanese researchers show how a holographic tabletop experiment can be used to simulate the physics of a black hole. (2019-08-19)
Online brain games can extend in-game 'cognitive youth' into old age, UCI-led study says
A University of California, Irvine-led study has found that online brain game exercises can enable people in their 70s and even 80s to multitask cognitively as well as individuals 50 years their junior. (2019-08-19)
Lab-based dark energy experiment narrows search options for elusive force
An experiment to test a popular theory of dark energy has found no evidence of new forces, placing strong constraints on related theories. (2019-08-19)
Care less with helmet
A bike helmet suggests safety -- even if the wearer is not sitting on a bike and the helmet cannot fulfil its function. (2019-08-15)
Gamification can give dental and medical education a boost
Introducing gamification to medical and dental education can boost student motivation and lead to better learning outcomes, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. (2019-08-15)
AI used to test evolution's oldest mathematical model
Researchers have used artificial intelligence to make new discoveries, and confirm old ones, about one of nature's best-known mimics, opening up whole new directions of research in evolutionary biology. (2019-08-14)
Too much inequality impedes support for public goods
Too much inequality in society can result in a damaging lack of support for public goods and services, which could disadvantage the rich as well as the poor, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School, the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) and Harvard University. (2019-08-14)
Modern mating market values women more: Australian study
A new study by QUT researchers debunks some theories of sexual economics when it comes to the market value of women as they age. (2019-08-12)
A key piece to understanding how quantum gravity affects low-energy physics
In a new study, led by researchers from SISSA (Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati), the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Waterloo, a solid theoretical framework is provided to discuss modifications to the Unruh effect caused by the microstructure of space-time. (2019-08-08)
Digital games may beat mindfulness apps at relieving stress, new study shows
Digital games may relieve stress after a day's work more effectively than mindfulness apps. (2019-08-01)
What the brains of people with excellent general knowledge look like
The brains of people with excellent general knowledge are particularly efficiently wired. (2019-07-31)
Tiny bubbles hold clue to better performing industrial technologies
Insights into how minute, yet powerful, bubbles form and collapse on underwater surfaces could help make industrial structures such as ship propellers more hardwearing, research suggests. (2019-07-31)
A test of general relativity at the galaxy's center suggests Einstein's theory still holds
In a detailed study of a star orbiting the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy, researchers report that Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) accurately describes the behavior of light struggling to escape the gravity around this massive structure. (2019-07-25)
Underwater glacial melting occurring much faster than predicted
Underwater melting of tidewater glaciers is occurring much faster than previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at Rutgers and the University of Oregon. (2019-07-25)
How random tweaks in timing can lead to new game theory strategies
Most game theory models don't reflect the relentlessly random timing of the real world. (2019-07-24)
Astronomers make first calculations of magnetic activity in 'hot Jupiter' exoplanets
Signals from star-planet interactions tell of strong magnetic fields in 'hot Jupiters'. (2019-07-22)
Using visual imagery to find your true passions
You may think you know what you like -- how to spend your time or what profession to pursue. (2019-07-22)
School psychologists develop intervention to reduce hallway disruptions
A gamelike intervention developed by school psychology researchers in UT's College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences may help reduce hallway disruptions among elementary school children. (2019-07-22)
Self-injuring young girls overestimate negative feedback in social media simulation
Adolescent girls who self-injure feel that they receive more negative feedback than they actually receive, and are more sensitive to 'thumbs down' responses, compared to other adolescent girls. (2019-07-17)
Pokémon-like card game can help teach ecology: UBC research
Playing a Pokémon-like card game about ecology and biodiversity can result in broader knowledge of species and a better understanding of ecosystems than traditional teaching methods, like slideshows, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. (2019-07-17)
Win or lose: Rigged card game sheds light on inequality, fairness
Researchers at Cornell University are using a rigged card game to shed light on perceptions of inequality. (2019-07-17)
Community size matters when people create a new language
Why do some languages have simpler grammars than others? Researchers from the Netherlands and the UK propose that the size of the community influences the complexity of the language that evolves in it. (2019-07-17)
Chaos theory produces map for predicting paths of particles emitted into the atmosphere
Floating air particles following disasters and other geological events can have a lasting impact on life on Earth, and a new model drawing on chaos theory looks to help predict how these particles move, with an eye toward applications for geoengineering. (2019-07-16)
Army game-theory research better allocates military resources, fight cancer
US Army game-theory research using artificial intelligence may help treat cancer and other diseases, improve cybersecurity, deploy Soldiers and assets more efficiently and even win a poker game. (2019-07-15)
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