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Current Global warming News and Events

Current Global warming News and Events, Global warming News Articles.
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For some urban areas, a warming climate is only half the threat
A new study from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies projects that the growth of urban areas in the coming decades will trigger ''extra'' warming due to a phenomenon known as the urban heat island effect (UHI). (2019-11-14)
Climate change expected to shift location of East Asian Monsoons
More than a billion people in Asia depend on seasonal monsoons for their water needs. (2019-11-13)
Climate impact of hydropower varies widely
Hydropower is broadly considered to be much more environmentally friendly than electricity generated from fossil fuels, and in many cases this is true. (2019-11-13)
Tuna carbon ratios reveal shift in food web
The ratio of carbon isotopes in three common species of tuna has changed substantially since 2000, suggesting major shifts are also taking place in the phytoplankton populations that form the basis of the ocean's food web, according to a new international study involving Duke University researchers. (2019-11-13)
Bacteria may contribute more to climate change as planet heats up
As bacteria adapt to hotter temperatures, they speed up their respiration rate and release more carbon, potentially accelerating climate change. (2019-11-12)
This is what the monsoon might look like in a warmer world
In the last interglacial period on Earth about 125,000 years ago, the Indian monsoon was longer, more extreme and less reliable than it is today. (2019-11-12)
What future do emperor penguins face?
Emperor penguins establish their colonies on sea ice under extremely specific conditions. (2019-11-12)
Individual climate models may not provide the complete picture
Equilibrium climate sensitivity -- how sensitive the Earth's climate is to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide -- may be underestimated in individual climate models, according to a team of climate scientists. (2019-11-12)
Government should address climate change, health and taxes as one issue
Protecting our climate will protect health, and implementing evidence-based policies that consider action to meet targets on global warming, the economy, taxes and health together should be a priority for Canada's government, argues an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-11-11)
Hurricanes have become bigger and more destructive for USA; new study from the Niels Bohr Institute
A new study by researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Aslak Grinsted, Peter Ditlevsen and Jens Hesselbjerg shows that hurricanes have become more destructive since 1900, and the worst of them are more than 3 times as frequent now than 100 years ago. (2019-11-11)
Unless warming is slowed, emperor penguins will be marching towards extinction
Emperor penguins are some of the most striking and charismatic animals on Earth, but a new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has found that a warming climate may render them extinct by the end of this century. (2019-11-07)
Carbon dioxide capture and use could become big business
Capturing carbon dioxide and turning it into commercial products, such as fuels or construction materials, could become a new global industry, according to a study by researchers from UCLA, the University of Oxford and five other institutions. (2019-11-06)
Scientists declare climate emergency, establish global indicators for effective action
A global coalition of scientists says 'untold human suffering' is unavoidable without deep and lasting shifts in human activities that contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and other factors related to climate change. (2019-11-05)
Scientists create 'artificial leaf' that turns carbon into fuel
Scientists have created an 'artificial leaf' to fight climate change by inexpensively converting harmful carbon dioxide (CO2) into a useful alternative fuel. (2019-11-04)
Sea levels to continue rising after Paris agreement emission pledges expire in 2030
Sea levels will continue to rise around the world long after current carbon emissions pledges made through the Paris climate agreement are met and global temperatures stabilize, a new study indicates. (2019-11-04)
Intensified global monsoon extreme rainfall signals global warming -- A study
A new study reveals significant associations between global warming and the observed intensification of extreme rainfall over the global monsoon region and its several subregions, including the southern part of South Africa, India, North America and the eastern part of the South America. (2019-10-30)
Climate change could drive British crop farming north and west
Unchecked climate change could drive Britain's crop growing north and west, leaving the east and south east unable to support crop growing, new research suggests. (2019-10-29)
Exposing blind spots in the carbon budget space
The impact of 1°C of global heating is already having devastating impacts on communities and ecosystems across the globe. (2019-10-29)
Largest mapping of breathing ocean floor key to understanding global carbon cycle
The largest open-access database of the sediment community oxygen consumption and CO2 respiration is now available. (2019-10-29)
Global warming's impact on undernourishment
