Current Happiness News and Events

Current Happiness News and Events, Happiness News Articles.
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Why experiences are better gifts for older children
What should we get for our kids this holiday? As children get older, giving them something they can experience (live through) instead of material things makes them happier, according to new research led by Lan Nguyen Chaplin, associate professor of marketing at the University of Illinois Chicago. (2020-11-24)

A regular dose of nature may improve mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic
A study published in Ecological Applications suggests that nature around one's home may help mitigate some of the negative mental health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-11-18)

it's not if, but how people use social media that impacts their well-being
New research from UBC Okanagan indicates what's most important for overall happiness is how a person uses social media. Derrick Wirtz, an associate professor of teaching in psychology at the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, took a close look at how people use three major social platforms--Facebook, Twitter and Instagram--and how that use can impact a person's overall well-being. (2020-11-02)

Water fleas on 'happy pills' have more offspring
Dopamine can trigger feelings of happiness in humans. Water fleas that are exposed to dopamine-regulating substances apparently gain several advantages. (2020-10-29)

Happiness and the evolution of brain size
Serotonin can act as a growth factor for the stem cells in the fetal human brain that determine brain size. (2020-10-23)

Watching nature on TV can boost wellbeing, finds new study
Watching high quality nature programmes on TV can uplift people's moods, reduce negative emotions, and help alleviate the kind of boredom associated with being isolated indoors. (2020-10-13)

From San Diego to Italy, study suggests wisdom can protect against loneliness
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and University of Rome La Sapienza examined middle-aged and older adults in San Diego and Cilento, Italy and found loneliness and wisdom had a strong negative correlation. The wiser the person, the less lonely they were. (2020-10-01)

Loving-kindness meditation will make you happier
Researchers from HSE University compared the effect of two meditation practices - loving-kindness meditation (LKM) and compassion meditation (CM). Loving-kindness meditation turned out to be more effective when it comes to increasing happiness, but, in contrast with previous studies, compassion meditation also did not result in a growth of negative emotions. The paper was published in Mindfulness journal. (2020-09-24)

The key to happiness: Friends or family?
Think spending time with your kids and spouse is the key to your happiness? You may actually be happier getting together with your friends, a new SMU study finds. (2020-09-17)

Inequality of opportunity drags down everyone's motivation
Unequal compensation reduces people's motivation to work, even among those who stand to benefit from unfair advantages, finds a new UCL-led study published in PLOS One. (2020-09-04)

Is being generous the next beauty trend?
Research from Indiana University found that more attractive people are more likely to be givers, and givers are rated as more attractive. (2020-08-31)

Childhood connection to nature has many benefits but is not universally positive, finds review
A literature review by Dr Louise Chawla, Professor Emerita at the University of Colorado, finds that children are happier and more likely to protect the natural world when they have a greater connection to it, but this connection is complex and can also generate negative emotions linked to issues like climate change. (2020-08-06)

To improve students' mental health, Yale study finds, teach them to breathe
When college students learn specific techniques for managing stress and anxiety, their well-being improves across a range of measures and leads to better mental health, a new Yale study finds. (2020-07-31)

Looking up to the Joneses: Consequences of the perceptions of white wealth
In a pair of studies, social psychologists propose that widespread perceptions that white people are wealthy, and that Black people are poor, may shape the way people experience their own status. (2020-07-30)

Hedonism leads to happiness
Relaxing on the sofa or savoring a delicious meal: Enjoying short-term pleasurable activities that don't lead to long-term goals contributes at least as much to a happy life as self-control, according to new research from the University of Zurich and Radboud University in the Netherlands. The researchers therefore argue for a greater appreciation of hedonism in psychology. (2020-07-27)

When it comes to happiness, what's love got to do with it?
Researchers from Michigan State University conducted one of the first studies of its kind to quantify the happiness of married, formerly married and single people at the end of their lives to find out just how much love and marriage played into overall well-being. (2020-07-23)

Men 'less supportive' in more egalitarian nations
A new 42-country study has found that the more gender egalitarian the country, the less likely men are to support women's causes. (2020-07-23)

Health and happiness depend on each other, Psychological Science says
New research adds to the growing body of evidence that happiness not only feels good, it is good for your physical health, too. (2020-07-22)

Time to get real on the power of positive thinking -- new study
Positive thinking has long been extolled as the route to happiness, but it might be time to ditch the self-help books after a new study shows that realists enjoy a greater sense of long-term wellbeing than optimists. (2020-07-06)

Prospective teachers misperceive Black children as angry
Prospective teachers appear more likely to misperceive Black children as angry than white children, which may undermine the education of Black youth, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-07-02)

From age 8 we spontaneously link vocal to facial emotion
Do children have to wait until age 8 to recognize -- spontaneously and without instructions -- the same emotion of happiness or anger depending on whether it is expressed by a voice or on a face? Scientists from the University of Geneva and the Swiss Centre for Affective Sciences have compared the ability of children and adults to make a spontaneous link between a heard voice and the corresponding emotional expression on a natural or virtual. (2020-06-30)

UTEP study examines COVID-19 stress, coping strategies, and well-being
Emre Umucu, Ph.D., assistant professor of rehabilitation counseling, and Beatrice Lee, an incoming rehabilitation counseling faculty member, examined the perceived stress levels and coping mechanisms related to COVID-19, and how coping affects well-being in people with self-reported chronic conditions and disabilities. (2020-05-29)

New study examines impact of major life events on wellbeing
Researchers examined the effect of 18 major life events on wellbeing. (2020-05-28)

