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Current Game News and Events, Game News Articles.
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Engaging undergrads remotely with an escape room game
To prevent the spread of COVID-19, many universities canceled classes or held them online this spring -- a change likely to continue for many this fall. (2020-08-12)
Young children would rather explore than get rewards
Young children will pass up rewards they know they can collect to explore other options, a new study suggests. (2020-08-12)
Cricket umpires fumble on T20 calls
Cricket umpires struggle to please everyone at the best of time but the different formats of the game make it even harder for them, especially when it comes to LBW decisions. (2020-08-11)
Using games to study law of motions in mind
At Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, researchers have successfully established relationships between games and law of motions in mind through analogy of physics and game refinement theory. (2020-07-31)
A conversation game may reduce disparity in end-of-life care for African Americans
A Penn State College of Medicine research team found that playing a simple conversation game may encourage African Americans to make plans for their end of life care. (2020-07-23)
Spider monkey groups as collective computers
New research shows that spider monkeys use collective computation to figure out the best way to find food. (2020-07-21)
Towards prosperous public goods with freedom of choice
An experimental game reveals that having the freedom to choose preferred public goods greatly increases their value by motivating more, and better, provisioning. (2020-07-14)
Links between video games and gambling run deeper than previously thought, study reveals
A new study suggests that a number of practices in video games, such as token wagering, real-money gaming, and social casino spending, are significantly linked to problem gambling. (2020-07-14)
Chinook salmon declines related to changes in freshwater conditions
A new University of Alaska-led study provides the first evidence that declines in many of Alaska's chinook salmon populations can be attributed in part to climate-driven changes in their freshwater habitats. (2020-07-09)
A memory game could help us understand brain injury
A Boston University team created a memory game for mice in order to examine the function of two different brain areas that process information about the sensation of touch and the memory of previous events. (2020-07-09)
Increased risk of injury in contact sports after prolonged training restrictions
Athletes who play contact sports are being particularly hard-hit by the prolonged restrictions imposed on games and training, according to a new study. (2020-07-06)
Researchers develop software to find drug-resistant bacteria
The program could make it easier to identify the deadly antimicrobial resistant bacteria that exist in the environment. (2020-07-06)
Study asks who's playing 'hard-to-get' and who's attracted by the ploy
Research just published in the peer-reviewed journal Personality and Individual Differences looks at the psychological underpinnings of making yourself seem more desirable by withholding obvious signs of romantic interest. (2020-06-30)
Uganda's Ik are not unbelievably selfish and mean
The Ik, a small ethnic group in Uganda, are not incredibly selfish and mean as portrayed in a 1972 book by a prominent anthropologist, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-06-25)
Getting real with immersive sword fights
Sword fights are often the weak link in virtual reality (VR) fighting games, with digital avatars engaging in battle using imprecise, pre-recorded movements that barely reflect the player's actions or intentions. (2020-06-23)
Researcher develops tool to protect children's online privacy
A University of Texas at Dallas study of 100 mobile apps for kids found that 72 violated a federal law aimed at protecting children's online privacy. (2020-06-23)
Faulty brain processing of new information underlies psychotic delusions, finds new research
Problems in how the brain recognizes and processes novel information lie at the root of psychosis, researchers have found. (2020-06-23)
'Game changer' for reporters: 2016 US presidential election coverage
The 2016 US presidential election is considered a 'game changer' for journalists covering the US presidential elections by causing them to dramatically reconsider how they view their role -- either as neutral disseminators of information or impassioned advocates for the truth -- according to researchers at the University of Missouri's School of Journalism. (2020-06-22)
Simulating cooperation in local communities
In new research published in EPJ B, a new simulation-based approach is introduced which could help to reduce the proportion of people who misuse welfare payoffs, through a cost-effective system which rewards individuals who use them responsibly. (2020-06-18)
US cities with pro sports see more flu deaths
Sports leagues may want to consider calling a timeout on reopening their doors to fans, based on new West Virginia University-led research that links an uptick in seasonal flu deaths to US cities with pro sports teams. (2020-06-18)
Envy divides society
Can class differences come about endogenously, i.e. independent of birth and education? (2020-06-17)
Using Jenga to explain lithium-ion batteries
Tower block games such as Jenga can be used to explain to schoolchildren how lithium-ion batteries work, meeting an educational need to better understand a power source that has become vital to everyday life. (2020-06-15)
New study finds surface disturbance can limit mule deer migration
Researchers used 145 migrations from 56 individual deer to examine disturbance effects at various scales. (2020-06-10)
Unexpected uncertainty can breed paranoia, researchers find
In times of unexpected uncertainty, such as the sudden appearance of a global pandemic, people may be more prone to paranoia, Yale University researchers suggest in a new study published in the journal eLife. (2020-06-09)
Many factors may contribute to steep, decades-long muskrat population drop
Muskrat populations declined sharply across North America over the last 50 years or so, and wildlife scientists have struggled to understand why. (2020-06-08)
Playing video games linked with unhealthy behaviors for college men
Results from a new study suggest that college men who play video games tend to exercise less and have poorer eating habits compared to non-gamers. (2020-06-01)
Study questions benefits of social networks to disaster response
Faced with a common peril, people delay making decisions that might save lives, fail to alert each other to danger and spread misinformation. (2020-05-28)
Multifunctional e-glasses monitor health, protect eyes, control video game
Fitness tracker bracelets and watches provide useful information, such as step count and heart rate, but they usually can't provide more detailed data about the wearer's health. (2020-05-27)
Climate change increases migration at the expense of the poor
A climate game developed by Max Planck researchers shows that global cooperation can be possible -- although not without effort. (2020-05-26)
How exposure to negative feedback in influences goal-directed consumer behaviors
Threats to self-esteem and negative feedback are pervasive in today's society. (2020-05-26)
A nice day for a quantum walk
Scientists at Osaka University initiated a quantum random walk by shining lasers on a row of trapped ions. (2020-05-25)
Detecting dyslexia with interactions that do not require a knowledge of language
Dyslexia is a specific learning disorder that affects 5 - 15% of the world population. (2020-05-13)
Is video game addiction real?
A recent six-year study, the longest study ever done on video game addiction, found that about 90% of gamers do not play in a way that is harmful or causes negative long-term consequences. (2020-05-13)
UMBC gaming researchers develop a new way to render characters with realistic skin
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed a new solution to render an essential detail in many video games: human skin. (2020-05-11)
Waiting game: testing the patience of predators and prey
A new report from Kyoto University shows that freezing in action when a snake and frog face off is not about fear but rather a delicate waiting game of patience, with each animal waiting for and anticipating its opponent's actions. (2020-05-11)
'Terrible twos' not inevitable: With engaged parenting, happy babies can become happy toddlers
Parents should not feel pressured to make their young children undertake structured learning or achieve specific tasks, particularly during lockdown. (2020-05-06)
New freeze-resistant trichinella species discovered in wolverines
A new freeze-resistant Trichinella species has been discovered in wolverines by Agricultural Research Service scientists and their colleagues. (2020-05-06)
Evidence that human brains replay our waking experiences while we sleep
When we fall asleep, our brains are not merely offline, they're busy organizing new memories -- and now, scientists have gotten a glimpse of the process. (2020-05-05)
Your football team loses a match. You may suffer a heart attack.
Lost football games may trigger heart attacks in male fans, according to research presented today on EAPC Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2020-04-23)
Game theory suggests more efficient cancer therapy
Cornell mathematicians are using game theory to model how this competition could be leveraged, so cancer treatment -- which also takes a toll on the patient's body -- might be administered more sparingly, with maximized effect. (2020-04-23)
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