Current Genetic material News and Events

Current Genetic material News and Events, Genetic material News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
High genomic variability predicts success in desert tortoise refugees; could inform conservation
Tortoise refugees with the highest genetic variation are far more likely to survive conservation translocation than tortoises whose genetic diversity is lower, according to a new study. (2020-11-26)

Researchers have discovered new links between miscarriage and maternal genes
Researchers at the Estonian Genome Center at the University of Tartu described hitherto undiscovered associations between miscarriage and maternal genes, reveals a recent article published in the Nature Communication. (2020-11-25)

Grabbing viruses out of thin air
Materials that convert mechanical into electrical or magnetic energy could open the door to a future of wearable and structure-integrated virus sensors. (2020-11-25)

Space worms experiment reveals gravity affects genes
Living at low gravity affects cells at the genetic level, according to a study of worms in space. (2020-11-25)

Why experiences are better gifts for older children
What should we get for our kids this holiday? As children get older, giving them something they can experience (live through) instead of material things makes them happier, according to new research led by Lan Nguyen Chaplin, associate professor of marketing at the University of Illinois Chicago. (2020-11-24)

Carbon nanocomposites are now one step closer to practical industrial
Multifunctional materials were designed to allow self-diagnostic monitoring through an inexpensive technique. These materials were created by adding the carbon nanoparticles to polymer matrices. Essentially, the use of such materials has the potential to replace sensors in weight critical systems such as aircraft structures, with the material itself being able to provide measurements. (2020-11-23)

Making sense of a universe of corn genetics
A new study details the latest efforts to predict traits in corn based on genomics and data analytics. The data management technique could help to ''turbo charge'' the seemingly endless amount of genetic stocks contained in the world's seed banks, leading to faster and more efficient development of new crop varieties. (2020-11-23)

New findings speed progress towards affordable gene therapy
In a promising advance for affordable, personalised medicine, researchers have used metal-organic frameworks to successfully deliver the genetic snipping tool CRISPR/Cas9 into human cancer cells. (2020-11-20)

New process narrows the gap between natural and synthetic materials
Skin and cartilage are both strong and flexible - properties that are hard to replicate in artificial materials. But a new fabrication process, developed by scientists at EPFL, brings lifelike synthetic polymers a step closer. (2020-11-19)

Mystery solved: a 'New Kind of Electrons'
Why do certain materials emit electrons with a very specific energy? This has been a mystery for decades - scientists at TU Wien have found an answer. (2020-11-19)

Building a better electronic touch
Two new studies introduce materials that improve the capabilities of electronic 'touch,' boosting the multimodality of artificial skin so that it more resembles the capabilities of human skin. (2020-11-19)

Scientists develop a magnetic switch with lower energy consumption
Joint research conducted by the UAB has shown the ability to switch magnetizacion « on » and « off » using voltage in a new class of easy-to-fabricate materials containing nitrogen. These results, published in Nature Communications, may be used to reduce energy consumption in electronic technologies. (2020-11-18)

Researchers simulate privacy leaks in functional genomics studies
In a study publishing November 12 in the journal Cell, a team of investigators demonstrates that it's possible to de-identify raw functional genomics data to ensure patient privacy. They also demonstrate how these raw data could be linked back to specific individuals through their gene variants by something as simple as an abandoned coffee cup if these sanitation measures are not put in place. (2020-11-12)

Yale team finds way to protect genetic privacy in research
In a new report, a team of Yale scientists has developed a way to protect people's private genetic information while preserving the benefits of a free exchange of functional genomics data between researchers. (2020-11-12)

Predicting the risk of severe side effects of cancer treatment
The risk of serious adverse effects on the blood status and bone marrow of patients during chemotherapy can be predicted by a model developed at Linköping University, Sweden. This research may make it possible to use genetic analysis to identify patients with a high probability of side effects. The study has been published in npj Systems Biology and Applications. (2020-11-12)

Uracil switch in SARS-CoV-2 genome alters innate immune responses
Our bodies could be inducing mutations in the COVID-19 virus that activate immune cells to increase the production of pro-inflammatory molecules. (2020-11-11)

Connecting two classes of unconventional superconductors
The understanding of unconventional superconductivity is one of the most challenging and fascinating tasks of solid-state physics. Different classes of unconventional superconductors share that superconductivity emerges near a magnetic phase despite the underlying physics is different. (2020-11-11)

Turning heat into power with efficient organic thermoelectric material
Thermoelectric materials can turn a temperature difference into electricity. Organic thermoelectric materials could be used to power wearable electronics or sensors; however, the power output is still very low. An international team led by Jan Anton Koster, Professor of Semiconductor Physics at the University of Groningen, has now produced an n-type organic semiconductor with superior properties that brings these applications a big step closer. Their results were published in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-11-11)

Climate-adapted plant breeding
Securing plant production is a global task. Using a combination of new molecular and statistical methods, a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) was able to show that material from gene banks can be used to improve traits in the maize plant. Old varieties can thus help to breed new varieties adapted to current and future climates. (2020-11-11)

Swedish, Finnish and Russian wolves closely related
The Scandinavian wolf originally came from Finland and Russia, and unlike many other European wolf populations its genetic constitution is virtually free from dog admixture. In addition, individuals have migrated into and out of Scandinavia. These findings have emerged from new research at Uppsala University in which genetic material from more than 200 wolves was analysed. The study is published in the journal Evolutionary Applications. (2020-11-10)

Coating plastics by porous nanofilm
A research team has developed a new method for creating metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films that can be applied to sensors and electric devices. (2020-11-09)

