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Current Genes News and Events, Genes News Articles.
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Study sheds light on the darker parts of our genetic heritage
More than half of our genome consists of transposons, DNA sequences that are reminiscent of ancient, extinct viruses. Transposons are normally silenced by a process known as DNA methylation, but their activation can lead to serious diseases. (2019-07-19)
New insight into microRNA function can give gene therapy a boost
Scientists at the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Oxford have shown that small RNA molecules occurring naturally in cells, i.e. microRNAs, are also abundant in cell nuclei. (2019-07-17)
Red algae steal genes from bacteria to cope with environmental stresses
It's a case of grand larceny that could lead to new fuels and cleanup chemicals. (2019-07-17)
UMN researcher identifies differences in genes that impact response to cryptococcus infection
Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that infects people with weakened immune systems, particularly those with advanced HIV/AIDS. (2019-07-16)
Determining gene function will help understanding of processes of life
Scientists at the University of Kent have developed a new method of determining gene function in a breakthrough that could have major implications for our understanding of the processes of life. (2019-07-15)
Does rearranging chromosomes affect their function?
Molecular biologists long thought that domains in the genome's 3D organization control how genes are expressed. (2019-07-15)
Ancient epigenetic changes silence cancer-linked genes
A study in zebrafish indicates that some genes linked to cancers in humans have been strictly regulated throughout evolution. (2019-07-11)
A moderate dose of novel form of stress promotes longevity
A newly described form of stress called chromatin architectural defect, or chromatin stress, triggers in cells a response that leads to a longer life. (2019-07-10)
Body plan evolution not as simple as once believed
Hox gene do not work alone to determine the layout of vertebrae, limbs and other body parts. (2019-07-09)
Altered gene expression may trigger collapse of symbiotic relationship
Researchers in Japan have identified the potential genes responsible for coral bleaching caused by temperature elevation. (2019-07-04)
Discovery linking microbes to methane emissions could make agriculture more sustainable
Common dairy cows share the same core group of genetically inherited gut microbes, which influence factors such as how much methane the animals release during digestion and how efficiently they produce milk, according to a new study. (2019-07-03)
Can mathematics help us understand the complexity of our microbiome?
In humans, the gut microbiome is an ecosystem of hundreds to thousands of microbial species living within the gastrointestinal tract, influencing health and even longevity. (2019-07-02)
New method divides patients with ulcerative colitis in groups
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found a way of using gene expression conserved across species to divide patients with the inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis into two distinct groups. (2019-06-28)
How human genetic data is helping dogs fight cancer
Colorado study sequences 33 canine cancer cell lines to identify 'human' genetic changes could be driving these canine cancers, possibly helping veterinary oncologists use more human medicines to cure cancer in dogs. (2019-06-25)
Virus genes help determine if pea aphids get their wings
Researchers from the University of Rochester shed light on the important role that microbial genes, like those from viruses, can play in insect and animal evolution. (2019-06-14)
Discovery of new mutations may lead to better treatment
In the largest study to date on developmental delay, researchers analyzed genomic data from over 31,000 parent-child trios and found more than 45,000 de novo mutations, and 40 novel genes. (2019-06-14)
Scientists edge closer to root causes of multiple sclerosis
An international team of researchers led by the University of British Columbia has made a scientific advance they hope will lead to the development of preventative treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS). (2019-06-06)
First-ever spider glue genes sequenced, paving way to next biomaterials breakthrough
UMBC's Sarah Stellwagen and Rebecca Renberg at the Army Reserach Lab have determined the first-ever complete sequences of two spider glue genes. (2019-06-05)
Brussels scientists developed an AI method to improve rare disease diagnosis
A team of Belgian researchers, led by the ULB-VUB's 'Interuniversity Institute of Bioinformatics' (or IB²) in Brussels, has developed an AI method to identify potential genetic causes of rare diseases, based on computer analysis. (2019-06-05)
Surprising enzymes found in giant ocean viruses
A new study led by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and Swansea University Medical School furthers our knowledge of viruses -- in the sea and on land -- and their potential to cause life-threatening illnesses. (2019-06-05)
