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Current Gene transfer News and Events

Current Gene transfer News and Events, Gene transfer News Articles.
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Stronger tropical cyclones strengthen the Kuroshio Current, further heating high latitudes
As the intensity and frequency of the strongest cyclones east of Taiwan have increased, so has the strength of the Kuroshio current, a Pacific current responsible for redistributing heat throughout the western North Pacific Ocean. (2020-05-28)
Researchers track how bacteria purge toxic metals
Cornell researchers combined genetic engineering, single-molecule tracking and protein quantitation to get a closer look at this mechanism and understand how it functions. (2020-05-28)
Dementia gene raises risk of severe COVID-19
Having a faulty gene linked to dementia doubles the risk of developing severe COVID-19, according to a large-scale study. (2020-05-26)
Mount Sinai research helps explain why COVID-19 may be less common in children than adults
Lower levels of ACE2 nasal gene expression in children may explain why children have a lower risk of Covid-19 infection and mortality. (2020-05-21)
Weight loss surgery may alter gene expression in fat tissue
New findings published in the Journal of Internal Medicine reveal altered gene expression in fat tissue may help explain why individuals who have regained weight after weight loss surgery still experience benefits such as metabolic improvements and a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. (2020-05-21)
Discovery of a new biomarker for Alzheimer's sisease (AD)
KBRI research team led by Dr. Jae-Yeol Joo publishes new findings in IJMS. (2020-05-19)
A new epigenetic editing tool is developed to activate silenced genes
The research project is based on the CRISPR genetic editing technique and uses a plant protein to control gene expression in in-vitro cells. (2020-05-18)
Danish researchers find new breast cancer gene in young people
New research shows for the first time that RBBP8 gene variants may lead to the development of breast cancer in very young women. (2020-05-14)
Defective graphene has high electrocatalytic activity
Russian scientists have conducted a theoretical study of the effects of defects in graphene on electron transfer at the graphene-solution interface. (2020-05-11)
A new plant-based system for the mass production of allergens for immunotherapy
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba developed a novel system for the mass production of allergens. (2020-05-10)
Like a molecular knob: That is how a gene controls the electrical activity of the brain
Its name is Foxg1, it is a gene, and its unprecedented role is the protagonist of the discovery just published on the journal Cerebral Cortex. (2020-05-08)
Seahorse and pipefish study by CCNY opens window to marine genetic diversity May 08, 2020
The direction of ocean currents can determine the direction of gene flow in rafting species, but this depends on species traits that allow for rafting propensity. (2020-05-08)
Building blocks of the cell wall: pectin drives reproductive development in rice
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have revealed that pectin, a carbohydrate found in plant cell walls, plays a vital part in the development of female reproductive tissues of rice plants. (2020-05-07)
Virgin birth has scientists buzzing
In a study published today in Current Biology, researchers from University of Sydney have identified the single gene that determines how Cape honey bees reproduce without ever having sex. (2020-05-07)
Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Mass General advancing novel gene-based COVID-19 vaccine, AAVCOVID
A unique COVID-19 genetic vaccine program is underway with Mass. (2020-05-05)
Intensive farming increases risk of epidemics, warn scientists
Overuse of antibiotics, high animal numbers and low genetic diversity from intensive farming increase the risk of animal pathogens transferring to humans. (2020-05-04)
Twisting 2D materials uncovers their superpowers
Researchers can now grow twistronic material at sizes large enough to be useful. (2020-05-01)
ETRI develops world's top-class 400-Gbps optical engine
The Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) in South Korea has succeeded to develop a world's top-class 400-Gbps transmitting/receiving optical engine. (2020-04-29)
Algae in the oceans often steal genes from bacteria
Algae in the oceans often steal genes from bacteria to gain beneficial attributes, such as the ability to tolerate stressful environments or break down carbohydrates for food, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. (2020-04-29)
Understanding how fluids heat or cool surfaces
Textbook formulas for describing heat flow characteristics, crucial in many industries, are oversimplified, study shows. (2020-04-28)
SU2C-funded research to be presented during the AACR Virtual Meeting -- April 27-28, 2020
Stand Up To Cancer®-supported research will be presented will be presented during the American Association for Cancer Research Annual (AACR) Virtual Meeting 1. (2020-04-27)
Study shows glaucoma could be successfully treated with gene therapy
A new study led by the University of Bristol has shown a common eye condition, glaucoma, could be successfully treated with a single injection using gene therapy, which would improve treatment options, effectiveness and quality of life for many patients. (2020-04-21)
