Current Germination News and Events

Current Germination News and Events, Germination News Articles.
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When plants attack: parasitic plants use ethylene as a host invasion signal
Researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology have found that parasitic plants use the plant hormone ethylene as a signal to invade host plants. Parasitic plants make an organ called a haustorium to attach to and invade hosts, and to obtain water and nutrients. Ethylene is used by parasitic plants to tweak haustorium development and host invasion. This knowledge could be used to develop new ways to control a range of parasitic weeds. (2020-11-04)

Short-term moisture removal can eliminate downy mildew of spinach
Scientists at the University of Arkansas explored the relationship between available moisture and disease establishment and in a recent article they demonstrated that removing moisture decreased both spore survival and disease. Even a 30-minute dry period reduced spore germination to almost zero. Spores were unable to recover and cause disease on spinach. (2020-11-02)

Cover crop could solve weed problems for edamame growers
For vegetable growers, weeds can mean lost income from reduced yield and foreign plant matter contaminating the harvest. But for many crops, particularly vegetable legumes, weed management options are very limited. (2020-10-13)

Plasma scientists optimize plant growth and yield
At the American Physical Society's Gaseous Electronics Conference, researchers described techniques for delivering plasma to seeds and plants and identifying which plants are most likely to respond. (2020-10-06)

Glyphosate residue in manure fertilizer decrease strawberry and meadow fescue growth
A new study finds that glyphosate residue from herbicides in manure fertilizer decrease the growth of strawberry and meadow fescue as well as runner production of strawberry. (2020-09-18)

Are cover crops negatively impacting row crops?
Research investigates if chemicals released by cover crops may be the cause for yield reductions (2020-07-30)

Adjusting planter parameters to match field conditions can maximize emergence and yield
Planter performance is a critical component when laying the foundation for a successful crop season. Environmental and soil conditions can significantly impact crop germination and emergence and help or hinder development of an adequate crop stand early in the season. Adjusting specific planter components and settings to match current field conditions can ensure maximized emergence and increase yield in most cases. (2020-07-29)

Highly stable amyloid protein aggregates may help plant seeds last longer
Highly stable polymeric ''amyloid'' proteins, best known for their role in Alzheimer's disease, have been mostly studied in animals. But a new study on the garden pea publishing July 23, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by Anton Nizhnikov of All-Russia Research Institute for Agricultural Microbiology (ARRIAM) and colleagues, shows that they also occur in plants, and they may be an important adaptation for prolonging seed viability. (2020-07-23)

Climate change threat to tropical plants
Half of the world's tropical plant species may struggle to germinate by 2070 because of global warming, a new UNSW study predicts. (2020-07-02)

Uncovering the genetic basis of hermaphroditism in grapes, the trait that allowed domestication
Plant experts at UC Davis have defined the genetic basis of sex determination in grapevines, one of the oldest and most valuable crops worldwide. In new research Dario Cantu and Mélanie Massonnet propose a novel model of sex evolution before and during grapevine domestication nearly 8,000 years ago. Their work could have broad application in breeding grapes and other plant species. (2020-06-18)

Soap bubbles pollinated a pear orchard without damaging delicate flowers
Soap bubbles facilitated the pollination of a pear orchard by delivering pollen grains to targeted flowers, demonstrating that this whimsical technique can successfully pollinate fruit-bearing plants. The study, from the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology in Nomi, Japan, and published June 17 in the journal iScience, suggests that soap bubbles may present a low-tech complement to robotic pollination technology designed to supplement the work of vanishing bees. (2020-06-17)

Development of heat-tolerant annual ryegrass germplasm
Researchers develop new annual ryegrass for earlier fall planting in the southeastern US. (2020-05-21)

The genome of jojoba: The only plant to store wax in its seeds
Interest on Jojoba crop was, and still is, jojoba oil, which is not a glyceride fat, but a liquid wax with unique chemical configuration and features. 'Therefore, it raises the need to generate an overview on the oil deposit in relation to structural arrangement of seed,' says Dr. Ljudmilla Borisjuk, head of the research group Assimilate Allocation and NMR (AAN) at IPK. (2020-05-20)

