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Current Great apes News and Events

Current Great apes News and Events, Great apes News Articles.
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How human brain development diverged from great apes
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Ophthalmology Basel, and ETH Zurich, Switzerland, present new insights into the development of the human brain and differences in this process compared to other great apes. (2019-10-16)
A secret in saliva: Food and germs helped humans evolve into unique member of great apes
University at Buffalo researchers discovered that the human diet -- a result of increased meat consumption, cooking and agriculture -- has led to stark differences in the saliva of humans compared to that of other primates. (2019-10-16)
The brain does not follow the head
The human brain is about three times the size of the brains of great apes. (2019-10-15)
Resurrection of 50,000-year-old gene reveals how malaria jumped from gorillas to humans
For the first time, scientists have uncovered the likely series of events that led to the world's deadliest malaria parasite being able to jump from gorillas to humans. (2019-10-15)
New research furthers understanding about what shapes human gut microbiome
A new Northwestern University study finds that despite human's close genetic relationship to apes, the human gut microbiome is more similar to that of Old World monkeys like baboons than to that of apes like chimpanzees. (2019-10-07)
L-chondrite breakup might have contributed to Ordovician biodiversification
About 466 Mya, a major impact event took place between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. (2019-10-03)
Living a long chimpanzee life
Researchers from Kyoto University report on the average life expectancy of chimpanzees in Japan. (2019-10-03)
Great apes have you on their mind
For decades a fierce debate was raised on whether any nonhuman species possess the ability of 'Theory of Mind'. (2019-09-30)
Rare 10 million-year-old fossil unearths new view of human evolution
Near an old mining town in Central Europe, known for its picturesque turquoise-blue quarry water, lay Rudapithecus. (2019-09-17)
Taking evolution to heart
An international research group at UBC, Harvard University and Cardiff Metropolitan University has discovered how the human heart has adapted to support endurance physical activities. (2019-09-16)
What the noggin of modern humans' ancestor would have looked like
Despite having lived about 300,000 years ago, the oldest ancestor of all members of our species had a surprisingly modern skull -- as suggested by a model created by CNRS researcher Aurélien Mounier and Cambridge University professor Marta Mirazón Lahr. (2019-09-10)
NUS study reveals similarities in human, chimpanzee, and bonobo eye colour patterns
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have revealed that chimpanzees and bonobos share the contrasting colour pattern seen in human eyes, which makes it easy for them to detect the direction of someone's gaze from a distance. (2019-09-04)
First human ancestors breastfed for longer than contemporary relatives
By analyzing the fossilized teeth of some of our most ancient ancestors, a team of scientists led by the universities of Bristol (UK) and Lyon (France) have discovered that the first humans significantly breastfed their infants for longer periods than their contemporary relatives. (2019-08-29)
Hubble's new portrait of Jupiter
This new Hubble Space Telescope view of Jupiter, taken on June 27, 2019, reveals the giant planet's trademark Great Red Spot, and a more intense color palette in the clouds swirling in Jupiter's turbulent atmosphere than seen in previous years. (2019-08-08)
Unexpected nut eating by gorillas
Scientists from the Max Planck institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and Washington University in St. (2019-08-02)
Gibbons' large, long-term territories put them under threat from habitat loss
Wild gibbons living in the peat swamps of southern Borneo require between 20 and 50 hectares of forest territory for each group, making their populations particularly vulnerable to habitat loss, according to a study publishing July 31 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dr. (2019-07-31)
Conservation or construction? Deciding waterbird hotspots
MSU scientists show that conservation and construction decisions should rely on multiple approaches to determine waterbird 'hotspots,' not just on one analysis method as is often done. (2019-07-30)
Chimpanzees' working memory similar to ours
Working memory is central to our mental lives; we use it to add up the cost of our shopping or to remember the beginning of this sentence at its end. (2019-07-23)
Flies may also spread disease among monkeys and apes
People the world over have a good sense that we do not want flies landing on our food. (2019-07-16)
Environment, not evolution, might underlie some human-ape differences
Apes' abilities have been unfairly measured, throwing into doubt the assumed belief that human infants are superior to adult chimpanzees, according to a new study by leaders in the field of ape cognition. (2019-07-15)
Early human species' teeth provide insight into evolution of breastfeeding