Global warming may increase undernutrition through the effects of heat exposure on people, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Yuming Guo of Monash University, Australia, and colleagues. (2019-10-29)
Scientists warn of new health threat caused by global warming
We know global warming will affect food production, but Australian researchers believe it is also likely to increase illnesses caused by undernutrition, due to the effects of heat exposure. (2019-10-29)
Why are big storms bringing so much more rain? Warming, yes, but also winds
For three hurricane seasons in a row, storms with record-breaking rainfall have caused catastrophic flooding in the southern United States. (2019-10-29)
Mutated ferns shed light on ancient mass extinction
At the end of the Triassic around 201 million years ago, three out of four species on Earth disappeared. (2019-10-28)
Theory explains biological reasons that force fish to move poleward
The Gill-Oxygen Limitation Theory explains the biological reasons that force fish, particularly larger or older ones, to move poleward when the waters in their habitats heat-up due to climate change. (2019-10-28)
An evapotranspiration deficit drought index to detect drought impacts on ecosystems
The difference between actual and potential evapotranspiration, technically termed a standardized evapotranspiration deficit drought index (SEDI), can more sensitively capture the biological changes of ecosystems in response to the dynamics of drought intensity, compared with indices based on precipitation and temperature. (2019-10-24)
Climate science: 300-year thinning may have predisposed Antarctic ice shelves to collapse
Ice shelves in the eastern Antarctic Peninsula may have been predisposed to collapse by hundreds years of thinning according to a study in Scientific Reports. (2019-10-24)
US corn yields get boost from a global warming 'hole'
The global average temperature has increased 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit over the last 100 years. (2019-10-24)
Warming waters, local differences in oceanography affect Gulf of Maine lobster population
Two new studies point to the role of a warming ocean and local differences in oceanography in the rise and fall of lobster populations southern New England to Atlantic Canada. (2019-10-24)
Fish pass 'hot genes' onto their grandchildren
Fish that are able to survive and adjust to warming waters may pass heat-tolerant genes not just onto their children, but their grandchildren too. (2019-10-22)
Assessing the benefits and risks of land-based greenhouse gas removal
IIASA researchers collaborated with colleagues at a number of international institutions to assess the benefits and risks associated with six different land-based greenhouse gas removal options in light of their potential impacts on ecosystems services and the UN Sustainable Development Goals. (2019-10-21)
A climate model developed by ISGlobal provides long-term predictions of 'El Niño' events
For the first time, a tool can predict episodes up to two-and-a-half years in advance. (2019-10-21)
No place like home: Species are on the move, but many have nowhere to go
Since the 1970s, insects in the warmer half of Britain have been flying, hopping and crawling northwards at an average rate of around five metres per day. (2019-10-21)
Plant physiology will be major contributor to future river flooding, UCI study finds
In a study published today in Nature Climate Change, Universithy fo California, Irvine researchers describe the emerging role of ecophysiology in riparian flooding. (2019-10-21)
Large-scale afforestation of African savannas will destroy valuable ecosystems
In a technical comment, published in Science, a group of 46 scientists from around the world argue that the suggested afforestation of large areas of Africa to mitigate climate change will destroy valuable ecological, agricultural, and tourist areas, while doing little to reduce global CO2 levels. (2019-10-21)
Climate warming promises more frequent extreme El Niño events
New research, based on 33 historical El Niño events from 1901 to 2017, show climate change effects have shifted the El Niño onset location from the eastern Pacific to the western Pacific and caused more frequent extreme El Niño events since the 1970's. (2019-10-21)
Breaking water molecules apart to generate clean fuel: Investigating a promising material
Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) investigated a material that uses sunlight for splitting water molecules (H2O) to obtain dihydrogen (H2). (2019-10-17)
Future flash drought will increase over humid regions
proposed a new definition of flash drought based on rapid decline rate of soil moisture and the dry persistency. (2019-10-17)
The composition of species is changing in ecosystems across the globe
While the identities of species in local assemblages are undergoing significant changes, their average number is relatively constant. (2019-10-17)
Global biodiversity crisis is a large-scale reorganization, with greatest loss in tropical oceans
Local biodiversity of species -- the scale on which humans feel contributions from biodiversity -- is being rapidly reorganized, according to a new global analysis of biodiversity data from more than 200 studies, together representing all major biomes. (2019-10-17)
Reforesting is a good idea, but it is necessary to know where and how
An international group of ecologists contests an article published in ''Science,'' which among other cardinal errors proposed ''reforestation'' of the Cerrado, Brazil's savanna biome. (2019-10-17)
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