Current Groundwater News and Events

Current Groundwater News and Events, Groundwater News Articles.
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Microbial remedies target chemical threats in the environment
In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology explores new ways to rid the environment of co-occurring toxic chemicals, TCE and perchlorate. To accomplish this, Fe0 in combination with microbial cultures containing an unusual microbe known as Dehalococcoides mccartyi were added to soil and groundwater samples from a contaminated Superfund site in Goodyear, Arizona. The contaminated site had formerly been involved in defense and aerospace manufacturing. (2020-11-17)

New tool predicts geological movement and the flow of groundwater in old coalfields
A remote monitoring tool to help authorities manage public safety and environmental issues in recently abandoned coal mines has been developed by the University of Nottingham. The tool uses satellite radar imagery to capture millimetre-scale measurements of changes in terrain height. Such measurements can be used to monitor and forecast groundwater levels and changes in geological conditions deep below the earth's surface in former mining areas. (2020-11-16)

PFAS: these "forever chemicals" are highly toxic, under-studied, and largely unregulated
Per-/poly-fluroalkyl substances, or PFAS, are everywhere. They are used in firefighting foam, car wax, and even fast-food wrappers. They're one of the most toxic substances ever identified--harmful at concentrations in the parts per trillion--yet very little is known about them. (2020-10-29)

Waste not, want not: recycled water proves fruitful for greenhouse tomatoes
In the driest state in the driest continent in the world, South Australian farmers are acutely aware of the impact of water shortages and drought. So, when it comes to irrigation, knowing which method works best is vital for sustainable crop development. (2020-10-29)

Microplastics in groundwater (and our drinking water) present unknown risk
Microplastics (plastics <5mm) and their negative health impacts have been studied in oceans, rivers, and even soils, and scientists are beginning to grapple with the myriad human health impacts their presence might have. One understudied, but critical, link in the cycle is groundwater, which is often a source of drinking water. (2020-10-26)

SwRI researchers evaluate impact of wastewater systems on Edwards Aquifer
Southwest Research Institute developed an integrated hydrologic computer model to evaluate the impact of different types of wastewater disposal facilities on the Edwards Aquifer, the primary water source for San Antonio and its surrounding communities. The research results will guide authorities on what actions to take to protect the quality and quantity of water entering the aquifer. (2020-10-20)

Hurricanes, heavy rains are critical for Hawai'i's groundwater supply
New research led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa scientists indicates that rain brought to the islands by hurricanes and Kona storms can often be the most important precipitation for re-supplying groundwater in many regions of the island of O'ahu. (2020-10-12)

Groundwater depletion in US High Plains leads to bleak outlook for grain production
The depletion of groundwater sources in parts of the United States High Plains is so severe that peak grain production in some states has already been passed, according to new research. (2020-10-05)

Researchers use satellite imaging to map groundwater use in California's central valley
Researchers at the University of California San Diego report in a new study a way to improve groundwater monitoring by using a remote sensing technology (known as InSAR), in conjunction with climate and land cover data, to bridge gaps in the understanding of sustainable groundwater in California's San Joaquin Valley. (2020-09-30)

Underground connection
Researchers present first global analysis of how effective and topographic catchment areas differ. (2020-09-22)

Artificial intelligence learns continental hydrology
The data sets on the Earth's gravitational field which are required for this, stem from the GRACE and GRACE-FO satellite missions. Using the South American continent as an example, the Earth system modellers at the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ, have developed a new Deep-Learning-Method, which quantifies small as well as large-scale changes to the water storage with the help of satellite data. (2020-08-27)

Majority of groundwater stores resilient to climate change
Fewer of the world's large aquifers are depleting than previously estimated, according to a new study by the University of Sussex and UCL. (2020-08-25)

Sea-level rise linked to higher water tables along California coast
Researchers modeled the effects of rising sea levels along the California coast. While results varied with local topography, the study indicates an increased threat to populated areas already at risk from rising water tables, and the possibility of flooding in unexpected inland areas. (2020-08-21)

Farmers help grow water plan
Overallocation of surface water for growing food crops is shifting agriculture and other industry to use groundwater - which is much more difficult to measure and monitor. Using local producer knowledge as 'soft data' to estimate groundwater use in modelling is a helpful tool in mapping sustainable use of scarce resources, Flinders University experts say. (2020-08-17)

