Current Genetics News and Events

Current Genetics News and Events, Genetics News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Genetic determinants of fertility and ongoing natural selection in humans
A recent study presented at the ASHG 2020 Virtual Meeting suggests genetic variants may be associated with reproductive success. (2020-10-29)

Genetic predisposition to increased weight is protective for breast and prostate cancer
A research study presented at the ASHG 2020 Virtual Meeting suggests that found that increasing weight is causally protective for breast and prostate cancer. (2020-10-26)

Cell-Free DNA provides a dynamic window into health
A new study presented at the ASHG 2020 Virtual Meeting shows how cfDNA testing can be used to provide insight into a patient's health. (2020-10-26)

Breast cancer risk and disease-causing mutations in women over age 65
In a new study presented at the ASHG 2020 Virtual Meeting, researchers investigated the prevalence of disease-causing variants in established breast cancer predisposition genes in women over age 65. (2020-10-26)

Insights into the genetic architecture of penicillin allergy
In a study presented at the ASHG 2020 Annual Meeting, researchers found that thehistocompatibility complex gene HLA-B in penicillin allergy. (2020-10-26)

Gut bacteria in multiple sclerosis: Probiotic or commensal, good or bad?
Though evidence suggests that the gut microbiome modulates risk of multiple sclerosis, new findings from the University of Vermont highlight complex interactions between host genetics and environmental factors impact susceptibility to multiple sclerosis. Strategies to prevent or treat multiple sclerosis should take into account host genetics, the pre-existing gut microbiome, and the timing or mode of the intervention. (2020-10-19)

Classic optical illusion leads to the discovery of critical neurons in zebrafish.
By exposing larval zebrafish to a well-known optical illusion, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology and National Institute of Genetics have found a clever way to isolate key clusters of neurons critical to processing the direction of motion in the zebrafish's environment. The full results were published in the journal Neuron in September 2020. (2020-10-15)

New cause of syndromic microcephaly identified
A team of international collaborators identifies a new cause of syndromic microcephaly caused by LMNB1 mutations that disrupt the nuclear envelope. The report is published in the October issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics. (2020-09-17)

Mount Sinai study shows widespread epigenetic defects in the human genome
This study shows, for the first time, that epigenetic defects in the human genome are widespread, and occur at hundreds of genes known to cause genetic diseases. (2020-09-15)

Addicted to the sun? Research shows it's in your genes
Sun-seeking behaviour is linked to genes involved in addiction, behavioural and personality traits and brain function, according to a study of more than 260,000 people led by King's College London researchers. (2020-09-10)

Why the 'wimpy' Y chromosome hasn't evolved out of existence
The Y chromosome has shrunken drastically over 200 million years of evolution. Even those who study it have used the word ''wimpy'' to describe it, and yet it continues to stick around. An Opinion paper publishing on August 6, 2020 in the journal Trends in Genetics outlines a new theory--called the 'persistent Y hypothesis'--to explain why the Y chromosome may be more resilient than it first appears. (2020-08-06)

European maize highlights the hidden differences within a species
Maize is one of our major staple foods and is cultivated around the world, showcasing a broad range of genetic adaptations to different environmental conditions. To date, the best understood maize line is the American dent maize line B73. Scientists have now expanded our knowledge of the maize genome through the analysis of four European flint lines. The found genetic differences between the lines illustrate the importance of looking at the pangenome of a crop, when working with its genetics. (2020-07-27)

Metabolomics meets genomics to improve patient diagnosis
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have improved their ability to identify the genetic cause of undiagnosed conditions. (2020-07-07)

The best parents: Genetically as divergent as possible with similar preferences
The more diverse in genetics, than better. But only in cases of similar preferences. A team of researchers led by IPK Gatersleben has succeeded in providing answers to a long unsolved question in the breeding of plant hybrids. (2020-06-12)

Interpreting DTC testing results imposes a major burden on genetics services
A study from Australia finds that because patients are increasingly approaching GPs about the results of direct-to consumer genetic testing, and GPs are ill-equipped to advise them, this is having an impact on already overloaded clinical genetics services. (2020-06-05)

