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Current Healthcare costs News and Events, Healthcare costs News Articles.
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Survey shows surveillance for antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues as core focus
A survey by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America demonstrates that surveillance for antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues to be a core focus for healthcare facilities. (2019-07-17)
Massive potential health gains in switching to active transport -- Otago study
Swapping short car trips for walking or biking could achieve as much health gain as ongoing tobacco tax increases, according to a study from the University of Otago, New Zealand. (2019-07-17)
Adults with HIV who have compassionate care providers start and remain in treatment longer
Rutgers researchers find patients who perceive their primary care providers as lacking empathy and not willing to include them in decision making are at risk for abandoning treatment or not seeking treatment at all. (2019-07-14)
Dartmouth study examines association between care management and outcomes in Medicare ACOs
New research from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice finds that Accountable Care Organization (ACO)-reported care management and coordination activities were not associated with improved outcomes or lower spending for patients with complex needs. (2019-07-12)
Coping strategy therapy for family dementia carers works long-term
A programme of therapy and coping strategies for people who care for family members with dementia successfully improves the carers' mental health for at least a six-year follow-up, finds a UCL study. (2019-07-11)
Larger drug trials that intervene earlier needed for Alzheimer's disease
There are currently no drugs that stop or inhibit Alzheimer's disease. (2019-07-10)
Repair of aged tissue can be enhanced by inhibiting signals from neighbouring cells
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered how regenerative capacity of intestinal epithelium declines when we age. (2019-07-10)
Geisel study finds downside risk contracts still less common for ACOs
Dartmouth-led study shows that while the number and variety of contracts held by Accountable Care Organizations have increased dramatically in recent years, the proportion of those bearing downside risk has seen only modest growth. (2019-07-01)
Meals on Wheels drivers good early warning system for senior's health and safety issues
Meal delivery drivers bringing food to homebound seniors can be an effective early-warning system for health and safety problems, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society by researchers at the West Health Institute, Brown University and Meals on Wheels America. (2019-06-27)
A hidden truth: Hospital faucets are often home to slime and biofilm
Hand hygiene is a critical component of infection prevention in hospitals, but the unintended consequences include water splashing out of a sink to spread contaminants from dirty faucets according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). (2019-06-26)
New female external catheter technology reduces CAUTI by 50%
Hospital-wide introduction of new female external catheter technology halved the number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). (2019-06-26)
New blood test for detecting Alzheimer's disease
Researchers from Lund University, together with the Roche pharmaceutical company, have used a method to develop a new blood marker capable of detecting whether or not a person has Alzheimer's disease. (2019-06-25)
More monitoring needed to reduce post-hospitalization urinary tract infections
Broader monitoring of patients is needed to reduce the number of people who develop a urinary tract infection after being discharged from the hospital, new research suggests. (2019-06-25)
Nutrition is the missing ingredient in home health today, new study shows
For nearly 5 million Americans a year, home healthcare is critical as they recover from illness or injury. (2019-06-24)
Close-range blast exposure & neurodegenerative processes among those with genetic risk for AD
A new study raises the possibility that close-range blast exposure among veterans with a genetically higher risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), may make them more susceptible to degradation of their white matter, the part of the brain made of fiber connections called axons that connect nerve cells. (2019-06-24)
Understanding C. auris transmission with the healthcare environment
Researchers have now shown that patients who are heavily colonized with Candida auris on their skin can shed the fungus and contaminate their surroundings. (2019-06-23)
The richer the pickings, the more honest the people
The more money there is in a lost wallet, the more likely it is to be returned to its owner, researchers from the universities of Zurich, Michigan and Utah show in a global study. (2019-06-20)
Study shows healthcare workers often care for patients while ill
Large numbers of healthcare workers risk transmitting respiratory viruses to patients and co-workers by attending work even when they have symptoms, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal for the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2019-06-18)
Three quarters of Americans concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals
Nearly three-quarters (74%) of Americans are concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals, according to new survey data released today by ASHP (American Society of Health-System Pharmacists). (2019-06-17)
Encouraging critically necessary blood donation among minorities
Better community education and communication are critical for increasing levels of blood donation among minorities, according to a study by researchers at Georgia State University and Georgia Southern University. (2019-06-13)
