Current Health insurance News and Events

Current Health insurance News and Events, Health insurance News Articles.
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Medicaid expansion may result in earlier diagnosis of colon cancer
The Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion for low-income people appears to lead to earlier diagnosis of colon cancer, enhanced access to care, and improved surgical care for patients with this common cancer. (2020-11-23)

Study involving seven children's hospitals shows COVID-19 typically mild in children
In the largest U.S. study of its kind to date, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and other PEDSnet sites report that of more than 135,000 pediatric patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 in pediatric health systems, 4% tested positive for the virus. However, the researchers also found patients from ethnic minorities, adolescents, patients with history of public insurance, and those with certain underlying medical conditions were more likely to test positive. (2020-11-23)

U.S. should look at how other high-income countries regulate health care costs
Structuring negotiations between insurers and providers, standardizing fee-for-service payments and negotiating prices can lower the United States' health care spending by slowing the rate at which healthcare prices increase, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-11-22)

Artificial intelligence-based tool may help diagnose opioid addiction earlier
Researchers have used machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence, to develop a prediction model for the early diagnosis of opioid use disorder. The advance is described in Pharmacology Research & Perspectives. (2020-11-18)

EMS dispatches for asthma greatly reduced after expanded access to health insurance
The expansion of health insurance in New York City under the Affordable Care Act resulted in a significant reduction in the dispatch of ambulances for asthma emergencies, a study by Massachusetts General Hospital has found. Researchers suggest that the reason for this decline is improved access to outpatient management of asthma. The finding has major implications for the broader public health system. (2020-11-11)

Diseases of despair diagnoses increase in Pennsylvania
Medical diagnoses involving alcohol-related disorders, substance-related disorders and suicidal thoughts and behaviors -- commonly referred to as diseases of despair -- increased in Pennsylvania health insurance claims between the years 2007 and 2018, according to researchers from Penn State Clinical and Translational Science Institute and Highmark Health Enterprise Analytics. (2020-11-10)

Under-insured transgender americans turn to riskier sources for gender-affirming hormones
Transgender people who lack access to insurance coverage for gender-affirming hormone therapy are more likely to use hormones from sources other than a licensed prescriber, compared to those with insurance coverage. (2020-11-10)

Postpartum care fails to provide women with key recommended services
Most women are receiving fewer than half the services recommended during their comprehensive postpartum medical checkup, according to a study by University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers. (2020-11-10)

Serious disparities in care and outcomes found among Black and non-white heart patients
Adults who are Black or from other underrepresented racial/ethnic groups received up to 10% fewer early treatments for heart problems compared to white patients. When compared to whites, Black patients had longer hospital stays and fewer discharges to home. Hispanics, Asians, Pacific Islanders and Native Americans all had higher in-hospital death rates than white patients. (2020-11-09)

'Diseases of despair' have soared over past decade in US
'Diseases of despair', such as substance abuse, alcohol dependency, and suicidal thoughts and behaviours, have soared in the US over the past decade, reveals an analysis of health insurance claims data published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2020-11-09)

Expanded birth control coverage may help reduce disparities in unplanned pregnancies
Removing out-of-pocket costs for contraception may help reduce the income-related disparities that play such a significant role in unintended pregnancies, a new Michigan Medicine-led study suggests. (2020-11-06)

Underinsurance is growing, but HSAs aren't keeping up: BU study
High deductible health plans (HDHPs) have become much more common among all racial/ethnic and income groups, but the health savings accounts (HSAs) that make these plans potentially workable are far less common among Black, Hispanic, and lower-income enrollees--and the gap is growing. (2020-11-06)

Health care use drops during pandemic; switch to telemedicine creates disparities
One of the first studies to quantify the cuts in elective medical care experienced in March and April found that the number of mammograms and colonoscopies dropped by more than 65% during the period. Lower rates of telemedicine use were observed among patients who reside in lower-income or predominately non-white zip codes. (2020-11-05)

ACA results in fewer low-income uninsured, but non-urgent ER visits haven't changed
Since the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) Medicaid expansion program went into effect 10 years ago, the U.S. has seen a larger reduction in the number of uninsured low-income, rural residents, compared to their urban contemporaries. But the likelihood of repeated visits to emergency rooms for non-urgent reasons has not decreased. (2020-11-05)

