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Current Genomes News and Events

Current Genomes News and Events, Genomes News Articles.
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New software tool could provide answers to some of life's most intriguing questions
A University of Waterloo researcher has spearheaded the development of a software tool that can provide conclusive answers to some of the world's most fascinating questions. (2019-04-17)
Genome analysis showed common origin of Pskov, Novgorod and Yakutia populations
Scientists for the first time compared complete genome data of different ethnic groups in Russia. (2019-04-17)
Finding the key to flightlessness
Based on the analysis of the genomes of more than a dozen flightless birds, including an extinct moa, a team led by Harvard researchers found that while different species show wide variety in the protein-coding portions of their genome, they appear to turn to the same regulatory pathways when evolving flight loss. (2019-04-17)
Bacteria-infecting viruses exacerbate chronic infections in cystic fibrosis
A study of samples from 92 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has revealed that certain bacteriophages -- viruses that infect bacteria -- worsen the severity of bacterial infections associated with the disorder. (2019-04-17)
New research identifies microbes that may reduce allergy-like reactions in many people
A small percentage of humans can suffer allergy-like reactions to certain varieties of ripened cheese due to histamine, a byproduct of the prolonged fermentation process. (2019-04-16)
A thorough characterization of structural variants in human genomes
Human genomes vary quite a bit from individual to individual. (2019-04-16)
What makes a jellyfish?
Genomic study reveals how jellyfish develop into floating beauties, rather than staying stationary like corals or sea anemones. (2019-04-15)
Ancient DNA reveals new branches of the Denisovan family tree
A study examining DNA fragments passed down from these ancient hominins to modern people living in Island Southeast Asia and New Guinea now suggests that the ancestry of Papuans includes not just one but two distinct Denisovan lineages, separated from each other for hundreds of thousands of years. (2019-04-11)
Multiple Denisovan-related ancestries in Papuans
Researchers examined DNA fragments passed down from Neanderthals and Denisovans to modern people living in Island Southeast Asia and New Guinea and found: the ancestry of Papuans includes not just one but two distinct Denisovan lineages, which had been separated from each other for hundreds of thousands of years. (2019-04-11)
How a once friendly bacteria evolved into a hospital-infecting strain in Wisconsin
A genetic study of an outbreak of Enterococcus faecalis -- a leading cause of drug-resistant bacterial infections -- in a hospital has revealed how the organism became resistant to new antibiotics and adapted to infect the human bloodstream. (2019-04-10)
Digging ancient signals out of modern human genomes
Trying to find ancient DNA, let alone prove that the ancient DNA is ancestral to a population living today, is extremely challenging. (2019-04-05)
Peptide keeps predatory nematodes from eating their kin
A small peptide produced in the skin of predatory nematodes prevents them from cannibalizing their immediate family members, while they feed upon their close relatives, a new study finds. (2019-04-04)
Noncoding DNA drives the convergent loss of flight in flightless birds
Tucked away in the noncoding regions of bird DNA, researchers have discovered molecular roots of the loss of flight seen in so many disparate paleognathous birds. (2019-04-04)
Saffron comes from Attica -- origin of the saffron crocus traced back to Greece
Crocus sativus, a small plain purple flower with three bright red stigmas, not unlike the crocus flowers which seem omnipresent in springtime, only much more valuable. (2019-04-02)
The evolution of bird-of-paradise sex chromosomes revealed
Birds-of-paradise are a group of songbird species, and are known for their magnificent male plumage and bewildering sexual display. (2019-04-01)
UTA biologist shows new insights into chromosome evolution, venom regulation in snakes
In a new paper, a team of biologists addressed genomic questions by generating and analyzing the first most complete chromosome-level genome for a snake -- the prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis). (2019-03-29)
Okinawan sea grapes reveal secrets of plant evolution
Scientists decoded the genome of the popular Okinawan seaweed 'umi-budo' or 'sea grapes,' which could help ease the crop's cultivation and address environmental issues caused by the invasive spread of related species. (2019-03-28)
Duckweed: The low-down on a tiny plant
An international research team led by researchers from the University of Münster and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology (both Germany) have found why the giant duckweed has a low genetic diversity despite its large population size: low mutation rates contribute to low genetic diversity. (2019-03-26)
Speciation: Birds of a feather...