Pre-qualifying education and training helps health workers tackle gender based violence
Gender-based violence (GBV) could be tackled more effectively by giving healthcare students wider and more practical education and training in identifying and responding to the 'warning signs' presented among patients they will encounter in professional life, according to a new study. (2019-06-12)
Finnish healthcare and social welfare system provides a variety of e-services to citizens
Major progress has been made in the range of available eHealth services in Finland. (2019-06-11)
Veteran-directed care program is effective
A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System researchers finds that a program that gives veterans flexible budgets for at-home caregivers is at least as effective as other veteran purchased-care services. (2019-06-11)
Clarifying the economic value of adjusting the power consumption
The economic value of demand response that adjusts the power consumption has not been clarified. (2019-06-10)
BU researchers develop new metamaterial that can improve MRI quality and reduce scan time
New magnetic metamaterial could be used as an additive technology to increase the imaging power of lower-strength MRI machines, increasing the number of patients seen by clinics and decreasing associated costs, without any of the risks that come with using higher-strength magnetic fields. (2019-06-10)
Costs of care similar or lower at teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals
Total costs of care are similar or somewhat lower among teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals among Medicare beneficiaries treated for common medical and surgical conditions, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. (2019-06-07)
Reducing opioid prescriptions after C-sections
There's a better way to take care of patients after C-sections to help them heal faster and manage pain without increasing their risk of long-term opioid use, Michigan Medicine researchers say. (2019-06-05)
Dartmouth study reveals how ACOs use home visits to improve care and reduce hospital use
Dartmouth-led study offers new details about how Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are using home visits to improve care management and identify patient needs while aiming to reduce costs. (2019-06-04)
Texas A&M research team develops bioinks to print therapeutics in 3D
A team of researchers at Texas A&M University has developed an innovative way to print therapeutics in 3D for regenerative medicine. (2019-06-03)
Implementation of Oregon paid family leave to ensure equality critical, research finds
Oregon is considering a bill to implement paid family leave, House Bill 2005, following in the footsteps of Washington, which approved a similar policy in 2017. (2019-06-03)
Depression sufferers at risk of multiple chronic diseases
Women who experience symptoms of depression are at risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, research led by The University of Queensland has found. (2019-05-30)
Emergency room or doctor's office?
A new study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier, examines the relationship between the way individuals perceive and respond to threats (threat sensitivity) and where they most frequently seek medical care. (2019-05-30)
Study finds lower ER triage scores associated with delayed antibiotics delivery for sepsis patients
in a new study, researchers at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City found that antibiotic delivery was significantly faster -- by up to 32 minutes -- for sepsis patients being treated in an emergency department if they were assigned a slightly higher score on a subjective one-to-five acuity scale commonly used for patient triage. (2019-05-22)
Successful HIV effort prompts call for clinics to expand mental health services on site
Increasing access to mental health services improves HIV outcomes among vulnerable patients, a new study suggests. (2019-05-21)
Do family members belong in ICU during procedures? Study finds clinicians mixed on practice
Do family members of loved ones who are critically ill and being treated in an intensive care unit at a hospital belong there when clinicians are performing bedside procedures? (2019-05-20)
New computer-based predictive tool more accurately forecasts outcomes for respiratory patients
Are electronic health records and computer calculations a better, more accurate way to predict clinical outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease? (2019-05-20)
Electric car switch on for health benefits
Could the health benefits and reduced costs to healthcare systems be enough to justify subsidizing charging infrastructure to allow society to switch from the internal combustion engine to electric vehicles faster than current trends predict? (2019-05-16)
Weight loss medicines underutilized by veterans
Despite the availability of new weight management medications and several clinical guidelines recommending their use as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for obesity, a new study has found that their use is extremely low (about one percent) among eligible Veterans. (2019-05-15)
Tech-saavy people more likely to trust digital doctors
Would you trust a robot to diagnose your cancer? According to researchers at Penn State, people with high confidence in machine performance and also in their own technological capabilities are more likely to accept and use digital healthcare services and providers. (2019-05-10)
Percutaneous ablation vs. surgery for hepatocellular carcinoma
Compared to surgery, percutaneous liver ablation interventions (IRs) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are associated with lower inhospital mortality, length of hospital stay (LOS), and hospitalization costs, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2019 Annual Meeting, set for May 5-10 in Honolulu, Hawaii. (2019-05-07)
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