Excessive alcohol consumption during the COVID-19 pandemic
The full impact of COVID-19 on alcohol use is not yet known, but rates have been rising during the first few months of the pandemic. There's an urgent need for public health and medical responses to address harmful alcohol use. (2020-11-02)

New simulation finds max cost for cost-effective health treatments
As health care costs balloon in the U.S., experts say it may be important to analyze whether those costs translate into better population health. A new study led by a Penn State researcher analyzed existing data to find a dividing line - or ''threshold - for what makes a treatment cost-effective or not. (2020-11-02)

Two million lost health coverage, thousands died prematurely in Trump's first 3 years
A new Harvard study finds that even before COVID-19, more than 2 million individuals lost health coverage during the first three years of the Trump Administration. This contraction of coverage since 2016 caused as many as 25,180 excess deaths, even before the pandemic. If the Supreme Court overturns the Affordable Care Act, the researchers estimate that nearly 20 million Americans would lose coverage, resulting in up to 68,000 excess deaths. (2020-10-29)

Workplace interruptions lead to physical stress
Using an experiment conducted in a simulated group office environment, ETH researchers have proved for the first time that repeated workplace interruptions cause the body to increase the release of stress hormones. And they do so to a higher degree than the perceived psychological stress. (2020-10-28)

People with disabilities view health care access as human right, study shows
Analysis of national survey data of Americans with disabilities finds they overwhelmingly view health care access as a human right, but many barriers stand in their way, including insurance tied to employment and policy makers not listening. They also view the ACA positively, even though they span the political spectrum. (2020-10-27)

Poverty linked to higher risk of death in children with cancer undergoing transplant
Despite the increasing use and promise of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as curative therapy for children with cancer and other life-threatening diseases, new research suggests that children transplanted for cancer are more likely to die from treatment-related complications if they live in poorer neighborhoods. The study, published today in the journal Blood, also found that having Medicaid versus private insurance, another marker of poverty, was associated with a higher chance of dying. (2020-10-26)

Racial, socioeconomic disparities in extensive-stage small cell lung cancer treatment
A new study shows that Black individuals with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer are less likely to receive chemotherapy for their disease compared to white and other racial groups. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center, the results indicate that individuals who are Black, elderly, uninsured, or have non-private health insurance and lower education levels, were less likely to be treated with chemotherapy for this type of lung cancer. (2020-10-26)

Axing the ACA means young adults with cancer lose coverage
A new study led by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has quantified the impact of repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) for 18 to 25-year-old cancer patients, who are covered by their parents' health insurance. (2020-10-22)

Study reveals disparities in access to high-quality surgical care
Among U.S. patients diagnosed with breast, prostate, lung, or colorectal cancer from 2004 to 2016, those who were uninsured or had Medicare or Medicaid were less likely than privately insured patients to receive surgical care at high-volume hospitals. The findings are published in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS). (2020-10-21)

Researchers seek to end unexpected bills for screening colonoscopies
Nearly 1 in 8 commercially insured patients nationwide who underwent an elective colonoscopy between 2012 and 2017 performed by an in-network provider received ''surprise'' bills for out-of-network expenses, often totaling hundreds of dollars or more. (2020-10-15)

Survey: More US Adults want the government to have a bigger role in improving peoples' lives than before the pandemic
The share of US adults who support an active government role in society increased by more than 40 percent during the initial pandemic response--up from 24 percent in September 2019 to 34 percent in April 2020. (2020-10-15)

Big drug costs for small patients with rare diseases, study finds
Only about one in every 170 children take them. But ''orphan drugs'' accounted for 1 in every 15 private insurance dollars spent on children's health care in the United States in 2018, according to a new study. That's up 65% from just five years before. And even though insurance companies pay much of the cost of high-priced orphan drugs that treat rare childhood diseases, families' share of the cost has risen rapidly. (2020-10-06)