Carrion crows and hooded crows are almost indistinguishable genetically, and hybrid offspring are fertile. (2019-03-26)
Understanding gene interactions holds key to personalized medicine, scientists say
Scientists outline a new framework for studying gene function -- not in isolation, gene by gene, but as a network, to understand how multiple genes and genetic background influence trait inheritance. (2019-03-25)
Uncovering uncultivated microbes in the human gut
A human's health is shaped both by environmental factors and the body's interactions with the microbiome, particularly in the gut. (2019-03-14)
On-the-spot genome analysis
By fine-tuning how algorithms carve up DNA data, Garvan researchers have made it possible to do genomic analysis on a smartphone. (2019-03-13)
Unveiling the role of selenocysteine, the mysterious 21st amino acid
Selenocysteine is an essential amino acid for certain species, such as humans and the other vertebrates, although it has disappeared from others, such as insects. (2019-03-11)
Selfish genetic elements amplify inflammation and age-related diseases
Researchers from the University of Rochester show that LINE1 retrotransposons, a class of selfish genetic elements, become more active with age and may cause age-related diseases by triggering inflammation. (2019-03-11)
The largest ever catalog of bacteria in the human body contain over 150 thousands genomes
The largest ever catalog of bacterial and archaeal microbes commonly populating the human body across worldwide populations has been assembled. (2019-03-11)
Genes that evolve from scratch expand protein diversity
A new study published in Nature Ecology and Evolution led by scientists from the University of Chicago challenges one of the classic assumptions about how new proteins evolve. (2019-03-11)
Illuminating the genome
Development of a new molecular visualisation method, RNA-guided endonuclease -- in situ labelling (RGEN-ISL) for the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated labelling of genomic sequences in nuclei and chromosomes. (2019-03-08)
New key players in the methane cycle
Methane is not only a powerful greenhouse gas, but also a source of energy. (2019-03-04)
In search of new 'sugar cleavers'
Complex sugars play multiple and essential roles in the living world. (2019-03-04)
How genetic background shapes individual differences within a species
Study reveals how genetic background influences trait inheritance laying the grounds for predicting personal risk of disease. (2019-02-25)
Rules of inheritance rewritten in worms
Laboratory model breaks laws of heredity, opening up new research possibilities in genetics and synthetic biology. (2019-02-21)
Hop to it: Researchers evaluate rabbits' evolved resistance to myxoma virus
Partnering with the University of Cambridge and several other research institutes, Biodesign researchers, as part of Grant McFadden's Center of for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy, validated the role of specific rabbit genes in contributing to this acquired resistance in research published in Science Magazine. (2019-02-14)
Cross-species cancer comparison uncovers new drug targets, study reveals
Mucosal melanoma arises in non-skin locations such as sinuses, nasal passages and mouth. (2019-02-12)
Bird flu shuffle probes viral compatibility
Emory scientists have been probing the RNA packaging factors that limit reassortment between avian H7N9/H5N8 strains and a well-known strain (H3N2) that has been dominating the last few human flu seasons in the United States. (2019-02-12)
Almost 2,000 unknown bacteria discovered in the human gut
Researchers have used computational methods to identify nearly 2,000 uncultured gut bacterial species. (2019-02-11)
Study of Arctic fishes reveals the birth of a gene -- from 'junk'
Though separated by a world of ocean, and unrelated to each other, two fish groups - one in the Arctic, the other in the Antarctic - share a surprising survival strategy: They both have evolved the ability to produce the same special brand of antifreeze protein in their tissues. (2019-02-11)
Scientists use machine learning to ID source of Salmonella
A team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin has developed a machine-learning approach that could lead to quicker identification of the animal source of certain Salmonella outbreaks. (2019-02-11)
DNA provides insights into penguin evolution and reveals two new extinct penguins
New University of Otago research has improved our understanding of when and why penguins evolved, and has identified two recently extinct penguins from New Zealand's remote Chatham Islands. (2019-02-07)
Research explains how snakes lost their limbs
The study is part of an effort to understand how changes in the genome lead to changes in phenotypes. (2019-02-06)
New disease surveillance tool helps detect any human virus
A new computational method called 'CATCH' designs molecular 'baits' for any virus known to infect humans and all their known strains, including those that are present in low abundance in clinical samples, such as Zika. (2019-02-04)
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