Current Haemoglobin News and Events

Current Haemoglobin News and Events, Haemoglobin News Articles.
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Iron infusion proves effective to treat anaemia in Rural Africa
Iron-deficiency anaemia is a major concern in low-income settings, especially for women. In a new study by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) and partners published yesterday in The Lancet Global Health, researchers found that iron infusion was feasible, safe and, in contrast to the standard iron-deficiency anaemia treatment of oral iron tablets, highly effective in Tanzania. This is the first study to provide evidence of the benefits and safety of iron infusion in a low-income setting. (2020-11-25)

Biofriendly protocells pump up blood vessels
In a new study published today in Nature Chemistry, Professor Stephen Mann and Dr Mei Li from Bristol's School of Chemistry, together with Associate Professor Jianbo Liu and colleagues at Hunan University and Central South University in China, prepared synthetic protocells coated in red blood cell fragments for use as nitric oxide generating bio-bots within blood vessels. (2020-11-20)

New evidence to guide the practice of blood transfusions in children with severe malari
Blood transfusions increase the survival of children admitted to the hospital with complications by severe malaria, and could be beneficial even at higher haemoglobin levels than those currently recommended. These are the main findings of a study led by ISGlobal, a centre supported by ''la Caixa'' Foundation, and published in The Lancet Haematology. (2020-10-19)

High-intensity interval training combining rowing and cycling improves insulin sensitivity, body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness in obesity and type 2 diabetes
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) shows that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) combining cycling and rowing markedly improves insulin sensitivity, body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness in cases of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) (2020-09-23)

What have we learned from COVID-19 in persons with type 1 diabetes?
In a special session on COVID-19 at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), Prof. Catarina Limbert of the University Center of Central Lisbon and Hospital Dona Estefania, Lisbon, Portugal, will a new review of viruses that are known to contribute to the new onset of type 1 diabetes and new evidence that SARS-CoV2 infection needs to be added to this list. (2020-09-22)

Global survey suggests patients most with type 1 diabetes that have adapted to remote medical appointments would continue this post COVID-19 pandemic
A survey of more than 7,000 patients with type 1 diabetes from 89 countries, presented at this year's online Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) shows that three quarters of patients who have adapted to telemedicine appointments would consider continung the use of online or telephone appointments with their doctors (2020-09-22)

Couples can show linked behaviour in terms of risk factors to prevent type 2 diabetes
New research being presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), held online this year, shows that when one half of a couple shows high levels of certain behaviours that prevent type 2 diabetes, such as good diet or exercise, that behaviour also tends to be high in the other half of the couple. (2020-09-20)

Screening UK Biobank blood samples identifies thousands of undiagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes
A study of approximately 200,000 blood samples from the UK Biobank has identified more than 2,000 undiagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes. The study is presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). (2020-09-20)

Online tool informs recovery prospects for sepsis survivors
A doctor at Guy's and St Thomas', working with colleagues at the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC), has developed a tool to predict the risk of readmission to hospital or death in the first year after leaving hospital for adult survivors of sepsis. (2020-09-15)

Genetic information can predict predisposition to rare and common blood diseases
Two large-scale genetic studies have identified the bulk of genetic variation that influences medically-important characteristics of our blood cells. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and colleagues from 101 research institutions world-wide, have studied hundreds of thousands of participants and identified over 7,000 regions of the human genome that control blood cell characteristics, such as the numbers of red and white cells. (2020-09-03)

Trial clarifies use of blood transfusion in anaemic heart attack patients
Restricting blood transfusion in anaemic heart attack patients to those with very low haemoglobin levels saves blood with no negative impact on clinical outcomes. That's the finding of the REALITY trial presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020. Anaemia affects approximately 5-10% of patients with myocardial infarction and is an independent predictor of cardiac events and increased mortality. (2020-09-02)

RNA as a future cure for hereditary diseases
ETH Zurich scientists have developed an RNA molecule that can be used in bone marrow cells to correct genetic errors that affect protein production. Patients suffering from a rare hereditary disease that causes a painful hypersensitivity to sunlight could benefit in future. (2020-08-18)

Iron deficiency during infancy reduces vaccine efficacy
About 40 percent of children around the globe suffer from anaemia because they do not consume enough iron. Now, studies by ETH researchers show that iron deficiency also reduces the protection provided by vaccinations. (2020-07-28)