The prevention of childhood obesity would require stricter advertising regulations
Spain ranks fifth among European countries for childhood obesity. Sugar-sweetened beverages and soft drinks are consumed by 81% of Spanish children weekly. Mireia Montaña and Mònika Jiménez, researchers of the Open University of Catalonia and the UPF Department of Communication, respectively, have performed a study based on the assumption that advertising is one of the factors that contributes to the obesogenic environment. (2020-05-26)

Study finds people are more satisfied after quitting the status quo
A new paper in The Review of Economic Studies, published by Oxford University Press, finds that people who use a coin toss to decide on an important change are more likely to follow through with that decision, are more satisfied with that decision, and report a higher overall happiness after a six-month period. (2020-05-18)

Emotional well-being while home gardening similar to other popular activities, study finds
Princeton researchers found that gardening at home had a similar effect on emotional well-being (or happiness) as biking, walking or dining out. The benefits were similar across racial boundaries and between urban and suburban residents, and it was the only activity out of the 15 studied for which women and people with low incomes reported the highest emotional well-being. The results suggest that household gardens could be key to providing food security in urban areas and making cities more sustainable and livable. (2020-05-11)

Gratitude interventions don't help with depression, anxiety
Go ahead and be grateful for the good things in your life. Just don't think that a gratitude intervention will help you feel less depressed or anxious. In a new study, researchers at The Ohio State University analyzed results from 27 separate studies that examined the effectiveness of gratitude interventions on reducing symptoms of anxiety and depression. The results showed that such interventions had limited benefits at best. (2020-03-09)

Spending on experiences versus possessions advances more immediate happiness
Consumers are happier when they spend their money on experiential purchases versus material ones, according to research from the McCombs School of Business at the University of Texas at Austin. (2020-03-09)

NUS study reveals positive connection between nature experiences and happiness globally
An AI analysis of photographs posted on social media revealed a positive association between nature and happiness globally. (2020-03-09)

We can make predictions about relationships - but is this necessary?
'Predictions as to the longevity of a relationship are definitely possible,' says Dr Christine Finn from the University of Jena. In the long-term study 'pairfam', she held regular interviews over seven years with nearly 2,000 couples, 16 per cent of which broke up during this period. 'Right at the outset of a relationship, one can find typical features - that is to say certain prediction variables - that provide information on whether or not the relationship will be long-lasting.' (2020-03-03)

Biometric devices help pinpoint factory workers' emotions and productivity
Happiness, as measured by a wearable biometric device, was closely related to productivity among a group of factory workers in Laos, reveals a recent study. (2020-03-02)

Connectedness to nature makes children happier
A new study has shown that connectedness to nature makes children more likely to perform sustainable behaviors, which in turn gives them greater levels of happiness. In light of these findings and the current environmental issues facing our planet, the research team highlight the need for initiatives and education that promotes contact with nature -- for the good of the planet and for children's well-being. (2020-02-26)

Gun owners aren't happier, don't sleep better at night
New research challenges claims by special interest groups and popular culture about the personal benefits of gun ownership. University of Arizona sociologist Terrence Hill found that gun owners and non-gun owners report about the same levels of happiness and sleep disturbance. (2020-02-04)

Measuring the world of social phenomena
Economists working with Professor Marko Sarstedt from University of Magdeburg are demanding that the same scientific standards be applied to economics and the behavioral sciences in general as are used in the natural sciences. (2020-01-20)

Unhappy revolutionaries
Researchers from HSE University have shown that the 2010 happiness level of citizens from Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, and other Arab countries could provide a much more accurate forecast of the Arab Spring events than purely economic indices, such as GDP per capita and unemployment rate. (2019-12-30)

Luxury consumption can fuel 'impostor syndrome' among some buyers
If you have the money, what could be wrong about purchasing a Swiss watch or an Italian sports car? It turns out, luxury goods don't always represent ''feel good'' purchases for the buyer. Some luxury consumers worry that they may not deserve these items and their actions have been inauthentic. These feelings represent what researchers are calling the ''impostor syndrome from luxury consumption,'' according to a new report. (2019-12-20)

Humans' ability to read dogs' facial expressions is learned, not innate
In a recent study published in Scientific Reports, a team of researchers from Germany and the United Kingdom assessed how experience with dogs affects humans' ability to recognize dog emotions. Participants who grew up in a cultural context with a dog-friendly attitude were more proficient at recognizing dog emotions. This suggests that the ability to recognize dogs' expressions is learned through age and experience and is not an evolutionary adaptation. (2019-11-11)

Reading the past like an open book: Researchers use text to measure 200 years of happiness
Using innovative new methods researchers at the University of Warwick, University of Glasgow Adam Smith Business School and The Alan Turing Institute in London have built a new index that uses data from books and newspaper to track levels of national happiness from 1820. Their research could help governments to make better decisions about policy priorities. (2019-10-14)

Modern family roles improve life satisfaction for parents
Increased equality has a positive effect on mothers and fathers. Thanks to greater freedom to strike an individual balance between caring for children and working in paid employment, mothers and fathers today are happier with their lives than parents were 20 or 30 years ago, a study by sociologists at the University of Zurich has shown. (2019-10-08)

Relatively unhappy
Temporary or informally employed people are less satisfied with their lives than those with a permanent job. The most apparent differences can be seen in countries with strict labour laws. Tatiana Karabchuk and Natalia Soboleva from HSE University investigated the legislative impact on the social well-being of employed populations in European countries and Russia. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10902-019-00152-4 (2019-10-08)

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