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Current Global ecology News and Events

Current Global ecology News and Events, Global ecology News Articles.
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Earth Commission to identify risks, guardrails, targets for entire planet
A new Earth Commission, comprised of 19 of the world's foremost scientists, chaired by Johan Rockström, Joyeeta Gupta, and Dahe Qin, will define guardrails -- akin to >2C for climate -- for land, water, oceans and biodiversity leading to a coherent suite of practical, science-based targets. (2019-09-19)
The life aquatic made clear with freshwater lens
A Swansea University doctoral student has found a way to view the life of plants and animals in murky waters - by using a lens of freshwater. (2019-09-18)
Fungicides as an underestimated hazard for freshwater organisms
Large amounts of fungicides, used in agriculture, leak into nearby surface waters. (2019-09-17)
Study: We need more realistic experiments on the impact of climate change on ecosystems
When it comes to the impact of climate change on ecosystems, we still have large knowledge gaps. (2019-09-16)
Large transnational corporations play critical role in global natural resource management
Researchers have identified six corporate actions that, combined with effective public policy and improved governmental regulations, could help large transnational corporations steer environmental stewardship efforts around the world. (2019-09-16)
'Planting water' is possible -- against aridity and droughts
Together with scientists from the UK and the US, researchers from the Leibniz- Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have developed a mathematical model that can reflect the complex interplays between vegetation, soil and water regimes. (2019-09-11)
Conserving rare species for the maintenance of Mediterranean forests
This study has shown the importance of conserving rare species for the maintenance of complex ecosystems like Mediterranean forests. (2019-09-11)
Scientists solve lingering mystery of poorly understood frog
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at McMaster University, has solved a centuries-old mystery of 'Fraser's Clawed Frog', an unusual and elusive species found in West Africa. (2019-09-11)
Female gorillas detect and avoid sick groups
Gorillas are social animals, living in groups that females will migrate to join, becoming members of harems. (2019-09-11)
New UN high-seas treaty must close gaps in biodiversity governance
Thousands of marine species could be at risk if a new United Nations high-seas biodiversity treaty, now being negotiated in New York, does not include measures to address the management of all fish species in waters beyond national jurisdiction, not just commercial species, warns an analysis by a Duke University-led team of American, Dutch, Swiss and French researchers. (2019-08-29)
A global assessment of Earth's early anthropogenic transformation
A global archaeological assessment of ancient land use reveals that prehistoric human activity had already substantially transformed the ecology of Earth by 3,000 years ago, even before intensive farming and the domestication of plants and animals. (2019-08-29)
Archaeological assessment reveals Earth's early transformation through land use
The first global assessment of archaeological land use changes from 10,000 BP to 1850 CE reveals that our planet was dramatically transformed from its earlier state by hunter-gatherers, farmers and pastoralists by 3,000-4,000 years ago. (2019-08-29)
Would a carbon tax help to innovate more-efficient energy use?
Taxing carbon emissions would drive innovation and lead to improved energy efficiency, according to a new paper published in Joule from Carnegie's Rong Wang (now at Fudan University), Harry Saunders, and Ken Caldeira, along with Juan Moreno-Cruz of the University of Waterloo. (2019-08-27)
BES launches large-scale study to test whether 'blinding' reduces bias in science publishing
A two-year randomised controlled trial in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology will be the largest of its kind to date to assess whether hiding author details during peer review reduces bias against underrepresented groups in the science publishing process. (2019-08-21)
Poo transplants to help save koalas
Poo transplants are helping expand koala microbiomes, allowing the marsupials to eat a wider range of eucalypts and possibly survive habitat loss. (2019-08-20)
To make lakes healthy, you first need the right recipe
Pollution of lakes is a worldwide problem. Restoration attempts take a lot of time and effort, and even then they might backfire. (2019-08-20)
Global change is triggering an identity switch in grasslands
Since the first Homo sapiens emerged in Africa roughly 300,000 years ago, grasslands have sustained humanity and thousands of other species. (2019-08-19)
New information on tropical parasitoid insects revealed
The diversity and ecology of African parasitoid wasps was studied for over a year during a project run by the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland. (2019-08-14)
Improved sewage treatment has increased biodiversity over past 30 years
A higher standard of wastewater treatment in the UK has been linked to substantial improvements in a river's biodiversity over the past 30 years. (2019-08-14)
New study: Fracking prompts global spike in atmospheric methane
