Current Genes News and Events

Current Genes News and Events, Genes News Articles.
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Giant aquatic bacterium is a master of adaptation
The largest freshwater bacterium, Achromatium oxaliferum, is highly flexible in its requirements, as researchers led by the IGB have now discovered: It lives in places that differ extremely in environmental conditions such as hot springs and ice water. The adaptation is probably achieved by a process which is unique to these bacteria: only relevant genes are enriched in the genomes and transcribed, while others are archived in cell compartments. (2020-11-19)

Importance of mitochondrial-related genes in dilated cardiomyopathy
Importance of Mitochondrial-Related Genes in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Based on Bioinformatics Analysis. In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0588, Yukuan Chen, Xiaohui Wu, Danchun Hu and Wei Wang, from the Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, China and Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, China consider the importance of mitochondrial-related genes in dilated cardiomyopathy. (2020-11-19)

New prediction algorithm identifies previously undetected cancer driver genes
A new study, led by researchers from the University of California, Irvine, has deepened the understanding of epigenetic mechanisms in tumorigenesis and revealed a previously undetected repertoire of cancer driver genes. The study was published this week in Science Advances. (2020-11-12)

UConn researcher identifies genetic elements involved in heart development
Justin Cotney, assistant professor of genetics and genome sciences in the UConn School of Medicine, has identified a suite of genes and regulatory elements critical to normal heart development. (2020-11-03)

New assay screens human brain organoids, doubles known candidate genes for microcephaly
A new tissue screening assay for human cerebral organoids identified 25 additional candidate genes for microcephaly, nearly doubling the number of currently known genes linked to the rare neurological condition. (2020-10-29)

UMass Amherst research compares sensitivity of all genes to chemical exposure
A University of Massachusetts Amherst environmental health scientist has used an unprecedented objective approach to identify which molecular mechanisms in mammals are the most sensitive to chemical exposures. (2020-10-29)

Genetic analysis system yields new insights into bacterial pneumonia
A team of infectious disease researchers has developed a new method to identify virulence genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia. Using this technique in a mouse model of pneumonia, they were able to gain new insights into the progression of the disease and its interaction with the flu virus. (2020-10-28)

Cauliflower coral genome sequenced
A newly sequenced coral genome offers tools to understand environmental adaptation. (2020-10-27)

Breast cancer risk and disease-causing mutations in women over age 65
In a new study presented at the ASHG 2020 Virtual Meeting, researchers investigated the prevalence of disease-causing variants in established breast cancer predisposition genes in women over age 65. (2020-10-26)

New COVID-19 related genes -- helpful and harmful -- found in massive screen
Researchers at Yale University and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard screened hundreds of millions of cells exposed to the COVID-19 and MERS viruses and identified dozens of genes that both enable the viruses to replicate in cells and also those that seem to slam the door on the virus. The pro-viral and anti-viral role of these genes will help guide scientists in development of new therapies to combat COVID-19, the researchers say. (2020-10-26)

World first study shows that some microorganisms can bend the rules of evolution
The dominant thinking in evolution focuses on inheritance between parent and offspring - or 'vertical gene transfer (VGT)'. But now scientists are paying more attention to 'horizontal gene transfer (HGT)': the transmission of DNA other than from parent to offspring, as this transfer can tell us about the evolution of a number of other organisms such as bacteria. It can also help us to better understand antibiotic resistance. (2020-10-13)

The CNIO reprograms CRISPR system in mice to eliminate tumor cells without affecting healthy cells
CNIO researchers destroyed Ewing's sarcoma and chronic myeloid leukaemia tumor cells by using CRISPR to cut out the fusion genes that cause them. For the first time, fusion genes have been selectively and efficiently removed using CRISPR. These genes are attracting a great deal of interest from the research community because they are unique to the tumor cell and are therefore excellent targets for the development of future drugs that only attack the tumor and are harmless for healthy cells. (2020-10-08)

