Nav: Home

Current Genome News and Events

Current Genome News and Events, Genome News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
First complete German shepherd DNA offers new tool to fight disease
The DNA sequencing of a healthy German shepherd offers scientists new insight into the evolution of the domestic dog while also enabling dogs to be screened for hip and other diseases much more accurately. (2020-04-01)
Modern humans, Neanderthals share a tangled genetic history, study affirms
A new study reinforces the concept that Neanderthal DNA has been woven into the modern human genome on multiple occasions as our ancestors met Neanderthals time and again in different parts of the world. (2020-04-01)
Cancer research, the guardian of the genome has a new ally
They identified a protein that, like a switch, controls the onset of cell death processes in cancer cells, which are regulated by p53, the protein known as 'the guardian of the genome.' The findings will be used to develop more tailored and effective cancer treatments. (2020-03-31)
A pilot study of the sequencing of the intestinal microbiota for colon cancer
In this study, they compare two sequencing methods and design a bioinformatic analysis to establish the basis of a wide study in the research of early detection markers of colon cancer. (2020-03-31)
Sturgeon genome sequenced
Sturgeons lived on earth already 300 million years ago and yet their external appearance seems to have undergone very little change. (2020-03-30)
Unconstrained genome targeting with CRISPR-Cas9 variants less reliant on PAM
Addressing a fundamental limitation in CRISPR-Cas genome editing, researchers have developed new engineered Cas9 variants that nearly eliminate the need for a protospacer adjacent motif known as PAM. (2020-03-26)
Worldwide scientific collaboration unveils genetic architecture of gray matter
For the first time, more 360 scientists from 184 different institutions -- including UNC-Chapel Hill -- have contributed to a global effort to find more than 200 regions of the genome and more than 300 specific genetic variations that affect the structure of the cerebral cortex and likely play important roles in psychiatric and neurological conditions. (2020-03-26)
Bacteria play 'rummy' with genes, UofSC biologist shows
New research by a University of South Carolina biologist shows that when bacteria take on new DNA through horizontal gene transfer, they simultaneously shed DNA at the same time. (2020-03-17)
Scientists can now edit multiple genome fragments at a time
Toronto scientists have developed CHyMErA, a new CRISPR-based tool for more versatile genome editing applications to help shed light on how multiple genes cooperate in health and disease. (2020-03-16)
Scientists optimize prime editing for rice and wheat
Recently, a research team led by Prof. GAO Caixia of the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the optimization of a prime editing system (PPE system) for creating desired point mutations, insertions and deletions in two major cereal crops, namely, rice and wheat. (2020-03-16)
How sperm unpack dad's genome so it can merge with mom's
UC San Diego researchers discover the enzyme SPRK1's role in reorganizing the paternal genome during the first moments of fertilization -- a finding that might help explain infertility cases of unknown cause. (2020-03-13)
Clemson geneticists' collaborative research sheds light on 'dark' portion of genome
Clemson University faculty Robert Anholt and Trudy Mackay have recently published work that identifies new portions of the fruit fly genome that, until now, have been hidden in 'dark' silent areas. (2020-03-11)
UMD researcher establishes a new viable CRISPR-Cas12b system for plant genome engineering
In a new publication in Nature Plants, assistant professor of Plant Science at the University of Maryland Yiping Qi has established a new CRISPR genome engineering system as viable in plants for the first time: CRISPR-Cas12b. (2020-03-09)
Food scientists slice time off salmonella identification process
Researchers from Cornell University, the Mars Global Food Safety Center in Beijing, and the University of Georgia have developed a method for completing whole-genome sequencing to determine salmonella serotypes in just two hours and the whole identification process within eight hours. (2020-03-05)
Genome editing strategy could improve rice, other crops
Scientists at the University of California, Davis, have used CRISPR technology to genetically engineer rice with high levels of beta-carotene, the precursor of vitamin A. (2020-03-04)
Red panda population genomics confirms two phylogenetic species and different evolutionary histories
A research team led by Prof. WEI Fuwen from the Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, used population genomics methods to analyze the genome resequencing data of 65 wild red pandas from seven geographical populations; mitochondrial genomes of 49 red pandas; and Y chromosome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from 49 male individuals. (2020-03-03)
New Cas9 variant makes genome editing even more precise
Researchers develop more specific CRISPR-Cas9 gene scissors. (2020-03-03)
Biologists capture fleeting interactions between regulatory proteins and their genome-wide targets
New York University biologists captured highly transient interactions between transcription factors -- proteins that control gene expression -- and target genes in the genome and showed that these typically missed interactions have important practical implications. (2020-03-02)
New RNA mapping technique shows how RNA interacts with chromatin in the genome
A group led by scientists from the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS) in Japan have developed a new method, RADICL-seq, which allows scientists to better understand how RNA interacts with the genome through chromatin--the structure in which the genome is organized. (2020-02-25)
Tel Aviv University researchers discover unique non-oxygen breathing animal
Researchers at Tel Aviv University (TAU) have discovered a non-oxygen breathing animal. (2020-02-25)
Scientists develop algorithm for researching evolution of species with WGD
An international team of scientists from ITMO University and George Washington University (USA) created an algorithm for studying the evolutionary history of species with whole-genome duplications, chiefly yeast and plants. (2020-02-25)
Veggie-loving fish could be the new white meat
A secret to survival amid rising global temperatures could be dwelling in the tidepools of the US West Coast. (2020-02-19)
Discovery may illuminate a missing link between atherosclerosis and aging
