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Current Gastrointestinal bleeding News and Events

Current Gastrointestinal bleeding News and Events, Gastrointestinal bleeding News Articles.
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Gut microbiota provide clues for treating diabetes
The individual mix of microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract provides vital clues as to how any future incidence of type 2 diabetes can be predicted, prevented and treated. (2020-07-13)
Towards improved wound healing -- Chemical synthesis of a trefoil factor peptide
The family of trefoil factor peptides brings hope to both research and industry to improve the treatment of chronic disorders. (2020-07-07)
Study: Surgical delay associated with increased risk in some gastrointestinal malignancies
Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, widespread cancellations of electively-scheduled or ''non-emergency'' operations were implemented to free up hospital beds and conserve protective equipment for health care workers. (2020-07-07)
New guideline: Don't routinely screen for EAC in patients with chronic GERD
A new guideline from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care, based on a rigorous systematic review of the latest evidence, found no benefit of routine screening for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and precursor conditions (Barrett esophagus and dysplasia) in patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (2020-07-06)
Pioneering brain haemorrhage treatment reduces long-term disability in premature babies
Premature babies with serious brain haemorrhage treated with a 'brain washing' technique pioneered by Bristol researchers have shown in a 10-year follow-up study, were twice as likely to survive without severe learning disability when compared with infants given standard treatment. (2020-07-04)
Artificial intelligence brings pancreatic cancer screening one step closer to reality
Lugano, Switzerland, 2 July 2020 - Artificial intelligence (AI) holds promise for enabling earlier detection of pancreatic cancer, which is crucial to saving lives. (2020-07-02)
Simple bed-side test detects bleeding risk in patients after surgery or major injury
A team led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital has developed a novel, inexpensive and portable device that can quickly and accurately measure the ability of blood to properly clot (or coagulate). (2020-06-26)
Study shows better option for treatment of inoperable anal cancer
People with inoperable anal cancer treated with carboplatin-paclitaxel had fewer complications and lived longer than those who received another chemotherapy that has been more often administered. (2020-06-24)
Using tiny electrodes to measure electrical activity in bacteria
Scientists at Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, have developed an organic electrochemical transistor that they can use to measure and study in fine detail a phenomenon known as extracellular electron transfer in which bacteria release electrons. (2020-06-17)
Vitamin D could help mitigate chemotherapy side effects
New findings by University of South Australia researchers reveal that Vitamin D could potentially mitigate chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis and provide relief to cancer patients. (2020-06-17)
RCSI researchers find potential new way to improve treatment for common bleeding disorder
Scientists have found a potential new way to promote blood clotting that could be used to help develop treatments for Von Willebrand Disease, the most common genetic bleeding disorder. (2020-06-11)
Female athletes at risk for nutritional deficiencies
Two decades of research among female athletes over the age of 13 years shows that a lack of nutrition knowledge about what they need to eat to stay healthy and compete may contribute to poor performance, low energy and nutrient intake, and potential health risks, according to a Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School study. (2020-06-09)
Happiness might protect you from gastrointestinal distress
Serotonin, a chemical known for its role in producing feelings of well-being and happiness in the brain, can reduce the ability of some intestinal pathogens to cause deadly infections, new research by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. (2020-06-09)
NAFLD in pregnancy increases risks for mother and baby
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in pregnancy has nearly tripled over the past ten years. (2020-06-09)
Deadly bacterial infection in pigs deciphered
New-born piglets often die painfully from infection with an intestinal bacterium. (2020-06-04)
Gut research delves deeper into obesity problems
Serotonin in the gut is considered a regulator of normal gut function and is an important driver of metabolism and metabolic diseases including obesity and type 2 diabetes. (2020-06-04)
What are the risks and benefits of low-dose aspirin?