Evolution: Shifts in mating preference
In their efforts to identify the genetic basis for differences in mate choice that keep two co-existing species of butterfly separate, evolutionary biologists at Ludwig-Maximlians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have identified five candidate genes that are associated with divergence in visual mating preferences. (2020-10-06)

Neuroscientists discover a molecular mechanism that allows memories to form
Encoding memories in engram cells is controlled by large-scale remodeling of the proteins and DNA that make up cells' chromatin, according to an MIT study. This chromatin remodeling, which allows specific genes involved in storing memories to become more active, takes place in multiple stages spread out over several days. (2020-10-05)

Researchers zero in on genetic connection to postpartum hemorrhage
Researchers have identified genetic mutations that appear to protect women from severe bleeding after childbirth, a leading cause of maternal death. A preliminary study of the findings is being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-03)

A RUDN University biologist described how a harmless bacterium turns into a phytopathogen
A researcher from RUDN University suggested that Xanthomonas bacteria that are harmful to plants might have developed from a nonpathogenic related species by receiving virulence genes from other species of bacteria. (2020-10-03)

Genetic differences in body fat shape men and women's health risks
New findings about body fat help explain the differing health risks men and women face - and set the stage for better, more targeted treatments. (2020-09-28)

The male Y chromosome does more than we thought
While the Y chromosome's role was believed to be limited to the functions of the sexual organs, an University of Montreal's scientist has shown that it impacts the functions of other organs as well. (2020-09-25)

Bird genes are multitaskers, say scientists
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have found that although male and female birds have an almost identical set of genes, they function differently in each sex through a mechanism called alternative splicing. (2020-09-25)

Genome of Alexander Fleming's original penicillin-producing mould sequenced
Researchers have sequenced the genome of Alexander Fleming's penicillin mould for the first time and compared it to later versions. (2020-09-24)

New genes for human deafness found in Israeli families
Until now, only seven genes were known to be involved in hearing loss in Israel's Jewish population. A new study from the Sackler Faculty of Medicine at Tel Aviv University has found that 32 genes are responsible for inherited hearing loss in Israeli Jewish families. The researchers also identified a mutation in a gene not previously recognized to cause hearing loss in humans. The research has immediate implications for genetic counseling for families with hearing loss and for care of children with hearing loss. (2020-09-23)

Scientists identify dozens of genes allowing cancer cells to evade the immune system
Cancer immunotherapy can be extremely successful but so far has only worked in a fraction of patients and tumour types. To make it more widely available, more knowledge is needed about the genes involved in the interaction between cancer and immune cells. In the most comprehensive study to date, Toronto scientists have mapped 182 genes that make cancer cells more susceptible or resistant to T cell killing that could be harnessed to boost immunotherapy success. (2020-09-23)

The co-occurrence of cancer driver genes, key to precision medicine
Researchers from the Structural Bioinformatics and Network Biology Laboratory at IRB Barcelona develop a system to predict tumour response to different treatments. Called Targeted Cancer Therapy for You (TCT4U), this system has allowed them to identify a set of complex biomarkers that are available to the medical-scientific community. The work has been published in the journal Genome Medicine. (2020-09-22)

New study identifies wheat varieties that resist the destructive stripe rust disease
Stripe rust is one of the most destructive wheat diseases in the world, especially in the United States. While the disease can be controlled by chemicals, those may be harmful to humans, animals, and the environment and the application can cost millions of dollars. Rather than use chemicals, many farmers would prefer to grow wheat varieties that resist stripe rust and the development of such varieties is a top priority for wheat breeding programs. (2020-09-17)

Veterinary college team IDs gene that drives ovarian cancer
scientists at the College of Veterinary Medicine have collaborated on a study that pinpoints which specific genes drive - or delay - high-grade serious ovarian carcinoma. (2020-09-11)

Are male genes from Mars, female genes from Venus?
In a new paper in the PERSPECTIVES section of the journal Science, Melissa Wilson reviews current research into patterns of sex differences in gene expression across the genome, and highlights sampling biases in the human populations included in such studies. (2020-09-11)