As methane concentrations increase in the Earth's atmosphere, chemical fingerprints point to a probable source: shale oil and gas, according to new Cornell University research published today in Biogeosciences, a journal of the European Geosciences Union. (2019-08-14)
Study examines a million corals one by one in urgent call to save reefs
University of California, Irvine biologist Joleah Lamb has contributed one of the largest amounts of data to a landmark study on how to save coral reefs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. (2019-08-12)
Structurally complex forests better at carbon sequestration
Forests in the eastern United States that are structurally complex -- meaning the arrangement of vegetation is highly varied -- sequester more carbon, according to a new study led by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University. (2019-08-12)
88% decline of big freshwater animals
Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have now quantified the global decline of big freshwater animals: from 1970 to 2012, global populations of freshwater megafauna declined by 88% -- twice the loss of vertebrate populations on land or in the ocean. (2019-08-08)
Study raises concerns about prevalent orchid viruses
In a Plants, People, Planet study, researchers investigated the evolution of the two most prevalent orchid viruses using information representing their global distribution. (2019-08-07)
Calcium levels in freshwater lakes declining in Europe and North America
A new global study of how calcium concentrations are changing in freshwater lakes around the world has revealed that in widespread areas in Europe and eastern North America, calcium levels are declining towards levels that can be critically low for the reproduction and survival of many aquatic organisms. (2019-08-06)
How do you forecast eruptions at volcanoes that sit 'on the cusp' for decades?
Some volcanoes take their time--experiencing protracted, years-long periods of unrest before eventually erupting. (2019-08-06)
New study could reset how scientists view sex determination in painted turtle populations
A study that looks at how temperature influences the development of painted turtles may lead biologists to rethink the theoretical frameworks they use when analyzing the topic. (2019-08-06)
Road verges provide refuge for pollinators
Roadside verges provide a vital refuge for pollinators -- but they must be managed better, new research shows. (2019-08-05)
Geoengineering versus a volcano
Major volcanic eruptions spew ash particles into the atmosphere, which reflect some of the Sun's radiation back into space and cool the planet. (2019-08-05)
Symphony of genes
One of the most exciting discoveries in genome research was that the last common ancestor of all multicellular animals already possessed an extremely complex genome. (2019-08-05)
The front line of environmental violence
Environmental defenders on the front line of natural resource conflict are being killed at an alarming rate, according to a University of Queensland study. (2019-08-05)
Fearing cougars more than wolves, Yellowstone elk manage threats from both predators
Wolves are charismatic, conspicuous, and easy to single out as the top predator affecting populations of elk, deer, and other prey animals. (2019-08-02)
Caterpillars of the peppered moth perceive color through their skin
It is difficult to distinguish caterpillars of the peppered moth from a twig. (2019-08-02)
Smaller class size means more success for women in STEM
A new study demonstrates that increasing class size has the largest negative impact on female participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) classrooms, and offers insights on ways to change the trend. (2019-07-24)
Privatization of public goods can cause population decline, research shows
Scientists have given a fascinating new insight into the way microbes adopt a 'co-operative' approach to securing the nutrients they need to thrive. (2019-07-23)
More sensitive climates are more variable climates, research shows
A decade without any global warming is more likely to happen if the climate is more sensitive to carbon dioxide emissions, new research has revealed. (2019-07-22)
Researchers publish new study on citrus greening disease
A new study published by researchers at Virginia Tech with a team of international researchers in Journal of Applied Ecology investigates the thermal suitability for transmission of citrus greening with implications for surveillance and prevention. (2019-07-15)
Best male biathletes 'more attractive'
Top male biathletes are more attractive to the opposite sex, according to a new study by scientists at the universities of Exeter and Bristol. (2019-07-10)
The path to China's 'ecological civilization' starts with national parks
President Xi Jinping staked out China's role as a committed player to tackle the climate crisis and build an 'ecological civilization.' In a review published July 10 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, researchers discuss one of the Chinese government's efforts -- reforming the management of protected areas by streamlining agencies' responsibilities and reducing functional overlaps. (2019-07-10)
Grazing animals drove domestication of grain crops
During the Pleistocene, massive herds directed the ecology across much of the globe and caused evolutionary changes in plants. (2019-07-08)
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