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Current Genetic code News and Events

Current Genetic code News and Events, Genetic code News Articles.
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Mount Sinai researchers discover treatment option for rare genetic disorder
Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine used a novel genetic sequencing technology to identify the genetic cause of--and a treatment for--a previously unknown severe auto inflam-matory syndrome affecting an 18-year-old girl since infancy. (2020-08-04)
Four-stranded DNA structures found to play role in breast cancer
Four stranded DNA structures - known as G-quadruplexes - have been shown to play a role in certain types of breast cancer for the first time, providing a potential new target for personalised medicine, say scientists at the University of Cambridge. (2020-08-03)
Stay or leave? A tale of two virus strategies revealed by math
By modeling experimentally measured characteristics of cells infected with hepatitis C in the lab, researchers in Japan found that one virus strain was roughly three times more likely to use copied genetic code to create new viruses compared to another, which instead tended to keep more copies inside an infected cell to accelerate replication. (2020-07-30)
High time to open up ecological research
Share code and data behind the research please. It's easy, but it will have a major positive impact on progress and trust in science. (2020-07-29)
UMMS scientists lead effort to annotate human genome
UMass Medical School scientists Jill Moore, PhD, Zhiping Weng, PhD, and MD/PhD students Michael Purcaro and Henry Pratt are lead authors on the latest publication of data from the ambitious ENCODE project to annotate the human genome. (2020-07-29)
Randomness theory could hold key to internet security
In a new paper, Cornell Tech researchers identified a problem that holds the key to whether all encryption can be broken -- as well as a surprising connection to a mathematical concept that aims to define and measure randomness. (2020-07-27)
Coronavirus makes changes that cause cells not to recognize it
The novel coronavirus changes the appearance of its messenger RNA cap to trick the host cell into not recognizing it is foreign, according to a study reported by researchers from UT Health San Antonio. (2020-07-24)
Genetic mutations predispose individuals to severe COVID-19
When two pairs of previously healthy young brothers from two families required mechanical ventilation at the intensive care unit in rapid succession, doctors and researchers at Radboud University Medical Center were inclined to consider that genetic factors had a key role in compromising their immune system. (2020-07-24)
Junk DNA might be really, really useful for biocomputing
When you don't understand how things work, it's not unusual to think of them as just plain old junk. (2020-07-22)
Siblings can also differ from one another in bacteria
A research team from the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) is investigating how pathogens influence the immune response of their host with genetic variation. (2020-07-22)
We are mutating SARS-CoV-2, but it is evolving back
Scientists at the Milner Centre for Evolution looked at the evolution of the virus that causes Covid19; their findings could help the design of a new vaccine. (2020-07-22)
Genetic variant may explain why some women don't need pain relief during childbirth
Women who do not need pain relief during childbirth may be carriers of a key genetic variant that acts a natural epidural, say scientists at the University of Cambridge. (2020-07-21)
Genes and cardiovascular health both affect dementia risk: BU study
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and School of Medicine (BUSM) study finds that genes and cardiovascular health can both raise or lower risk of dementia. (2020-07-21)
Magnetic field of a spiral galaxy
A new image from the VLA dramatically reveals the extended magnetic field of a spiral galaxy seen edge-on from Earth. (2020-07-21)
Finding hints at novel target for Ewing sarcoma therapy
A genetic code-reading machine that is overactive in the pediatric cancer Ewing sarcoma causes cell structures called nucleoli to break up, researchers found. (2020-07-16)
University of Toronto scientists uncover key process in the manufacture of ribosomes and proteins
Researchers at the University of Toronto have shown that an enzyme called RNA polymerase (Pol) II drives generation of the building blocks of ribosomes, the molecular machines that manufacture all proteins in cells based on the genetic code. (2020-07-15)
"Knock codes" for smartphone security are easily predicted, researchers say
Smartphone owners who unlock their devices with knock codes aren't as safe as they think, according to new research. (2020-07-14)
Rapid genome sequencing and screening help hospital manage COVID-19 outbreaks
Cambridge researchers have shown how rapid genome sequencing of virus samples and enhanced testing of hospital staff can help to identify clusters of healthcare-associated COVID-19 infections. (2020-07-14)
Molecular "tails" are secret ingredient for gene activation
Researchers in the lab of Caltech's Paul Sternberg discover how diverse forms of life are able to use the same cellular machinery for DNA transcription. (2020-07-14)
Surprisingly many peculiar long introns found in brain genes
In a recent study of genes involved in brain functioning, their previously unknown features have been uncovered by bioinformaticians from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and the Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology, RAS. (2020-07-09)