Spouses of ICU patients may be at increased risk for cardiac events or hospitalization
The intensive care unit (ICU) admission of one spouse can be a risk factor for a cardiovascular event for the other spouse within a few weeks after the first spouse's ICU hospitalization. In this review of a Japanese medical database, spouses of patients admitted to the ICU for more than two days were themselves more likely to visit a doctor or be hospitalized for a cardiovascular reason compared to people without a spouse in the ICU. (2020-10-05)

Black and Hispanic people more likely to live in high-risk flood zones, study finds
Black and Hispanic people and people with low incomes are more likely to live in areas at high risk of flooding from natural disasters than white and Asian people, according to a new study led by the University of Arizona. (2020-10-05)

ACA reduced out-of-pocket health costs for families with kids, but they still need help
The percentage of low- and middle-income families with children that had burdensome out-of-pocket health care costs fell following the 2014 implementation of the health insurance marketplaces and Medicaid expansion provisions of the Affordable Care Act, known widely as Obamacare. (2020-09-28)

Study links higher level of exercise to 25% to 32% lower risk of all-cause mortality in people with type 2 diabetes
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), held online this year, shows that having a greater exercise capacity is associated with a significantly decreased all-cause mortality risk of between 25-33% in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). (2020-09-20)

Private health insurers paid hospitals 247% of what medicare would
While recent hospital price transparency initiatives have increased information about procedure-level prices available to patients, employers who pay for most private insurance have little usable information about the prices negotiated on their behalf. A new study based on data from more than half the nation's hospitals finds that prices paid to hospitals nationally during 2018 by privately insured patients averaged 247% of what Medicare would have paid, with wide variation in prices among states. (2020-09-18)

Three common medications lower risk and mortality for lung cancer
Combined use of aspirin, statins, and metformin is associated with decreased lung cancer incidence and mortality, according to a study published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology (JTO). The JTO is the official journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. (2020-09-17)

The public charge rule: What physicians can do to support immigrant health
Physicians from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine summarize current knowledge on the public benefits included in the 'public charge' rule and offer suggestions for family physicians to support the health of their immigrant patients and families. The authors conclude that 'family physicians can effectively respond to patient and immigrant community concerns about these changes by providing outreach education, access to primary health care, and referrals to legal and social services.' (2020-09-15)

Expenditures for primary care may affect how primary care is delivered
This study looks at trends in out-of-pocket and total visit expenditures for visits to primary care physicians. Using the 2002-2017 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), the authors described changes in out-of-pocket and total visit expenditures for primary care visits for Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance. If current trends continue, the authors would expect increasing difficulty with primary care physician access, particularly for Medicaid patients. (2020-09-15)

Improving the transition from pediatric to adult rheumatology care
As children with chronic rheumatic illnesses age, it's important that they experience a smooth transition from pediatric to adult care. A study published in Arthritis Care & Research has identified certain factors that are important during this time. (2020-09-10)

Study highlights possible causes of racial disparities in prostate cancer deaths
New research provides insights on the potential causes of racial disparities in deaths following prostate cancer surgery. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS). (2020-09-08)

Medicaid expansion improved insurance stability for low-income pregnant women
Medicaid expansion improved the stability of insurance coverage for low-income women in the months leading up to and right after their baby's birth. Findings showed that with the expansion of Medicaid, there was a 10- percentage-point decrease in women going uninsured or changing insurance plans in the time around their pregnancy. This is the first study to examine Medicaid's impact on the stability of insurance from before to after childbirth. (2020-09-08)

Prior health insurance coverage disruptions linked to issues with healthcare access
A new American Cancer Society study finds health insurance coverage disruptions in the prior year led to issues with healthcare access and affordability for currently insured cancer survivors. The study appears in the Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2020-08-31)

COVID-19 vaccines are moving fast, but will americans agree to get them?
Only one in three US adults received the flu vaccine in 2018, a number that has critical implications for the impending flu season, which threatens to overwhelm medical resources and lead to tens of thousands of deaths at a time when Americans are still reeling from the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-08-26)

Researchers introduce new theory to calculate emissions liability
A new study by Michigan Tech researchers questions conventional methods of calculating carbon emissions liability based on point source pollution by introducing new ''bottleneck'' theory. (2020-08-25)

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