Ultra-small, parasitic bacteria found in groundwater, moose -- and you
In research first published as a pre-print in 2018, and now formally in the journal Cell Reports, scientists describe their findings that Saccharibacteria within a mammalian host are more diverse than ever anticipated. The researchers also discovered that certain members of the bacteria are found in the oral cavity of humans, the guts of other mammals, and in groundwater. (2020-07-21)

Where is the water during a drought?
In low precipitation periods - where and how is the limited available water distributed and what possibilities are there for improving retention in the soil and the landscape? Doerthe Tetzlaff and her team from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries discovered that vegetation has a major influence on this. Using the example of the drought-sensitive Demnitzer Muehlenfliess in Brandenburg, they quantified visible and invisible water flows during and shortly after the drought of 2018. (2020-07-17)

Uplifting of Columbia River basalts opens window on how region was sculpted
Information drawn from analyses of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of materials from exposed Columbia River basalts has provided insights about how magma from volcanic eruptions millions of years ago shaped the region and why those eruptions did not trigger a global extinction event. (2020-07-17)

Monitoring groundwater changes more precisely
A new method could help to track groundwater changes better than before. Researchers from Potsdam and the USA have compared gravity field data from the GRACE and GRACE-Follow On satellite missions with other measuring methods. They investigated the seasonal water storage in almost 250 river basins in Asia, whose water regime is dominated by monsoon. The results allow the large-scale GRACE data to be scaled down to smaller regions. The researchers report on this in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters. (2020-07-15)

Bacteria with a metal diet discovered in dirty glassware
Newfound bacteria that oxidize manganese help explain the geochemistry of groundwater. (2020-07-15)

Palm trees most abundant in American rainforests
Characteristics of palm trees differ from those of other tropical trees in many ways. In a major new study led by scientists at Uppsala University, Sweden, and University of Campinas, Brazil, they have surveyed the actual numbers of palms in tropical rainforests around the globe. The proportion of palm trees is important to include in calculations of forests' potential carbon storage and in estimates of forested areas' sensitivity to climate change. (2020-07-06)

Cause of abnormal groundwater rise after large earthquake
Abnormal rises in groundwater levels after large earthquakes has been observed all over the world, but the cause has remained unknown due to a lack of comparative data before & after earthquakes. After the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes, a collaboration of scientists from Japan and the US analyzed stable isotope ratios of water samples collected before and after the disaster. This allowed them to clarify the cause of the rise in water level. (2020-07-01)

Food-grade wheatgrass variety released for public use
Farmers can now grow this superfood with environmental and health benefits. (2020-06-24)

Human activity on rivers outpaces, compounds effects of climate change
The livelihoods of millions of people living along the world's biggest river systems are under threat by a range of stressors caused by the daily economic, societal and political activity of humans -- in addition to the long-term effects of climate change, researchers report. (2020-06-19)

Something in the water: Environmental pollutant may be more hazardous than previously thought
Sometimes toxins, such as hazardous wastes and industrial byproducts, seep into groundwater, the source of our drinking water. One such pollutant is perchlorate, a chemical compound used in rocket fuels, fireworks, fertilizers and other materials. The compound is thought to contribute to health issues in humans such as hypothyroidism, the decreased production of hormones from the thyroid gland, which can impact development. (2020-06-05)

Collaborative research addresses need for conservation of springs in drying climate
Hydrogeologist Abe Springer contributed results and implications on springs as refugia from his research group's springs ecohydrology research and helped develop a geomorphological-based classification system for springs ecosystems. (2020-06-03)

Can oilfield water safely be reused for irrigation in California?
Reusing low-saline oilfield water mixed with surface water to irrigate farms in the Cawelo Water District of California does not pose major health risks, as some opponents of the practice have feared, a study led by Duke University and RTI International researchers finds. This finding only applies to questions about the safety in this water district, however. Oilfield water elsewhere will have different chemistry and salinity. (2020-05-22)

New map reveals global scope of groundwater arsenic risk
Up to 220 million people worldwide, with approximately 94% of them in Asia, could be at risk of drinking well water containing harmful levels of arsenic, a tasteless, odorless and naturally occurring poison. (2020-05-21)