Using a preclinical model of atherosclerosis, Feinberg and colleagues have uncovered a long, noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that may point the way toward new therapies for atherosclerosis and shed light on why the likelihood of the disease increases with age. (2020-02-19)
Computer-generated genomes
Professor Beat Christen, ETH Zurich to speak in the AAAS 2020 session, 'Synthetic Biology: Digital Design of Living Systems.' Christen will describe how computational algorithms paired with chemical DNA synthesis enable digital manufacturing of biological systems up to the size of entire microbial genomes. (2020-02-14)
Huge bacteria-eating viruses found in DNA from gut of pregnant women and Tibetan hot spring
University of Melbourne and the University of California, Berkeley, scientists have discovered hundreds of unusually large, bacteria-killing viruses with capabilities normally associated with living organisms. (2020-02-13)
How a tiny and strange marine animal produces unlimited eggs and sperm over its lifetime
During human embryonic development, a small pool of germ cells that will eventually become gametes is set aside, and all sperm or eggs that humans produce during their lives are the descendants of those original few germ cells. (2020-02-13)
Understanding recent US mumps outbreaks
A single strain of mumps virus has dominated the US since 2006, and is responsible for many of the large numbers of cases seen across the country in the widespread 2016-17 outbreaks. (2020-02-11)
Why the goby can conquer the waters of the world
The round goby, one of the most common invasive freshwater fish in the world, boasts a particularly robust immune system, which could be one of the reasons for its excellent adaptability. (2020-02-11)
New repair mechanism for DNA breaks
Researchers from the University of Seville and the Andalusian Centre of Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine (CABIMER) have identified new factors that are necessary for the repair of these breaks. (2020-02-10)
Study resurrects mammoth DNA to explore the cause of their extinction
A new study in Genome Biology and Evolution, published by Oxford University Press, resurrected the mutated genes of the last herd of woolly mammoths and found that their small population had developed a number of genetic defects that may have proved fatal for the species. (2020-02-07)
Global study maps cancer mutations in large catalogue
Mutations in 38 different types of cancer have been mapped by means of whole genome analysis by an international team of researchers from, amongst others, the University of Copenhagen, Aarhus University, Aarhus University Hospital, and Rigshospitalet. (2020-02-06)
NYU scientists sequence the genome of basmati rice
Using an innovative genome sequencing technology, researchers assembled the complete genetic blueprint of two basmati rice varieties, including one that is drought-tolerant and resistant to bacterial disease. (2020-02-05)
Viruses and cancer -- systematic overview published
Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center systematically investigated the DNA of more than 2,600 tumor samples from patients with 38 different types of cancer to discover traces of viruses -- which they found in 13% of the samples studied. (2020-02-05)
A close-up look at mutated DNA in cancer cells
PCAWG, the largest cancer research consortium in the world, has set itself the task of improving our understanding of genetic mutations in tumors. (2020-02-05)
Unprecedented exploration generates most comprehensive map of cancer genomes to date
An international team has completed the most comprehensive study of whole cancer genomes to date, significantly improving our fundamental understanding of cancer and signposting new directions for its diagnosis and treatment. (2020-02-05)
First comprehensive survey of virus DNA found within cancer cells
Researchers have carried out the first comprehensive survey of viruses found within different types of cancer. (2020-02-05)
Chromothripsis in human cancer
Newly discovered mutational phenomenon chromothripsis is prevalent across more cancers than previously thought. (2020-02-05)
Scientists identify new genetic drivers of cancer
Analysis of whole cancer genomes gives key insights into the role of the non-coding genome in cancer. (2020-02-05)
Studying DNA rearrangement to understand cancer
Using the dataset from the Pan-Cancer project, a team including EMBL scientists has developed methods to group, classify, and describe structural variants -- large rearrangements of the genome that are a key driver of cancer. (2020-02-05)
Cancer mutations occur decades before diagnosis
A large-scale pan-cancer analysis of the evolutionary history of tumours reveals that cancer-causing mutations occur decades before diagnosis. (2020-02-05)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 3: Shared Immunity
More than a million people have caught Covid-19, and tens of thousands have died. But thousands more have survived and recovered. A week or so ago (aka, what feels like ten years in corona time) producer Molly Webster learned that many of those survivors possess a kind of superpower: antibodies trained to fight the virus. Not only that, they might be able to pass this power on to the people who are sick with corona, and still in the fight. Today we have the story of an experimental treatment that's popping up all over the country: convalescent plasma transfusion, a century-old procedure that some say may become one of our best weapons against this devastating, new disease.   If you have recovered from Covid-19 and want to donate plasma, national and local donation registries are gearing up to collect blood.  To sign up with the American Red Cross, a national organization that works in local communities, head here.  To find out more about the The National COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Project, which we spoke about in our episode, including information on clinical trials or plasma donation projects in your community, go here.  And if you are in the greater New York City area, and want to donate convalescent plasma, head over to the New York Blood Center to sign up. Or, register with specific NYC hospitals here.   If you are sick with Covid-19, and are interested in participating in a clinical trial, or are looking for a plasma donor match, check in with your local hospital, university, or blood center for more; you can also find more information on trials at The National COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Project. And lastly, Tatiana Prowell's tweet that tipped us off is here. This episode was reported by Molly Webster and produced by Pat Walters. Special thanks to Drs. Evan Bloch and Tim Byun, as well as the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.