New genes out of nothing
One key question in evolutionary biology is how novel genes arise and develop. (2019-06-04)
Surprisingly, inbred isle royale wolves dwindle because of fewer harmful genes
The tiny, isolated gray wolf population on Isle Royale has withered to near-extinction, but not because each animal carries a large number of harmful genes, according to a new genetic analysis. (2019-05-29)
Iconic Australian working dog may not be part dingo after all
Researchers at the University of Sydney have found no genetic evidence that the iconic Australian kelpie shares canine ancestry with a dingo, despite Australian bush myth. (2019-05-27)
New leaf shapes for thale cress
Max Planck researchers equip the plant with pinnate leaves. (2019-05-23)
How bacteria acquire antibiotic resistance in the presence of antibiotics
A new study's disconcerting findings reveal how antibiotic resistance is able to spread between bacteria cells despite the presence of antibiotics that should prevent them from growing. (2019-05-23)
Neurobiology: Doubly secured
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have used CRISPR technology to probe the mechanisms that guide the developmental trajectories of stem cells in the brain. (2019-05-20)
Brain cell genomics reveals molecular pathology of autism
Molecular changes in specific types of neural cells and brain circuits correlate with the clinical severity of autism spectrum disorder, a new single-cell analysis of brain cells from autism patients finds. (2019-05-16)
Multiple sclerosis: Discovery of a mechanism responsible for chronic inflammation
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease. The defense system that usually protects patients from external aggression turns on its own cells and attacks them for reasons that are not yet known. (2019-05-10)
Seed abortion and the role of RNA Pol IV in seed development
In this newly released article in The Plant Cell, researchers find that in Arabidopsis plants, the abortion of seeds with extra genomes is caused by the enzyme RNA Pol IV and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway, a major gene-silencing pathway in plants. (2019-05-07)
New computational tool improves gene identification
Looking to improve the identification of genes associates with disease, a team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has developed a new bioinformatics tool that analyzes CRISPR pooled screen data and identifies candidates for potentially relevant genes with greater sensitivity and accuracy than other existing methods. (2019-05-06)
Mount Sinai researchers identify 20 novel gene associations with bipolar disorder
In the largest study of its kind, involving more than 50,000 subjects in 14 countries, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and more than 200 collaborating institutions have identified 20 new genetic associations with one of the most prevalent and elusive mental illnesses of our time -- bipolar disorder. (2019-05-01)
Scientists identify genes tied to increased risk of ovarian cancer
A team of researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer, Cedars-Sinai Cancer and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have newly identified 34 genes that are associated with an increased risk for developing the earliest stages of ovarian cancer. (2019-05-01)
Genes hold the key to birthweight
The largest genetic study of its kind has led to new insights into how the genes of mothers and babies influence birth weight. (2019-05-01)
Screening for genes to improve protein production in yeast
By silencing genes, researchers have managed to increase protein production in yeast significantly. (2019-04-26)
Large genome-wide association study is first to focus on both child and adult asthma
Asthma, a common respiratory disease that causes wheezing, coughing and shortness of breath, is the most prevalent chronic respiratory disease worldwide. (2019-04-26)
First major study of proteins in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia
The most common form of childhood cancer is acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). (2019-04-25)
How lifestyle affects our genes
In the past decade, knowledge of how lifestyle affects our genes, a research field called epigenetics, has grown exponentially. (2019-04-23)
Researchers find high-risk genes for schizophrenia
Using a unique computational 'framework' they developed, a team of scientist cyber-sleuths in the Vanderbilt University Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics and the Vanderbilt Genetics Institute (VGI) has identified 104 high-risk genes for schizophrenia. (2019-04-22)
What makes a jellyfish?
Genomic study reveals how jellyfish develop into floating beauties, rather than staying stationary like corals or sea anemones. (2019-04-15)
Biologists uncover new rules for cellular decision-making in genetics
A team of biologists has uncovered new rules that cells use in making decisions about which genes they activate and under what conditions, findings that add to our understanding of how gene variants affect human traits. (2019-04-11)
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