Researchers discover bacterial DNA's recipe for success
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a way of modeling how potentially beneficial packages of DNA called plasmids circulate and accumulate through a complex environment that includes many bacterial species. The researchers hope that their new model will lay the groundwork for others to better model and predict how important traits such as antibiotic resistance in pathogens or metabolic abilities in bacteria bred to clean environmental pollution will spread and grow in a given environment. (2020-11-09)

Germanium telluride's hidden properties at the nanoscale revealed
Germanium Telluride is an interesting candidate material for spintronic devices. In a comprehensive study at BESSY II, a Helmholtz-RSF Joint Research Group has now revealed how the spin texture switches by ferroelectric polarization within individual nanodomains. (2020-11-06)

On the hunt for wild bananas in Papua New Guinea
Scientists are racing to collect and conserve wild banana species. A recent expedition to the epicenter of banana diversity shows that wild species hold traits critical to helping the world's favorite fruit survive climate change, pests and diseases (2020-11-06)

For quick COVID-19 testing, iSCAN can
A new test kit could enable quick and effective COVID-19 tests for people arriving at airports. (2020-11-05)

From hard to soft: making sponges from mussel shells
Scientists have discovered a spongy form of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), a material found in limestone, chalk, marble, and the shells of mussels and other shellfish. While most forms of calcium carbonate are hard minerals, this new form is soft and absorbent. The researchers, reporting November 5 in the journal Matter, made the discovery while exploring new uses for leftover mussel shells. (2020-11-05)

Blue phosphorus: How a semiconductor becomes a metal
Blue phosphorus, an atomically thin synthetic semiconductor, becomes metallic as soon as it is converted into a double layer. This has been discovered by an interdisciplinary team led by Prof Thomas Heine from TU Dresden and Prof Gabriel Merino from the Mexican research institute Cinvestav Merida. The scientists are first to describe the possibility of constructing nanoscale, highly efficient transistors consisting of only one element. (2020-11-05)

Virus that causes COVID-19 puts a plug in cellular defenses
One of the novel coronavirus' most insidious tricks is that it can block the ability of cells to produce protective proteins without hindering its own ability to replicate. A new Yale study reveals how it does it. (2020-11-05)

A material that "bruises"like the skin?
Human skin bruises when the tissue and muscle in the area suffer trauma or become damaged due to an application of blunt force. when an object suffers an impact that is expected to damage, If the areas damaged by a physical impact undergo a change in color, just like human skin, it will be easy to distinguish what needs to be repaired. (2020-11-04)

Expensive gene therapies raise challenges and opportunities: Expert panel report
Gene therapies are being approved for use in Canada, but could strain healthcare budgets and exacerbate existing treatment inequities across the country. However, there are opportunities to control spending, streamline approvals and support fair access through innovation, coordination and collaboration, according to a new expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA). (2020-11-03)

NUS researchers invent flexible and highly reliable sensor
Known as Tactile Resistive Annularly Cracked E-Skin (TRACE), this novel sensor material developed by the National University of Singapore researchers is five times better than conventional soft materials, and could be used in wearable health technology devices, or in robotics to perceive surface texture. (2020-11-02)

Boosting the capacity of supercapacitors
Carefully designed covalent organic frameworks could make supercapacitor electrodes that have a greater ability to store electric charge. (2020-11-01)

Study finds 5 distinct dog types from 11,000 years ago
An international team of researchers that includes a Texas A&M University professor has studied the lineage of dogs and found that there were at least five different types of dogs as far back as 11,000 years ago. (2020-10-29)

Liquid nanofoam: A game changer for future football helmets
A liquid nanofoam liner undergoing testing could prolong the safe use of football helmets, says a Michigan State University researcher. (2020-10-28)

Tailoring 2D materials to improve electronic and optical devices
New possibilities for future developments in electronic and optical devices have been unlocked by recent advancements in two-dimensional (2D) materials, according to Penn State researchers. (2020-10-27)

Scientists from NUST MISIS manage to improve metallic glasses
Researchers at National University of Science and Technology MISIS (NUST MISIS) have managed to develop a unique method to process bulk metallic glasses. According to the authors of the study, they have managed to find processing conditions that significantly improve the quality of this promising material. The research results were published in Journal of Alloys and Compounds. (2020-10-23)

OSIRIS-REx TAGs surface of asteroid Bennu
Captured on Oct. 20, 2020 during the OSIRIS-REx mission's Touch-And-Go (TAG) sample collection event, this series of images shows the SamCam imager's field of view as the NASA spacecraft approaches and touches down on asteroid Bennu's surface, over 200 million miles away from Earth. (2020-10-22)

How do snakes 'see' in the dark? Researchers have an answer
Certain species of snake -- think pit vipers, boa constrictors and pythons, among others -- are able to find and capture prey with uncanny accuracy, even in total darkness. Now scientists have discovered how these creatures are able to convert the heat from organisms that are warmer than their ambient surroundings into electrical signals, allowing them to 'see' in the dark. (2020-10-21)

A new material for separating CO2 from industrial waste gases, natural gas, or biogas
With the new material, developed at the University of Bayreuth, the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) can be specifically separated from industrial waste gases, natural gas, or biogas, and thereby made available for recycling. The separation process is both energy efficient and cost-effective. (2020-10-20)

Pinpointing the 'silent' mutations that gave the coronavirus an evolutionary edge
We know that the coronavirus behind the COVID-19 crisis lived harmlessly in bats and other wildlife before it jumped the species barrier and spilled over to humans. Now, researchers at Duke University have identified a number of ''silent'' mutations in the roughly 30,000 letters of the virus's genetic code that helped it thrive once it made the leap -- and possibly helped set the stage for the global pandemic. (2020-10-16)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.