Low-dose aspirin significantly lowers cardiovascular disease risk but increases the risk of bleeding, according to a review published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. (2020-06-03)
Syndrome linked to COVID-19 seems more common among children of African ancestry
An inflammatory syndrome in children and adolescents, believed to be linked to covid-19, seems to be more common among children of African ancestry, finds a small study from a hospital in Paris, published by The BMJ today. (2020-06-03)
Early treatment linked to reduced joint damage in young adults with severe hemophilia A
Children with severe hemophilia A who receive early prophylaxis are less likely to have joint damage in young adulthood than those who begin treatment later, according to a new study in Blood Advances. (2020-06-03)
Researchers find new way to detect blood clots
Researchers in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Texas A&M University are working on an entirely new way to detect blood clots, especially in pediatric patients. (2020-06-03)
New gut-brain link: How gut mucus could help treat brain disorders
Gut bacterial imbalance is linked with many neurological disorders. Now researchers have identified a common thread: changes in gut mucus. (2020-05-29)
Researchers examine data to identify optimal vasopressor treatment for rare type of stroke
Results of an Electronic Health Record (EHR) study assessing the most commonly used medications for raising blood pressure in patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a rare type of stroke, have been published in Neurosurgical Focus by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2020-05-29)
A comprehensive survey reveals bacteria are widespread in human tumors and differ by tumor type
Different human tumor types each harbor their own unique bacterial communities, researchers report in a new study that profiled the microbiomes of more than 1,500 individual tumors across seven types of human cancer - the most comprehensive tumor microbiome study to date. (2020-05-28)
Four of ten adults worldwide have functional gastrointestinal disorders
For every ten adults in the world, four suffer from functional gastrointestinal disorders of varying severity. (2020-05-27)
A single negative colonoscopy associated with long-lasting and significantly reduced cancer incidence
Having a single negative high-quality screening colonoscopy was associated with reduced colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality (by 84% and 90%, respectively) for up to 17.4 years. (2020-05-25)
Safety of bioabsorbable polymer against durable polymer DES in high-risk PCI patients
A novel study sought to reveal whether drug-eluting stents (DES) coated with bioabsorbable polymer (BP) presented a safety advantage without compromising efficacy compared to durable polymer (DP) formulations. (2020-05-14)
Peptides that can be taken as a pill
Peptides represent a billion-dollar market in the pharmaceutical industry, but they can generally only be taken as injections to avoid degradation by stomach enzymes. (2020-05-11)
Blood thinners may improve survival among hospitalized COVID-19 patients
Research could change standard of care protocols to prevent clotting associated with coronavirus. (2020-05-06)
Researchers find certain foods common in diets of US adults with inflammatory bowel disease
Foods, such as French fries, cheese, cookies, soda, and sports and energy drinks, are commonly found in the diets of United States adults with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a new study by researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2020-05-06)
Inhibiting thrombin protects against dangerous infant digestive disease
A new preclinical study by researchers at the University of South Florida Health (USF Health) Morsani College of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine offers promise of a specific treatment for NEC, a rare inflammatory bowel disease that is a leading cause of death in premature infants. (2020-05-05)
Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 infects cells of the intestine
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute in Utrecht, Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam, and Maastricht University have found that the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, can infect the cells of the intestine and multiply there. (2020-05-01)
Organoid models reveal how the COVID-19 virus infects human intestinal cells
A new analysis of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, reveals that the pathogen can infect and replicate in cells that line the inside of the human intestines. (2020-05-01)
Study finds highly elevated levels of fatty liver disease for 9/11 first responders
Toxin exposure appears to have contributed to dramatically higher rates of fatty liver disease among first responders to the attack on the World Trade Center on Sept. (2020-04-30)
Changes to gut microbiome may slow cancer growth in smokers
Changes to the gut microbiome interacted with the immune system to slow the growth of cancer in mice exposed to cigarette smoke, according to research that was selected for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2020. (2020-04-30)
Fecal transplantation improves outcomes in patients with multi-drug resistant organisms
Transferring fecal matter from the digestive systems of healthy donors to extremely ill patients who had previously been infected with drug-resistant bacteria resulted in shorter hospital stays, fewer bloodstream infections and infections that were easier to treat, according to research that was selected for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2020. (2020-04-30)
New model of the GI tract could speed drug development
MIT engineers have devised a way to speed new drug development by rapidly testing how well they are absorbed in the small intestine. (2020-04-27)
Soil in wounds can help stem deadly bleeding
New UBC research shows for the first time that soil silicates--the most abundant material on the Earth's crust--play a key role in blood clotting. (2020-04-27)
Is it bloating or is it a heart attack?
A patient in the hospital for metastatic Hodgkin lymphoma with significant abdominal distention displayed sudden onset of ST-segment elevations -- often an indicator of a heart attack -- however the heart attack symptoms improved when the cardiovascular care team pressed on the abdomen during a standard exam, according to a case published in JACC: Case Reports. (2020-04-15)
Identical mice, different gut bacteria, different levels of cancer
Some types of gut bacteria are better than others at stimulating certain immune cells, specifically CD8+ T cells. (2020-04-09)
Mindfulness program may benefit patients with irritable bowel syndrome
Adults with irritable bowel syndrome experienced fewer gastrointestinal symptoms after they participated in a mindfulness program meant to reduce stress. (2020-04-08)
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