Malaria's secret to surviving in the blood uncovered
New research from the Francis Crick Institute has found how the malaria parasite protects itself from toxic compounds in red blood cells. (2020-06-30)

Icelandic DNA jigsaw-puzzle brings new knowledge about Neanderthals
An international team of researchers has put together a new image of Neanderthals based on the genes Neanderthals left in the DNA of modern humans when they had children with them about 50,000 years ago. The researchers found the new information by trawling the genomes of more than 27,000 Icelanders. Among other things, they discovered that Neanderthal children had older mothers and younger fathers than the Homo-Sapien children in Africa did at the time. (2020-04-23)

Development of the immune system varies according to age, location and anaemia
Age and geographical location have the strongest influence on immune composition and vaccine responses, with anaemia having a considerable effect, according to a study co-led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), the Babraham Institute and the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, in collaboration with the Manhiça Health Research Center (CISM). The results, published in Science Translational Medicine, will help improve the efficacy of early childhood vaccines in low-income countries. (2020-02-05)

NHS staff shortages mean patients miss out on early bowel cancer diagnosis
Around 1,100 people in England could miss out on the chance of an early stage bowel cancer diagnosis through screening each year because of NHS staff shortages, according to new calculations released by Cancer Research UK. (2020-01-27)

Oxygen shaped the evolution of the eye
The light-absorbing retina in the eye has an exceptionally high metabolic rate which must be met by adequate oxygen supply. This study shows that oxygen diffusion constrained retinal morphology of ancestral vertebrates. It further demonstrates that animals that independently evolved good vision, such as birds, fishes and mammals, concurrently evolved new mechanisms to supply oxygen to their retina. This suggests that retinal oxygen supply was a physiological prerequisite for the evolution of the improved eyesight. (2019-12-10)

Fish more tolerant than expected to low oxygen events
Fish may be more tolerant than previously thought to periods of low oxygen in the oceans, new research shows. (2019-10-22)

RUDN University veterinarians developed a way to protect carp from the harmful effects of ammonia
Veterinarians from RUDN University have developed a way to increase the resistance of carp, the most common fish in fish farms, to the harmful effects of ammonia, which is found in almost all water bodies. The researchers found that the amino acid arginine can be helpful if added to fish food. The article was published in the journal Aquaculture. (2019-10-15)

Researchers find way to kill pathogen resistant to antibiotics
Nagoya University researchers and colleagues in Japan have demonstrated a new strategy in fighting antibiotics resistance: the use of artificial haem proteins as a Trojan horse to selectively deliver antimicrobials to target bacteria, enabling their specific and effective sterilization. The technique killed 99.9% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a potentially deadly, antibiotic-resistant bacterium present in hospitals. The strategy should also work for other dangerous bacteria. The research paper announcing the breakthrough was published in ACS Chemical Biology. (2019-09-20)

Patients with high blood sugar variability much more likely to die than those with stable visit-to-visit readings
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (16-20 Sept) shows that patients with the highest variability in their blood sugar control are more than twice as likely to die as those with the most stable blood sugar measurements. (2019-09-18)

UK study shows increasing proportion of younger adults with type 2 diabetes, with younger cases having a worse metabolic profile
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept. 16-20) shows that the proportion of younger adults being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) has increased since the start of the century. (2019-09-17)

Analysis of studies into alcohol consumption in people with type 2 diabetes suggests
An meta-analysis of studies presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Barcelona, Spain (Sept. 16-20) shows that recommendations to moderate alcohol consumption for people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) may need to be reviewed, since low-to-moderate consumption could have a positive effect on blood glucose and fat metabolism. (2019-09-16)

Types and rates of co-existing conditions in diabetes are different for men and women
A new study presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept. 16-20, 2019) shows that men and women experience different comorbidities (other diseases at the same time) as having diabetes or prediabetes, as well as an unexpectedly high rate of prediabetes among children aged 6-10 years. (2019-09-15)

Deworming programmes for soil-transmitted helminths -- a Cochrane review update
Should global government and philanthropic aid be invested in large public health deworming programmes in low- and middle-income countries? Doctors know intestinal helminths can be unpleasant, but should we be on a mission to 'deworm the world'? Will this really help people living in these poor areas, in terms of weight gain, increases in blood haemoglobin, and better attendance and performance at school? (2019-09-11)