Shrub encroachment on grasslands can increase groundwater recharge
A new study led by Adam Schreiner-McGraw, a postdoctoral hydrology researcher at the University of California, Riverside, modeled shrub encroachment on a sloping landscape and reached a startling conclusion: Shrub encroachment on slopes can increase the amount of water that goes into groundwater storage. The effect of shrubs is so powerful that it even counterbalances the lower annual rainfall amounts expected during climate change. (2020-05-15)

Clay layers and distant pumping trigger arsenic contamination in Bangladesh groundwater
To avoid arsenic contamination, many Bangladeshi households access water via private wells drilled to 300 feet or less, beneath impermeable clay layers. Such clay layers have been thought to protect groundwater in the underlying aquifers from the downward flow of contaminants. However, a study published in Nature Communications this week suggests that such clay layers do not always protect against arsenic, and could even be a source of contamination in some wells. (2020-05-07)

Multiple flooding sources threaten Honolulu's infrastructure
In a study published in Scientific Reports, researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, found in the next few decades, sea level rise will likely cause large and increasing percentages of land area to be impacted simultaneously by the three flood mechanisms. Further, they found direct marine inundation represents the least extensive--only three percent of the predicted flooding, while groundwater inundation represents the most extensive flood source. (2020-05-04)

Changes in snowmelt threaten farmers in western US
Farmers in parts of the western United States who rely on snowmelt to help irrigate their crops will be among the hardest hit in the world by climate change, a new study reveals. (2020-04-20)

River-groundwater hot spot for arsenic
Naturally occurring groundwater arsenic contamination is a problem of global significance, particularly in South and Southeast Asian aquifers. To address this problem, an Australian team of scientists with colleagues at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag), have used computer modelling to integrate computer simulations that mimic the complex interactions between groundwater flow, solute transport and geochemical reaction mechanisms to predict the behaviour of arsenic within aquifers -- and where and when pollution may occur in future. (2020-04-07)

Groundwater, a threatened resource requiring sustainable management
The WEARE group at the University of Cordoba analyzed a case of aquifer recovery and concluded that supervision, governance and use of water for high value crops are some of the keys to guaranteeing sustainability of these reserves (2020-04-03)

NASA, University of Nebraska release new global groundwater maps
NASA researchers have developed new satellite-based, weekly global maps of soil moisture and groundwater wetness conditions. (2020-03-31)

OSU research paves way to improved cleanup of contaminated groundwater
Beads that contain bacteria and a slow-release food supply to sustain them can clean up contaminated groundwater for months on end, maintenance free. (2020-03-25)

Co-occurring contaminants may increase NC groundwater risks
Eighty-four percent of the wells sampled in the Kings Mountain Belt and the Charlotte and Milton Belts of the Piedmont region of North Carolina contained concentrations of vanadium and hexavalent chromium that exceeded health recommendations from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. (2020-03-24)

Hidden source of carbon found at the Arctic coast
A previously unknown significant source of carbon just discovered in the Arctic has scientists marveling at a once overlooked contributor to local coastal ecosystems -- and concerned about what it may mean in an era of climate change. (2020-03-20)

FSU Research: Hidden source of carbon found at the Arctic coast
FSU researcher Robert Spencer co-authored a study that showed evidence of undetected concentrations and flows of dissolved organic matter entering Arctic coastal waters, coming from groundwater flows on top of frozen permafrost. This water moves from land to sea unseen, but researchers now believe it carries significant concentrations of carbon and other nutrients to Arctic coastal food webs. (2020-03-20)

Natural organic matter influences arsenic release into groundwater
Millions of people worldwide consume water contaminated with levels of arsenic that exceed those recommended by the World Health Organization. This could cause health problems, such as arsenic poisoning, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Microbes in groundwater release arsenic from sediments, and organic matter helps fuel this reaction. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have discovered that the type of natural organic matter (NOM) influences the rate and level of arsenic release. (2020-03-11)

Fresh groundwater flow important for coastal ecosystems
Groundwater is the largest source of freshwater, one of the world's most precious natural resources and vital for crops and drinking water. Researchers led by Göttingen University developed the first global computer model of groundwater flow into the world's oceans. Their analysis shows 20% of the world's coastal ecosystems - such as estuaries, salt marshes and coral reefs - are at risk of pollutants transported by groundwater flow from the land to the sea. Research appeared in Nature Communications. (2020-03-09)

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