The interface of genomic information with the electronic health record
In an effort to provide practical guidance and important considerations regarding how genomic information can be incorporated into electronic health records, the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) has released, 'The interface of genomic information with the electronic health record: a points to consider statement of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG).' (2020-06-01)

ACMG updates seminal laboratory standard on CFTR variant testing
This technical standard includes revised information about CF and the CFTR gene, new testing considerations and methodologies, and updated recommendations for the interpretation and reporting of test results. Written in clearly delineated sections, this important new resource will become a well-used reference by molecular genetics laboratories everywhere. (2020-05-14)

New software supports decision-making for breeding
Researchers at the University of Göttingen have developed an innovative software program for the simulation of breeding programmes. The ''Modular Breeding Program Simulator'' (MoBPS) enables the simulation of complex breeding programmes in animal and plant breeding and is designed to assist breeders in their everyday decisions. In addition to economic criteria in breeding, the research team strives for goals such as sustainability, conservation of genetic diversity and improved animal welfare. The research appeared in G3 Genes, Genomes, Genetics. (2020-05-12)

Mutations in SARS-CoV-2 offer insights into virus evolution
By analyzing virus genomes from over 7,500 people infected with COVID-19, a UCL-led research team has characterized patterns of diversity of SARS-CoV-2 virus genome, offering clues to direct drugs and vaccine targets, in a study published today in Infection, Genetics and Evolution. (2020-05-05)

Scientists explore links between genetics, gut microbiome and memory
Scientists have traced the molecular connections between genetics, the gut microbiome and memory in a mouse model bred to resemble the diversity of the human population. Researchers from two US Department of Energy national laboratories identified lactate, a molecule produced by all species of one gut microbe, as a key memory-boosting molecular messenger. (2020-04-29)

Genetic variation not an obstacle to gene drive strategy to control mosquitoes
New research from entomologists at UC Davis clears a potential obstacle to using CRISPR-Cas9 'gene drive' technology to control mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever and Zika. (2020-04-16)

Why do so many pregnancies and in vitro fertilization attempts fail?
Scientists have created a mathematical model that can help explain why so many pregnancies and in vitro fertilization attempts fail. The Rutgers-led study, which may help to improve fertility, is published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-04-13)

Genetic processes that determine short-sightedness discovered by researchers
Three previously unknown genetic mechanisms have been discovered in causing myopia otherwise known as short or near-sightedness, finds a new study. (2020-03-31)

Removing belly fat before it sticks to you
University of Cincinnati researchers are producing in the lab a human protein tasked with removing triglycerides from the blood stream. Unlocking the secrets of human protein APOA 5 gives us a leg up in treating heart disease. (2020-03-19)

Genetic study offers comprehensive and diverse view of recent US population history
Researchers have assembled one of the most comprehensive studies of population genetics ever conducted in the United States, bringing together large-scale genetics data from more than 32,000 participants in the National Geographic Genographic Project. This new view on the US, appearing March 5 in the American Journal of Human Genetics, reveals a remarkable degree of complexity and has important implications for health and medicine, the researchers say. (2020-03-05)

Scientists find functioning amyloid in healthy brain
The generation of amyloids, a special form of fibrillar proteins, is believed to result in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. However, it has been found that in healthy neurons FRX1 protein in amyloid form controls memory and emotion. (2020-03-02)

Unilateral terms of service change may put health-tech consumer welfare at risk
Given the intimate nature of the data handled by health technology companies, Jessica Roberts and Jim Hawkins argue, in this Policy Forum, for stronger consumer protections. (2020-02-13)

Genetic variants reduce risk of Alzheimer's disease
A DNA study of over 10,000 people by UCL scientists has identified a class of gene variants that appear to protect against Alzheimer's disease. (2020-02-04)

Hemp 'goes hot' due to genetics, not growing conditions
As the hemp industry grows, producers face the risk of cultivating a crop that can become unusable -- and illegal -- if it develops too much of the psychoactive chemical THC. Cornell University researchers have determined that a hemp plant's propensity to 'go hot' -- become too high in THC -- is determined by genetics, not as a stress response to growing conditions, contrary to popular belief. (2020-01-30)