Addicted to the sun? Research shows it's in your genes
Sun-seeking behaviour is linked to genes involved in addiction, behavioural and personality traits and brain function, according to a study of more than 260,000 people led by King's College London researchers. (2020-09-10)

The birth of a male sex chromosome in Atlantic herring
The evolution of sex chromosomes is of crucial importance in biology as it stabilises the mechanism underlying sex determination and usually results in an equal sex ratio. An international team of scientists, led by researchers from Uppsala University, now reports that they have been able to reconstruct the birth of a male sex chromosome in the Atlantic herring. The male-specific region is tiny and contains only three genes: a sex-determining factor and two genes for sperm proteins. (2020-09-09)

An evolutionary roll of the dice explains why we're not perfect
Scientists have found that chance events can be more important than natural selection in defining the genome of species like humans and other mammals. (2020-09-09)

Gene therapy: Novel targets come into view
Retinitis pigmentosa is the most prevalent form of congenital blindness. Using a retinitis pigmentosa mouse model, researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now shown that targeted activation of genes of similar function can compensate for the primary defect. (2020-09-02)

A surprising protein player in diabetes
Conducted by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University and Riken Center of Integrative Medical Sciences, a study looking at pancreatic beta cells has found a link between a commonly found protein, a subset of switched-off genes and the development of diabetes. (2020-08-28)

Genetic link between cattle temperament and autism
Researchers have discovered that cattle share an overlap of genes with humans that are critical in brain function and response to fear stimuli. The results open the way for research conducted on behavioural traits in humans to shed further light on temperament in cattle. The study confirms that temperament has a significant genetic basis in cattle - around 35 per cent - and it is the first time a whole genome sequence has been used to analyse temperament in cattle. (2020-08-27)

Mount Sinai researchers identify master regulator genes of asthma
The identified master regulators causally regulate the expression of downstream genes that modulate ciliary function and inflammatory response to influence asthma. (2020-08-20)

Potential link for Alzheimer's disease and common brain disease that mimics its symptoms
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital uncovered a group of closely related genes that may capture molecular links between Alzheimer's disease and Limbic-predominant Age-related TDP-43 Encephalopathy, or LATE, a recently recognized common brain disorder that can mimic Alzheimer's symptoms. (2020-08-19)

Discovery promising for millions at risk from antibiotic resistance
There is new hope for approximately 700,000 people who die each year from antibiotic resistant infections, with University of Queensland researchers discovering how bacteria share antibiotic-resistance genes. UQ's Professor Mark Schembri said antibiotic resistant bacteria, in particular emerging 'superbugs', could lead to around 10 million deaths globally by 2050. (2020-08-17)

Pollution linked to antibiotic resistance
Antibiotic resistance is an increasing health problem, but new research suggests it is not only caused by the overuse of antibiotics. It's also caused by pollution. (2020-08-13)

Why the 'wimpy' Y chromosome hasn't evolved out of existence
The Y chromosome has shrunken drastically over 200 million years of evolution. Even those who study it have used the word ''wimpy'' to describe it, and yet it continues to stick around. An Opinion paper publishing on August 6, 2020 in the journal Trends in Genetics outlines a new theory--called the 'persistent Y hypothesis'--to explain why the Y chromosome may be more resilient than it first appears. (2020-08-06)

Blood test could diagnose baby brain damage just hours after birth
An early blood test could detect which babies deprived of oxygen at birth are at risk of serious neurodisabilities like cerebral palsy and epilepsy. (2020-08-04)

Loss of adaptive immunity helps deep sea anglerfish fuse with their mates
The discovery of altered adaptive immunity in anglerfish helps explain how the creatures are able to temporarily or permanently fuse with their mates without experiencing immune rejection. (2020-07-30)

FSU biologist uses genome database to investigate cancer cells
Florida State University Professor of Biological Science David Gilbert is using the latest information about the human genome as a guide to better understand cancer. (2020-07-29)

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