Study shows shorter people are at higher risk of type 2 diabetes
Short stature is associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a new study in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes).Tall stature is associated with a lower risk, with each 10cm difference in height associated with a 41% decreased risk of diabetes in men and a 33% decreased risk in women. (2019-09-09)

Motivational text messages help patients with diabetes
A low-cost text-messaging program improves blood sugar control in patients with diabetes and coronary heart disease. That's the finding of the CHAT-DM randomized trial reported today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology and published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. (2019-08-31)

There's need to intensify diabetes screening amongst older patients living with HIV
This study examines the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in newly diagnosed HIV-positive patients in Buffalo City Municipality, East London, South Africa. (2019-06-28)

Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis for fetal sickle cell disease moves a step closer
Sickle cell disease is a form of anemia that is inherited when both parents are carriers of a mutation in the hemoglobin gene. Currently, it can only be diagnosed in pregnancy by carrying out an invasive test that has a small risk of miscarriage and is therefore sometimes declined by parents. Now, researchers have developed a non-invasive prenatal test for the disease. (2019-06-14)

Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes are at risk of giving birth prematurely
Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of delivering their baby prematurely. The risk increases as blood sugar levels rise, however women who maintain the recommended levels also risk giving birth prematurely. These are the findings from researchers at Karolinska Institutet and the Sahlgrenska Academy in Sweden, published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2019-04-23)

Cool adaptations to the cold
Icefish live in an environment that should be deadly for them. Scientists have now investigated how they still manage to exist there and what evolutionary adaptations they have had to undergo in order to do so. (2019-02-25)

MSMU scientists discovered the role of iron in programmed cell death
Health care professionals from I.M. Sechenov Moscow State Medical University published a review of scientific articles to illustrate how the atoms of iron initiate ferroptosis - programmed cell death. The article was published in the Free Radical Biology and Medicine journal. (2018-12-11)

Remarkably preserved fossil sea reptile reveals skin that is still soft
The remains of an 180 million-year-old ichthyosaur (literally 'fish-lizard') have been analysed, and the fossil is so well-preserved that its soft-tissues retain some of their original pliability. The study, published in Nature, contributes to our understanding on how convergent evolution works, and shows that ichthyosaurs adapted to marine conditions in a way that is remarkably similar to that of modern whales. (2018-12-06)

Why a curious crustacean could hold secret to making renewable energy from wood
Scientists studying gribble -- a curious wood-eating crustacean -- have discovered how they are able to digest wood despite being the only known animal to have a sterile digestive system. The discovery may help to develop cheaper and more sustainable tools for converting wood into biofuel in the future. (2018-12-03)

Sweetened drinks pose greater diabetes risk than other sugary foods
Sweetened drinks pose a greater risk of type 2 diabetes than most other foods containing fructose, a naturally occurring sugar, finds an evidence review published by The BMJ today. (2018-11-21)

Artificial intelligence to accelerate malaria research
Insilico Taiwan, a Taipei-based subsidiary of Insilico Medicine, publishes a new research paper titled 'In Silico Study Reveals How E64 Approaches, Binds to, and Inhibits Falcipain-2 of Plasmodium falciparum that Causes Malaria in Humans' in Scientific Reports. The Results of the study have shown that the binding of E64 and FP2 are facilitated by the amino acids of FP2 located within and nearby the previously identified binding pocket of FP2. (2018-11-12)

Appetite-suppressant lorcaserin decreases risk of developing diabetes and induces remission of high blood sugar in obese and overweight patients
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Berlin, Germany, and published in The Lancet, shows that the appetite-suppressant drug lorcaserin decreases risk of developing diabetes and increases the rates of remission of high blood sugar. (2018-10-04)

Closed-loop 'artificial pancreas' insulin delivery system offers better glucose control and reduced risk of hypoglycaemia
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Berlin, Germany, and published in The Lancet, shows that use of a hybrid day-night closed-loop insulin delivery system is better than sensor-augmented pump therapy for blood sugar control in poorly controlled type 1 diabetes. (2018-10-03)

Testosterone treatment over 10 years can improve or reverse type 2 diabetes in men with low testosterone, and induce significant weight loss
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) reveals that in men with low testosterone who have type 2 diabetes (T2D), testosterone therapy can improve their disease and reverse its progress, and can also induce significant weight loss. (2018-10-02)

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