Human pregnancy is weird -- new research adds to the mystery
University at Buffalo and University of Chicago scientists set out to investigate the evolution of a gene that helps women stay pregnant: the progesterone receptor gene. (2020-04-21)
Novel class of specific RNAs may explain increased depression susceptibility in females
Researchers at Mount Sinai have found that a novel class of genes known as long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) expressed in the brain may play a pivotal role in regulating mood and driving sex-specific susceptibility versus resilience to depression. (2020-04-21)
Study identifies last-line antibiotic resistance in humans and pet dog
New research due to be presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) has identified the dangerous mcr-1 gene -which provides resistance to the last line antibiotic colistin -- - in two healthy humans and a pet dog. (2020-04-19)
Study suggests pets are not a major source of transmission of drug-resistant microbes to their owners
New research due to be presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) has identified genetically identical multidrug-resistant bacteria in humans and their pets, suggesting human-animal transfer is possible in this context. (2020-04-19)
Simulations show how to make gene therapy more effective
Diseases with a genetic cause could be treated by supplying a correct version of the faulty gene. (2020-04-17)
Novel technology aims to improve treatment of neurological diseases
Researchers at Princeton University are developing new ''gene promoters'' - which act like switches to turn genes on - for use with gene therapy, the delivery of new genes to replace ones that are faulty. (2020-04-17)
Genetic variation not an obstacle to gene drive strategy to control mosquitoes
New research from entomologists at UC Davis clears a potential obstacle to using CRISPR-Cas9 'gene drive' technology to control mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever and Zika. (2020-04-16)
Switching on a key cancer gene could provide first curative treatment for heart disease
Researchers trying to turn off a gene that allows cancers to spread have made a surprising U-turn. (2020-04-14)
Scientists provide new insight on how bacteria share drug resistance genes
Researchers have been able to identify and track the exchange of genes among bacteria that allow them to become resistant to drugs, according to a new study published today in eLife. (2020-04-14)
USDA-ARS scientists find new tool to combat major wheat disease
Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their colleagues have discovered a gene that can be used to develop varieties of wheat that will be more resistant to a disease that is a major threat both overseas and to the nation's $10 billion annual wheat crop. (2020-04-10)
Fungus-derived gene in wild wheatgrass relative confers fusarium resistance in wheat
In a wild relative of cultivated wheat, researchers have found a gene, likely delivered through horizontal gene transfer from a fungus, they show, that drives resistance to fusarium head blight (FHB) -- an intractable fungal disease devastating wheat crops worldwide. (2020-04-09)
New study shows how oxygen transfer is altered in diseased lung tissue
A multidisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has developed tiny sensors that measure oxygen transport in bovine lung tissue. (2020-04-09)
The human body as an electrical conductor, a new method of wireless power transfer
The project Electronic AXONs: wireless microstimulators based on electronic rectification of epidermically applied currents (eAXON, 2017-2022), funded by a European Research Council (ERC) Consolidator Grant awarded to Antoni Ivorra, head of the Biomedical Electronics Research Group (BERG) of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies (DTIC) at UPF principally aims to 'develop very thin, flexible, injectable microstimulators to restore movement in paralysis', says Ivorra, principal investigator of the project. (2020-04-06)
Tissue dynamics provide clues to human disease
Scientists in EMBL Barcelona's Ebisuya group, with collaborators from RIKEN, Kyoto University, and Meijo Hospital in Nagoya, Japan, have studied oscillating patterns of gene expression, coordinated across time and space within a tissue grown in vitro, to explore the molecular causes of a rare human hereditary disease known as spondylocostal dysostosis. (2020-04-03)
Physical force alone spurs gene expression, study reveals
Cells will ramp up gene expression in response to physical forces alone, a new study finds. (2020-04-01)
Scientists discover gene that increases risk of Alzheimer's disease
Researchers from the University of British Columbia (UBC) and the Central South University (CSU) in China have for the first time identified a gene that increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. (2020-03-31)
Benefiting from the national gene vector biorepository
Gene therapy investigators can greatly benefit from the resources and services provided by the National Gene Vector Biorepository (NGVB), housed at the Indiana University School of Medicine. (2020-03-27)
Insights into the diagnosis and treatment brain cancer in children
In a recent study published in Autophagy, researchers at Kanazawa University show how abnormalities in a gene called TPR can lead to pediatric brain cancer. (2020-03-26)
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