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Current Genetic code News and Events

Current Genetic code News and Events, Genetic code News Articles.
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What makes a jellyfish?
Genomic study reveals how jellyfish develop into floating beauties, rather than staying stationary like corals or sea anemones. (2019-04-15)
Genetic variant linked to cucumber fruit length
Fruit size is a major determinant of yield and market value. (2019-04-12)
Rare gut condition a model for study of genetic diseases
A study published online in the April 11, 2019 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine found that Hirschsprung disease is more predictable from an individual's genetic makeup than previously thought. (2019-04-11)
Genome analysis shows the combined effect of many genes on cognitive traits
Individual differences in cognitive abilities in children and adolescents are partly reflected in variations in their DNA sequence, according to a study published in Molecular Psychiatry. (2019-04-10)
Is it genetic code or postal code that influence a child's life chances?
Most children inherit both their postal code and their genetic code from their parents. (2019-04-08)
New DNA 'shredder' technique goes beyond CRISPR's scissors
An international team has unveiled a new CRISPR-based tool that acts more like a shredder than the usual scissor-like action of CRISPR-Cas9. (2019-04-08)
Research identifies genetic causes of poor sleep
The largest genetic study of its kind ever to use accelerometer data to examine how we slumber has uncovered a number of parts of our genetic code that could be responsible for causing poor sleep quality and duration. (2019-04-05)
Building blocks of DNA and RNA could have appeared together before life began on Earth
Scientists for the first time have found strong evidence that RNA and DNA could have arisen from the same set of precursor molecules even before life evolved on Earth about four billion years ago. (2019-04-01)
A more accurate method to diagnose cancer subtypes
Garvan researchers have developed a method for detecting the products of 'fusion' genes in cancer cells more accurately than current clinical methods. (2019-03-27)
Smartphone test spots poisoned water risk to millions of lives
A smartphone device developed at the University of Edinburgh could help millions of people avoid drinking water contaminated by arsenic. (2019-03-26)
Genetic tagging may help conserve the world's wildlife
Tracking animals using DNA signatures are ideally suited to answer the pressing questions required to conserve the world's wildlife, providing benefits over invasive methods such as ear tags and collars, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-03-26)
Optical toric code platform sets new record
A research group led by professor PAN Jianwei and LU Chaoyang of University of Science and Technology of China successfully designed the largest planar code platform at present using photons, and demonstrated path-independent property in optical system for the first time. (2019-03-25)
Mount Sinai researchers identify over 400 genes associated with schizophrenia development
In the largest study of its kind, involving more than 100,000 people, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have applied a novel machine learning method to identify 413 genetic associations with schizophrenia across 13 brain regions. (2019-03-25)
Open-source solution: Researchers 3D-print system for optical cardiography
Researchers from the George Washington University and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed a solution for multiparametric optical mapping of the heart's electrical activity. (2019-03-21)
UIC researchers find hidden proteins in bacteria
Scientists at the University of Illinois at Chicago have developed a way to identify the beginning of every gene -- known as a translation start site or a start codon -- in bacterial cell DNA with a single experiment and, through this method, they have shown that an individual gene is capable of coding for more than one protein. (2019-03-20)
Expansion of transposable elements offers clue to genetic paradox
A research group led by Professor GUO Yalong from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with SONG Ge, and Sureshkumar Balasubramanian from the School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Australia, has revealed that transposable element insertions could potentially help species with limited genetic variation adapt to novel environments. (2019-03-17)
Scientists crack genome of superfood seaweed, ito-mozuku
For the first time, researchers unveil the genome of ito-mozuku (Nemacystus decipiens), the popular Japanese brown seaweed, providing data that could help farmers better grow the health food. (2019-03-14)
Breath of fresh air in vasculitis research
A University of Tsukuba-led research team revealed that a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter of the MUC5B gene encoding a mucin 5B confers susceptibility to interstitial lung disease (ILD) in Japanese patients suffering from antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV). (2019-03-12)
Could genetic breakthrough finally help take the sting out of mouth ulcers?
