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Current Genome News and Events, Genome News Articles.
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Born to be a cannibal: Genes for feeding behavior in mandarin fish identified
Some mandarin fish species (Sinipercidae) are pure fish-eaters, which feed exclusively on living juvenile fish - also of their own species. (2020-07-09)
New genomic atlas of the developing human brain
Researchers at Gladstone Institutes and UC San Francisco (UCSF) Weill Institute for Neurosciences have created a comprehensive region-specific atlas of the regulatory regions of the genome linked to human embryonic brain development. (2020-06-30)
Breaking the silence: scientists investigate epigenetic impact across whole genome
Researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have uncovered a clue to the mystery of how epigenetic regulation impacts the entire plant genome, by looking at how plant cells suppress transcription - the first stage of how genes manufacture their products. (2020-06-30)
Dynamics of DNA replication revealed at the nanoscale
Using super-resolution technology a University of Technology Sydney led team has directly visualised the process of DNA replication in single human cells. (2020-06-25)
When two are better than one: Why some gene duplicates are retained while others perish
Most duplicated gene copies either evolve new roles or lose their ability to code for proteins. (2020-06-25)
Scientists create program that finds synteny blocks in different animals
Scientists developed a software tool that makes it possible to quickly and efficiently find similar parts in the genomes of different animals, which is essential for understanding how closely related two species are, and how far they have evolved from their common ancestor. (2020-06-23)
Bread mould avoids infection by mutating its own DNA
Whilst most organisms try to stop their DNA from mutating, scientists from the UK and China have discovered that a common fungus found on bread actively mutates its own DNA as a way of fighting virus-like infections. (2020-06-22)
Study finds 'dark matter' DNA is vital for rice reproduction
Researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have shed light on the reproductive role of 'dark matter' DNA - non-coding DNA sequences that previously seemed to have no function. (2020-06-19)
Researchers take a bloody good look at the medicinal leech genome
An international team of researchers, led by Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) scientist Sebastian Kvist, have announced the completion and results of their work to sequence the genome of Hirudo medicinalis, a European leech, and one of the most prominently used medicinal species. (2020-06-18)
The origins of measles: Virus diverged from cattle-infecting relative earlier than thought in history
The measles virus diverged from a closely related cattle-infecting virus in approximately the sixth century BCE - around 1,400 years earlier than current estimates - according to a new study of dozens of measles genomes. (2020-06-18)
Chinese scientists construct high-quality graph-based soybean genome
Recently, the research group led by Prof. TIAN Zhixi from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology (IGDB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), in cooperation with Profs. (2020-06-17)
Summer favorite bitter gourd genome shows unusual domestication, insight into evolution
The genomic architecture of the Long-read bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) has been elucidated to show nonclassic domestication. (2020-06-16)
NIST develops benchmark for detecting large genetic mutations linked to major diseases
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a way for laboratories to determine how accurately they can detect large mutations. (2020-06-15)
New method to identify genes that can drive development of brain tumors
Researchers at Uppsala University have developed a method for identifying functional mutations and their effect on genes relevant to the development of glioblastoma. (2020-06-09)
Putting COVID-19 diagnostic tests to the 'test' -- how do they hold up?
As SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to mutate, it is important to check the efficacy of current diagnostic tests, say York University researchers, who found seven out of 27 methods had potential sequence mismatch issues that may lead to underperforming or false-negative COVID-19 test results. (2020-06-09)
First systematic report on the tug-of-war between DNA damage and repair
IBS scientists have screened almost 163,000 DNA mutations in 2,700 C. elegans roundworms to shed light on DNA damage. (2020-06-08)
3-D shape of human genome essential for robust inflammatory response
The three-dimensional structure of the human genome is essential for providing a rapid and robust inflammatory response but is surprisingly not vital for reprogramming one cell type into another. (2020-06-08)
Intestinal health: Dresden research team identifies enzyme essential for stem cell survival
Which pathways govern intestinal epithelial differentiation under constitutive conditions? Epithelial differentiation is largely controlled by the tissue-specific activity of transcription factors. (2020-06-08)
New role assigned to a human protein in transcription and genome stability
DNA-RNA hybrids, or R loops, are structures that generate genomic instability, a common feature of tumor cells. (2020-06-04)
redHUMAN: Deciphering links between genes and metabolism
Scientists at EPFL have developed a new method that simplifies the processing of genetic-metabolic data by picking up changes in metabolism, a hallmark of numerous diseases like cancer and Alzheimer's. (2020-06-04)
Successful detailed tracking of major plant disease's global spread
Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their Oregon State University collaborators have developed a new, highly detailed genetic way to trace the spread of Agrobacterium, one of the world's most important bacterial plant pathogens, according to research just published in Science. (2020-06-04)
Small study demonstrates sample inactivation may lead to SARS-CoV-2 false negatives
A team of investigators led by Chaofeng Ma of Xi'an Center for Disease Control and Prevention hypothesized that viral inactivation may contribute to false negatives. (2020-06-02)
Genome evolution goes digital
Dr. Alan Herbert from InsideOutBio describes ground-breaking research in a paper published online by Royal Society Open Science. (2020-06-02)
The most common organism in the oceans harbors a virus in its DNA
The most common organism in the world's oceans -- and possibly the whole planet -- harbors a virus in its DNA. (2020-05-29)
Problems with alcohol? 29 gene variants may explain why
A genome-wide analysis of more than 435,000 people has identified 29 genetic variants linked to problematic drinking, researchers at Yale University School of Medicine and colleagues report May 25 in the journal Nature Neuroscience. (2020-05-25)
MetaviralSPAdes -- New assembler for virus genomes
There was no specialized viral metagenome assembler until recently. But the joint team of Russian and US researchers from Saint-Petersburg State University and University of California at San Diego just released the metaviralSPAdes assembler (published in journal Bioinformatics on May 16) that turns the analysis of the metavirome sequencing results into an easy task. (2020-05-25)
Algal genome provides insights into first land plants
Cornell researchers have sequenced and analyzed the genome of a single-celled alga that belongs to the closest lineage to terrestrial plants and provides many clues to how aquatic plants first colonized land. (2020-05-22)
The genome of chimpanzees and gorillas could help to better understand human tumors
A new study by researchers from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE), a joint center of UPF and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), shows that, surprisingly, the distribution of mutations in human tumors is more similar to that of chimpanzees and gorillas than that of humans. (2020-05-21)
Scientists find out which of the metazoans has the smallest known genome
Researchers at St Petersburg University have deciphered the Intoshia variabili gene, the smallest representative of the parasite from the Orthonectida group. (2020-05-20)
Enzymes edit SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the body, perhaps fueling the virus' evolution
Two human deaminase enzymes edit the RNA of the SARS-CoV-2 virus when it enters a patient's body, with implications for the evolution of the virus and the spread of the infection, according to a new study. (2020-05-18)
Uncovering how 'dark matter' regions of the genome affect inflammatory diseases
A study led by researchers at the Babraham Institute in collaboration with the Wellcome Sanger Institute has uncovered how variations in a non-protein coding 'dark matter' region of the genome could make patients susceptible to complex autoimmune and allergic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease. (2020-05-13)
New technique delivers complete DNA sequences of chromosomes inherited from mother and father
An international team of scientists led by the University of Adelaide's Davies Research Centre has shown that it is possible to disentangle the DNA sequences of the chromosomes inherited from the mother and the father, to create true diploid genomes from a single individual. (2020-05-06)
'Unnecessary' genetic complexity: A spanner in the works?
The promise of personalized medicine has not fully materialized, say two McMaster researchers, because the full sophistication of the genetic blueprint has a more complex and far-reaching influence on human health than scientists had first realized. (2020-05-04)
Gladstone scientists identify a new potential reservoir of latent HIV
In a recent paper in PLOS Pathogens, Gladstone Visiting Scientist Nadia Roan, Ph.D., and her team describe a class of cells that preferentially support latent infection by HIV. (2020-04-30)
HKUST researchers unlock genomic secrets of scaly-foot snail
Researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have decoded for the first time the genome of Scaly-foot Snail, a rare snail inhabited in what scientists called 'the origin of life'- deep-sea hydrothermal vents characterized with impossible living condition. (2020-04-28)
Herpes virus decoded
The genome of the herpes simplex virus 1 was decoded using new methods. (2020-04-27)
Rapid evolution in fish: genomic changes within a generation
Researchers from Basel have identified the genetic basis of rapid adaptation using a native fish species. (2020-04-27)
Skoltech research shows how a 'Swiss Army knife' protein helps phages disarm their victims
Researchers from the Severinov Laboratory at Skoltech, along with their colleagues from Switzerland and Israel, have investigated a poorly studied bacterial BREX defense mechanism to show that it can be ''turned off'' by a multipurpose viral protein that successfully impersonates DNA. (2020-04-27)
Breakthrough in genome visualization
Kadir Dede and Dr. Enno Ohlebusch at Ulm University in Germany have devised a method for constructing pan-genome subgraphs at different granularities without having to wait hours and days on end for the software to process the entire genome. (2020-04-23)
CSIRO unlocks new way to understand evolving strains of SARS-CoV-2
Researchers from CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, have unveiled a new approach to analysing the genetic codes -- or the blueprint -- of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19. (2020-04-19)
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