University of Guelph develops effective way to replenish threatened plants
Planting Hill's thistle seeds has low flowering and germination rates. The study used the CPR (Conservation, Propagation, Redistribution) method to preserve the genetic material of germ cells of two plants and then use that material to produce 1,000 plants in the lab. They transplanted 300 at 12 sites in Ontario. Survival rate ranged from 67 to 99 per cent, with nearly all plants surviving the winter and showing shoot regeneration and flowering. (2020-04-22)

Drug used for liver disease also affects C. diff life cycle, reduces inflammation in mice
Researchers have found that a commonly used drug made from secondary bile acids can affect the life cycle of Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) in vitro and reduce the inflammatory response to C. diff in mice. (2020-03-30)

NTU scientists transform ultra-tough pollen into flexible material
Scientists at NTU Singapore have found a way to turn pollen, one of the hardest materials in the plant kingdom, into a soft and flexible material, with the potential to serve as 'building blocks' for the design of new categories of eco-friendly materials. They used a simple chemical process akin to conventional soap-making to turn pollen grains from sunflowers into soft microgel particles that respond to various stimuli. (2020-03-19)

Local genetic adaption helps sorghum crop hide from witchweed
Sorgum crops in areas where the parasite witchweed is common have locally adapted to have mutations in a particular gene, which helps the plant resist the parasite. A new study led by researchers at Penn State reveals the effects of this mutation, as well as other genes that might confer parasite resistance. (2020-02-11)

Solving the riddle of strigolactone biosynthesis in plants
Researchers from Kobe University's Graduate School of Agricultural Science have discovered the orobanchol synthase responsible for converting the strigolactone (SL) carlactonoic acid, which promotes symbiotic relationships with fungi, into the SL orobanchol, which causes root parasitic weeds to germinate. By knocking out the orobanchol synthase gene using genome editing, they succeeded in artificially regulating SL production. This discovery will lead to greater understanding of the functions of each SL and enable the practical application of SLs in the improvement of plant production. (2020-01-30)

Sanitary care by social ants shapes disease outcome
Sanitary care in ants to fight disease is known to improve the wellbeing of the colony, yet it has been unclear how social disease defense interferes with pathogen competition inside the individual host body. In their recent study published in Ecology Letters, Sylvia Cremer and her research group at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) revealed that collective care-giving has the power to bias the outcome of coinfections in fungus-exposed colony members. (2020-01-17)

UC Davis scientists provide novel strategies for parasitic weed control
Parasitic weeds are among the world's most economically damaging agricultural pests. They use an organ called the haustorium to build connections with host plants and draw nutrients from them. While the majority of research on parasitic plant biology and control of root parasitic weeds has been heavily focused on seed germination, scientists at UC Davis focused on the development of haustorium and published their findings in Phytopathology. (2020-01-14)

New insights into the earliest events of seed germination
Plant seeds can store their energy in a dry state for years, only to suddenly release it and germinate. How is energy in the seed made available? How can energy metabolism be started early and efficiently? An international team of researchers led by the University of Münster (Germany) has discovered that thiol redox switches play a key role in kick-starting the energy metabolism. The study has been published in ''PNAS''. (2019-12-27)

Plants might be helping each other more than thought
Contrary to the long-held belief that plants in the natural world are always in competition, new research has found that in harsh environments mature plants help smaller ones -- and thrive as a result. (2019-11-13)

New evidence that bacteria drive biodiversity in the Cape Floral Region
South African botanists have found evidence that the largest Cape geophyte genus, Oxalis, has developed a unique association with the bacterial genus Bacillus, that help it to fix nitrogen from the air and to perform extraordinary feats of germination. Furthermore, they proved that the Bacillus bacteria are so integrated into this symbiotic relationship that they are even inherited from mother plant to seed. This is the first report of such a system of vertical inheritance of endophyte bacteria for geophytes. (2019-10-30)

Soil on moon and Mars likely to support crops
Researchers at Wageningen University & Research in the Netherlands have produced crops in Mars and moon soil simulant developed by NASA. The research supports the idea that it would not only be possible to grow food on Mars and the moon to feed future settlers, but also to obtain viable seed from crops grown there. (2019-10-14)

