Nav: Home

Current Health risk News and Events

Current Health risk News and Events, Health risk News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 1 | 22 Results
Gall bladder removal may reduce stroke risk in patients with gallstones
Previous research indicates that gallstones are linked with an increased risk of stroke. (2019-06-05)
Managing young women at high risk of heart disease
Deaths from heart disease have decreased in recent decades, but these decreases have not occurred in women younger than 50. (2019-02-11)
Analysis examines migraine's link to higher stroke risk
Migraine with aura was associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study, but a recent post-hoc analysis published in Headache reveals unexpected results suggesting that onset of such migraines before age 50 years is not associated with such risk. (2019-01-24)
Personalized melanoma genomic risk triggers family conversations
A new study published in the British Journal of Dermatology indicates that personalized melanoma genomic risk information can prompt discussions about skin cancer prevention and skin examinations with family and health professionals. (2017-08-09)
Inhaled steroids may increase pneumonia risk in people with asthma
Use of inhaled corticosteroids was linked with an increased risk of pneumonia in a study of individuals with asthma. (2017-04-20)
Frequent sauna bathing protects men against dementia
Frequent sauna bathing can reduce the risk of dementia, according to a recent study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland. (2016-12-16)
Australian study finds no method reliable in assessing suicide risk for mental health patients
An Australian study has cast doubt on the effectiveness of the tools used by medical professionals to assess suicide risk in mental health patients, prompting calls for a review of the allocation of resources based on the assessments. (2016-06-10)
Drinking coffee may reduce the risk of liver cirrhosis
Regular consumption of coffee was linked with a reduced risk of liver cirrhosis in a review of relevant studies published before July 2015. (2016-02-01)
Arthritis may be a major driver of poverty
Developing arthritis increases the risk of falling into poverty, especially for women, new research shows. (2015-09-08)
Five daily portions of fruit and vegetables may be enough to lower risk of death
Eating five daily portions of fruit and vegetables is associated with a lower risk of death from any cause, particularly from cardiovascular disease, but beyond five portions appears to have no further effect, finds a study published on the BMJ website today. (2014-07-29)
Genetic screening could reveal hidden high risk for coronary heart disease
Researchers of the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, University of Helsinki, and Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare have shown that genetic marker information can improve risk evaluation of coronary heart disease. (2013-05-20)
Cancer risk evaluation: Methods and trends
The development of almost all cancer is influenced by environmental factors, argues Dr. (2011-07-14)
Cancer risk found for long-term hormone therapy
Using postmenopausal hormone therapy for more than 15 years increases a woman's risk of developing breast cancer, particularly among leaner women, according to research at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. (2010-08-10)
Intimate kissing quadruples risk of meningitis in teenagers
Intimate kissing with multiple partners almost quadruples a teenager's risk of meningococcal disease, finds a study published online by the BMJ today. (2006-02-09)
Dummies (pacifiers) reduce sudden infant deaths
Use of a dummy seems to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), finds a study published online by the BMJ today. (2005-12-08)
Risk of breast cancer with HRT may be lower than we think
A woman's risk of developing breast cancer while taking hormone replacement therapy may be lower than we think, suggest researchers in this week's BMJ. (2005-08-04)
Urinary incontinence runs in the family
Women are more likely to develop urinary incontinence if their mother or older sisters are incontinent, finds a study from Norway in this week's BMJ. (2004-10-14)
Have parents behaved irrationally towards MMR?
Parents seem to neglect a real risk to their children (injuries from road crashes) but amplify an insignificant risk (autism caused by MMR vaccine), argues a senior researcher in this week's BMJ. (2003-09-25)
Lower risk thresholds for heart disease needed
General practitioners should use lower risk thresholds for heart disease when they are treating high blood pressure in people from ethnic minorities, finds a study in this week's BMJ. (2002-11-28)
Smoking triples risk of a common type of skin cancer
Exposure to sunlight is generally considered to be the most important risk factor for a common form of skin cancer, squamous cell carcinoma. (2000-12-27)
Surgery and anesthesia increase risk for ischemic stroke
A new Mayo Clinic study shows that people who have surgery and anesthesia are at increased risk for ischemic stroke (stroke caused by an obstruction to the blood supply). (2000-04-10)
Perceived Risks Of Breast Cancer Are Vastly Overestimated
Recently notices on London's Underground warned that women have a one in 12 risk of developing breast cancer. (1998-11-06)
Page 1 of 1 | 22 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...