Schizophrenia genetics analyzed in South African Xhosa
Schizophrenia genetics was studied in the Xhosa population because Africa is the birthplace of all humans, yet ancestral African populations are rarely part of genetics research. Schizophrenia affects about 1% of the world's people and is a leading cause of disability. This study revealed that Xhosa individuals with schizophrenia are significantly more likely to carry rare, damaging genetic mutations compared to Xhosas without severe mental illness. The disrupted genes are likely involved in neuron synapse organization and function. (2020-01-30)

Genetics of schizophrenia in South African Xhosa informs understanding for all human populations
In the first genetic analysis of schizophrenia in an ancestral African population, the South African Xhosa, researchers report that individuals with schizophrenia are more likely to carry rare damaging genetic mutations than those who are well. (2020-01-30)

New clues into the genetic origins of schizophrenia
The first genetic analysis of schizophrenia in an ancestral African population, the South African Xhosa, appears in the Jan. 31 issue of the journal Science. An international group of scientists conducted the research, including investigators from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and New York State Psychiatric Institute, as well as the University of Cape Town and the University of Washington. (2020-01-30)

ASHG survey finds Americans strongly support human genetics research and potential
Americans are excited and optimistic about genetics and its emerging health applications, per a new survey by ASHG and Research!America. - Most Americans agree genetic knowledge will be important to their health - Americans agree more research is needed and increased federal funding for it is important. - Results confirm importance of confidentiality and security of research data, addressing Americans' views on genetic testing coverage, and highlighting opposition to using genetics for insurance coverage/rate-setting. (2020-01-29)

The use of fetal exome sequencing in prenatal diagnosis: A new ACMG Points to Consider
A new Points to Consider document from ACMG aims to assist referring physicians, laboratory geneticists, genetic counselors and other medical professionals in understanding the complexity and implications of exome sequencing in prenatal care. Published in ACMG's official journal Genetics in Medicine, the document, 'The Use of Fetal Exome Sequencing in Prenatal Diagnosis: A Points to Consider Document of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG),' is also intended to guide clinical laboratories. (2020-01-08)

Does evidence support BRCA1/2 & other genetic testing for patients with breast cancer?
Should germline genetic testing be offered to all patients with breast cancer? The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) addresses this important question in a new statement published in Genetics in Medicine, 'Points to Consider: Is There Evidence to Support BRCA1/2 and Other Inherited Breast Cancer Genetic Testing for All Breast Cancer Patients? A Statement of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics.' (2019-12-13)

New drugs more likely to be approved if backed up by genetics
A new drug candidate is more likely to be approved for use if it targets a gene known to be linked to the disease; a finding that can help pharmaceutical companies to focus their drug development efforts. Emily King and colleagues from AbbVie report these findings in a new study published Dec. 12 in PLOS Genetics. (2019-12-12)

Breast cancer patients to be evaluated for genetic testing
The guidance from the ACMG differs from a consensus guideline issued in February by the American Society of Breast Surgeons, which recommended genetic testing for all newly diagnosed patients with breast cancer. The ACMG recommends evaluations before genetic testing. (2019-12-12)

Intestinal stem cell genes may link dietary fat and colon cancer
Two genes that appear to help stem cells in the intestine burn dietary fat may play a role in colon cancer, according to a Rutgers study. The study, published in the journal Gastroenterology, describes a new connection between the way cells consume fat and how genes regulate stem cell behavior in the intestines of mice. (2019-11-25)

Mapping millet genetics
New DNA sequences will aid in the development of improved millet varieties (2019-10-23)

Researchers quantify Cas9-caused off-target mutagenesis in mice
Scientists are finding new ways to improve the use of the CRISPR enzyme Cas9 and reduce the chances of off-target mutations in laboratory mice, according to new results from a research collaboration. The findings, which help scientists contextualize a common concern related to gene editing and identify new strategies to improve its precision, were presented as a featured plenary abstract at the American Society of Human Genetics 2019 Annual Meeting in Houston. (2019-10-18)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.