Little helpers for the rainforest
Primate researchers show how monkeys contribute to the regeneration of tropical forests. (2019-07-25)

Cigarette butts hamper plant growth -- study
Researchers have shown for the first time that cigarette butts reduce plant growth. Cigarette butts are the most common form of litter worldwide, with an estimated 4.5 trillion discarded annually. (2019-07-19)

Using an embryonic pause to save the date
A date palm seedling can pause its development to boost its resilience before emerging into the harsh desert environment. (2019-07-08)

A Trojan horse? Immune cells ferry deadly fungus from mouse lung into the blood
A report today (June 27) in PLOS Pathogens shows how inhaled fungal spores exit the lung and trigger a fatal infection in mice. (2019-06-27)

Biochar may boost carbon storage, but benefits to germination and growth appear scant
Biochar may not be the miracle soil additive that many farmers and researchers hoped it to be, according to a new University of Illinois study. Biochar may boost the agricultural yield of some soils -- especially poor quality ones -- but there is no consensus on its effectiveness. Researchers tested different soils' responses to multiple biochar types and were unable to verify their ability to increase plant growth. However, the study did show biochar's ability to affect soil greenhouse gas emissions. (2019-06-19)

Controlling temperatures for inexpensive plant experiments
Inexpensive, easy-to-use temperature controllers are able to provide reliable set temperatures for the detailed observation of developmental rates in response to different temperature treatments. (2019-06-14)

The University of Cordoba guides plants towards obtaining iron
A team at the University of Cordoba relates the presence of beneficial organisms in plant roots to their response to iron deficiency. (2019-05-29)

Hunting jeopardizes forest carbon storage, yet is overlooked in climate mitigation efforts
The loss of animals, often due to unregulated or illegal hunting, has consequences for the carbon storage capacity of forests, yet this link is rarely mentioned in high-level climate policy discussions, according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden and the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. (2019-05-06)

Banana disease boosted by climate change
Climate change has raised the risk of a fungal disease that ravages banana crops, new research shows. (2019-05-05)

The holm oak transcriptome is rebuilt, a key step towards understanding its biology
This research is a starting point in order to comprehend how this tree behaves during situations of stress at a molecular level. (2019-04-04)

Seeds inherit memories from their mother
Seeds remain in a dormant state as long as environmental conditions are not ideal for germination. The depth of this sleep is inherited from their mother. UNIGE'Researchers reveal how this maternal imprint is transmitted through fragments of 'interfering' RNAs, which inactivate genes, and that a similar mechanism enables to transmit another imprint, that of the temperatures present during the development of the seed. This mechanism allows the seed to optimize the timing of its germination. (2019-03-26)

Not all carrot germplasm is the same -- in terms of salinity tolerance
A study out of The USDA Agricultural Research Service at the University of Wisconsin has evaluated the response of diverse carrot germplasm to salinity stress, identified salt-tolerant carrot germplasm that may be used by breeders, and defined appropriate screening criteria for assessing salt tolerance in germinating carrot seed. (2019-03-26)

Sphinx molecule to rescue African farmers from witchweed
An interdisciplinary team led by researchers at Nagoya University has discovered a highly potent and selective molecule, SPL7, that can lead seeds of the noxious parasitic weed Striga to suicide germination. (2018-12-17)

Soil tilling, mulching key to China's potato crop
In the Loess Plateau region of northwestern China, potato is the main food crop. However, the area has a dry climate with uneven precipitation. Researchers are finding the best combination of tillage and mulching practices to increase yield. (2018-11-28)

Bacterial therapy tolerable, shows early promise in patients with advanced solid tumors
A phase I clinical trial investigating the use of bacterial Clostridium novyi-NT spores as an injectable monotherapy had manageable toxicities and showed early clinical efficacy in patients with treatment-refractory solid tumor malignancies, according to data presented at the Fourth CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference: Translating Science into Survival, held Sept. 30-Oct. 3. (2018-09-30)

Seeing the light: Scientists unlock seed germination process
Scientists have identified a key gene that helps seeds decide whether to germinate. The MFT gene stops seeds germinating in the dark or under shady conditions, where their chances of survival would be poor, according to new research from the University of York. (2018-08-07)

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