A large breakthrough has been made in the genetic understanding of mouth ulcers which could provide potential for a new drug to prevent or heal the painful lesions. (2019-03-05)
In search of new 'sugar cleavers'
Complex sugars play multiple and essential roles in the living world. (2019-03-04)
Biologists find the long and short of it when it comes to chromosomes
A team of biologists has uncovered a mechanism that determines faithful inheritance of short chromosomes during the reproductive process. (2019-02-27)
Researchers discover cell mechanism that delays and repairs DNA damage that can lead to cancer
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have identified a specific mechanism that protects our cells from natural DNA errors -- an 'enemy within' -- which could permanently damage our genetic code and lead to diseases such as cancer. (2019-02-27)
Aiming for gold: improving reproducibility in hydrology studies
Low levels of reproducibility are not uncommon in hydrology studies. (2019-02-27)
Study sheds more light on genes' 'on/off' switches
Regulation of genes by noncoding DNA might help explain the complex interplay between our environment and genetic expression. (2019-02-26)
International team of scientists detect cause of rare pediatric brain disorder
An international effort led by physician-scientists at Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine (RCIGM), in collaboration with a team at the Montreal Children's Hospital of the McGill University Health Centre (MCH-MUHC), has identified the cause of a devastating pediatric brain disorder paving the way for the first step in developing potential therapies for this rare neurodegenerative condition. (2019-02-25)
Simplified method makes cell-free protein synthesis more flexible and accessible
Researchers have radically simplified the method for cell-free protein synthesis, a technique that could become fundamental to medical research. (2019-02-25)
How genetic background shapes individual differences within a species
Study reveals how genetic background influences trait inheritance laying the grounds for predicting personal risk of disease. (2019-02-25)
Preventing the production of toxic mitochondrial proteins -- a promising treatment target
Researchers at the University of Helsinki uncovered the mechanisms for a novel cellular stress response arising from the toxicity of newly synthesized proteins. (2019-02-21)
Hachimoji -- Expanding the genetic alphabet from four to eight
A new form of synthetic DNA expands the information density of the genetic code, that likely preserves its capability for supporting life, according to a new study. (2019-02-21)
Putting data privacy in the hands of users
MIT and Harvard University researchers have developed Riverbed, a platform that ensures web and mobile apps using distributed computing in data centers adhere to users' preferences on how their data are shared and stored in the cloud. (2019-02-20)
Novel gene therapy approach creates new route to tackle rare, inherited diseases
A new study reveals a novel approach and robust technology platform for suppressing nonsense mutations using engineered transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules. (2019-02-19)
Grasses can acquire genes from neighboring plants
Published in the Feb. 18, 2019, edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a study led by an international team including Guillaume Besnard, CNRS researcher at the 'Evolution et diversité biologique' laboratory (CNRS/IRD/Université Toulouse III -- Paul Sabatier), reveals that the genome of Alloteropsis semialata, a grass found in Australia, contains nearly 60 genes acquired from at least nine donor grasses species. (2019-02-18)
Genetic tricks of rabbits resistant to fatal viral disease
Underlying genetic variation in the immune systems of rabbits allowed them to rapidly evolve genetic resistance to the myxoma virus, a deadly rabbit pathogen introduced into Europe and Australia during the 1950s, according to a new study. (2019-02-14)
Movement impairments in autism could be reversible
Researchers from Cardiff University have established a link between a genetic mutation and developmental movement impairments in autism. (2019-02-13)
Study of Arctic fishes reveals the birth of a gene -- from 'junk'
Though separated by a world of ocean, and unrelated to each other, two fish groups - one in the Arctic, the other in the Antarctic - share a surprising survival strategy: They both have evolved the ability to produce the same special brand of antifreeze protein in their tissues. (2019-02-11)
'Improbable things happen'
For some of us, they carry the bright blue of our grandfather's eyes. (2019-02-11)
Does the presence of colleges and hospitals increase home prices?
Whether the presence of a college or hospital increases a home's value has to do with the institution's size and the ZIP code's population, says a new study by computer scientists at the University of California, Riverside. (2019-02-08)
RNAs play key role in protein aggregation and in neurodegenerative disease
New research reveals RNAs, which are crucial for cells to produce proteins, are also involved in protein aggregation, where proteins do not fold properly and 'clump' together into aggregates. (2019-02-07)
Bee dispersal ability may influence conservation measures
The abilities of various bee species to disperse influences the pattern of their population's genetic structure, which, in turn, can constrain how they respond to environmental change, as reported by an international team of researchers. (2019-02-07)
New method for high-speed synthesis of natural voices
The research team in National Institute of Informatics (NII/Tokyo, Japan) - Xin Wang, Shinji Takaki, and Junichi Yamagishi -- has developed the method of neural source-filter (NSF) models for high-speed, high-quality voice synthesis. (2019-02-05)
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