Born to be a cannibal: Genes for feeding behavior in mandarin fish identified
Some mandarin fish species (Sinipercidae) are pure fish-eaters, which feed exclusively on living juvenile fish - also of their own species. (2020-07-09)
Links between parents' and children's asthma and allergies
New research published in Clinical & Experimental Allergy found that, compared with a father's traits related to allergies and asthma, a mother's traits create a higher risk that a child will develop these same traits in early childhood. (2020-07-08)
Common inherited genetic variant identified as frequent cause of deafness in adults
A common inherited genetic variant is a frequent cause of deafness in adults, meaning that many thousands of people are potentially at risk, reveals research published online in the Journal of Medical Genetics. (2020-07-06)
New sequencing technology will help scientists decipher disease mechanisms
New technologies capable of sequencing single molecules in fine detail will help scientists better understand the mechanisms of rare nucleotides thought to play an important role in the progression of some diseases. (2020-07-02)
Next-generation sequencing to provide precision medicine for rare metabolic disorders
Advances in next-generation-sequencing technology that allow researchers to look at billions of pieces of genetic information are changing the way a disease is diagnosed. (2020-06-30)
NUS researchers uncover a novel protein which drives cancer progression
Researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore have discovered a protein that drives the progression of esophageal cancer and liver cancer and it could be a promising target for cancer drug development. (2020-06-29)
Scientists devise new 'bar code' method to identify critical cell types in the brain
A discovery by researchers at Brown's Center for Translational Neuroscience could pave the way for future studies aimed at developing solutions to ALS and other vexing neuromuscular diseases. (2020-06-25)
A vital game of hide-and-seek elucidated by novel single-molecule microscopy
Life depends on an intricate game of hide-and-seek taking place inside the cell. (2020-06-24)
World's first genetic and environmental risks identified for common form of childhood epilepsy
A new study of childhood epilepsy has identified the world's first environmental risk factor for the disease - maternal smoking in pregnancy, and discovered a new genetic association with the condition, pointing to potential new treatments for the disease. (2020-06-24)
Artificial intelligence classifies colorectal cancer using IR imaging
Infrared microscopy can automatically detect the type of intestinal tumour within only 30 minutes. (2020-06-24)
Scientists develop new tool to design better fusion devices
One way that scientists seek to bring to Earth the fusion process that powers the stars is trapping plasma within a twisting magnetic coil device shaped like a breakfast cruller. (2020-06-24)
Super-resolution microscopy reveals a twist inside of cells
EPFL biophysicists have developed a high-throughput super-resolution microscope to probe nanoscale structures and dynamics of mammalian cells, showing in unprecedented detail the twists and turns of an organelle important for cell division. (2020-06-22)
Earth's species have more in common than previously believed
In the largest mapping of proteins ever to be conducted across different species, an international team of researchers have analysed and compared the proteins of 100 animal, plant and bacterial species. (2020-06-17)
Immune properties in ancient DNA found in isolated villages might benefit humanity today
Could remnants of DNA from a now extinct human subspecies known as the Denisovans help boost the immune functions of modern humans? (2020-06-15)
Steering new mobility in the right direction
The latest report from the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC), by Marc Schlossberg and Heather Brinton of the University of Oregon, is a guide for city staff and leadership on adopting local policy and code to respond to the emergence of emerging transportation technologies and encourage their responsible use. (2020-06-12)
The best parents: Genetically as divergent as possible with similar preferences
The more diverse in genetics, than better. But only in cases of similar preferences. (2020-06-12)
Population ecology: Origins of genetic variability in seals
A new study led by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers shows that fluctuations in population sizes in the past have had a significant effect on contemporary seal populations, and estimates the risk of genetic impoverishment in the species investigated. (2020-06-10)
Strahl lab decodes another piece of the histone code puzzle
Published in the journal Cell Reports, this research reinforces the notion that the multiple chemical modifications placed on histones by a single enzyme ensures multiple and distinct functions -- an idea that was postulated by Strahl and his former mentor, David Allis, Ph.D., and was called the Histone Code hypothesis. (2020-06-09)
Scientists propose new naming system for uncultivated bacteria and archa
The long-standing rules for assigning scientific names to bacteria and archaea are overdue for an update, according to a new consensus statement backed by 119 microbiologists from around the globe. (2020-06-08)
A promise to restore hearing
For the first time, researchers have used base editing to restore partial hearing to mice with a recessive mutation in the gene TMC1 that causes complete deafness, the first successful example of genome editing to fix a recessive disease-causing mutation. (2020-06-03)
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