Mount Sinai researchers working as part of an international team have discovered previously unknown breastfeeding patterns of an extinct early human species by studying their 2-million-year-old teeth, providing insights into the evolution of human breastfeeding practices, according to a study published in Nature in July. (2019-07-15)
Extinct human species likely breast fed for a year after birth, NIH-funded study suggests
Infants of the extinct human species Australopithecus africanus likely breast fed for up to a year after birth, similar to modern humans but of shorter duration than modern day great apes, according to an analysis of fossil teeth funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. (2019-07-15)
Global survey shows crAssphage gut virus in the world's sewage
A global survey shows that a family of gut bacteria viruses called crAssphage is found in people -- and their sewage -- all over the world. (2019-07-08)
Understanding what makes captive gorilla hearts tick
We've known for some time that heart disease is prevalent in captive gorilla populations and is a leading cause of death. (2019-06-26)
Parental care has forced great crested grebes to lay eggs with an eye on seagulls
Ornithologists from St Petersburg University, Elmira Zaynagutdinova and Yuriy Mikhailov, studied the features of the great crested grebes (Podiceps cristatus) nesting in the nature reserve 'North Coast of the Neva Bay'. (2019-06-21)
Chimpanzees catch and eat crabs
Chimpanzees have a mainly vegetarian diet, but do occasionally eat meat. (2019-05-29)
Research reveals the link between primate knuckles and hand use
Research carried out by the University of Kent has found differences between the knuckle joints of primates that will enable a better understanding of ancient human hand use. (2019-05-29)
Declining fertility rates may explain Neanderthal extinction, suggests new model
A new hypothesis for Neanderthal extinction supported by population modelling is put forward in a new study by Anna Degioanni from Aix Marseille Université, France and colleagues, published May 29, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. (2019-05-29)
Brain size and fertility in mammals may depend on who cares for offspring
The evolution of larger brain size in offspring is associated with the amount of paternal care in mammals, whereas higher fertility in the mothers is correlated with additional care support from individuals that are not the offspring's biological parents (alloparents), according to a study published in the journal Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology. (2019-05-29)
Bacteria in fermented food signal the human immune system, explaining health benefits
Researchers have discovered that humans and great apes possess a receptor on their cells that detects metabolites from bacteria commonly found in fermented foods and triggers movement of immune cells. (2019-05-23)
Tooth fossils fill 6-million-year-old gap in primate evolution
UNLV geoscientist, student among international research team behind discovery of ancient monkey species that lived in Africa 22 million years ago. (2019-05-14)
Researchers find evolutionary backing in analysis of mammalian vertebrae
Differences in numbers of vertebrae are most extreme in mammals which do not rely on running and leaping, such as those adapted to suspensory locomotion like apes and sloths, a team of anthropologists has concluded. (2019-05-13)
Human ancestors were 'grounded,' new analysis shows
African apes adapted to living on the ground, a finding that indicates human evolved from an ancestor not limited to tree or other elevated habitats. (2019-04-30)
A surprise: Bonobos eat and share meat at rates similar to chimpanzees
Small forest antelope in the Democratic Republic of the Congo have more to worry about than being eaten by leopards. (2019-04-29)
Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore
Paleontologists at Ohio University have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. (2019-04-18)
Scientists improve sensitivity and stretchability of room-temperature liquid metal-based sensor
Scientists have developed a room-temperature liquid metal-based super-stretchable sensor, with the advantages of facile fabrication, low cost, great stretchability, high repeatability and a GF (gauge factor) as great as 4.95. (2019-04-17)
The history of humanity in your face
The skull and teeth provide a rich library of changes that we can track over time, describing the history of evolution of our species. (2019-04-15)
Astro-ecology: Counting orangutans using star-spotting technology
A groundbreaking scientific collaboration is harnessing technology used to study the luminosity of stars, to carry out detailed monitoring of orangutan populations in Borneo. (2019-04-09)
Hello, kitty: Cats recognize their own names, according to new Japanese research
Pet cats can recognize their own names if their names are used regularly by their owners, according to new results by a team of researchers in Japan. (2019-04-07)
Sweeping census provides new population estimate for western chimpanzees
A sweeping new census published in the journal Environmental Research Letters estimates 52,800 western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) live in eight countries in western Africa, with most of them found outside of protected areas, some of which are threatened by intense development pressures. (2019-03-29)
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