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Current Healthcare costs News and Events, Healthcare costs News Articles.
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Solar panel demand causing spike in worldwide silver prices
Rising demand for solar panels is having a major effect on the worldwide price of silver, which could lead to solar panel production costs becoming far higher in the future, new research from the University of Kent has demonstrated. (2019-04-17)
Achieving sugar reduction targets could cut child obesity and healthcare costs
Reducing the sugar content of certain foods by 2020, in line with UK government policy targets, could cut child obesity and related illness, and save the NHS in England £286 million over 10 years, suggests a study published by The BMJ today. (2019-04-17)
The pressure to prescribe: Antibiotic stewardship in the outpatient setting
Outpatient healthcare providers inappropriately prescribed antibiotics to 40 percent of patients in a major Veterans Affairs healthcare system, a higher figure than in previous studies examining outpatient antibiotic use, according to a new study appearing in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology published by Elsevier. (2019-04-16)
Labeling added sugars content on packaged foods and beverages could lower heart disease/diabetes risk and cut healthcare costs
Labeling food products and beverages for added sugars could generate substantial health benefits over the next 20 years, potentially preventing nearly 1 million cases of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and lowering healthcare costs. (2019-04-15)
FDA added sugar label could be a cost-effective way to improve health, generate savings
The FDA's mandatory added sugar labeling policy for packaged foods and beverages could generate important health gains and cost-savings for the healthcare system and society, according to a new modeling study led by researchers from Tufts University and the University of Liverpool. (2019-04-15)
Primary care services account for a small share of Medicare spending, study finds
Some states including Oregon and Rhode Island have begun adopting minimum primary care spending goals because health system orientation toward primary care is associated with higher quality, better outcomes and lower costs. (2019-04-15)
Hospital study finds substantial proportion of patients and healthcare workers shed flu virus before symptoms appear
New research examining influenza transmission in a tertiary hospital finds that a substantial proportion of patients and healthcare works shed the flu virus before the appearance of clinical symptoms. (2019-04-15)
Eliminating routine but low-value preoperative tests for cataract surgery patients associated with cost savings
Eliminating routine but unnecessary procedures before people undergo cataract surgery has the potential to save costs and resources for hospitals serving lower-income patients. (2019-04-15)
National handwashing campaign reduces incidence of Staphylococcus aureus infection in Australia's hospitals
Since its implementation in 2009, the National Australian Hand Hygiene Initiative (NHHI) has seen significant, sustained improvements in hand hygiene compliance among Australian healthcare workers, and reduced risks of potentially fatal healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus infection, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam. (2019-04-14)
Study finds low hand hygiene compliance on ICUs
Healthcare workers on intensive care units (ICUs) are regularly missing opportunities to clean their hands during the care of patients, despite its critical importance for infection control, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16). (2019-04-14)
Medicaid could save $2.6 billion within a year if just 1% of recipients quit smoking
Reducing smoking, and its associated health effects, among Medicaid recipients in each state by just 1 percent would result in $2.6 billion in total Medicaid savings the following year, according to new research by UC San Francisco. (2019-04-12)
High prevalence of healthcare-associated infections and low testing rates found in European hospitals and long-term care facilities
The European Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (ECDC) estimates that 9 million cases of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) occur across Europe each year -- with around one in 15 patients in acute care hospitals and one in 24 residents in long-term care facilities having at least one infection on any given day. (2019-04-12)
New guideline decreases breast cancer re-operation rates
A UBC medical student has determined that a new surgical guideline is making a difference for breast cancer patients. (2019-04-09)
Social insecurity also stresses chimpanzees
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology conducted behavioral observations and collected urine samples for cortisol analysis of male chimpanzees of the Tai National Park, Ivory Coast, during periods of intense male-male competition. (2019-04-05)
Study calculates costs associated with smoking by patients with cancer
A study released today in JAMA Network Open reported that smoking after a cancer diagnosis is associated with substantial additional costs of cancer treatment. (2019-04-05)
Vision loss associated with longer hospital stays, more readmissions, greater costs
Researchers analyzed health care claims data for older adults (12,330 Medicare beneficiaries and 11,858 with commercial health insurance) to see if vision loss was associated with longer stays and higher readmission rates and costs when patients were hospitalized with common illnesses. (2019-04-04)
Government and NHS leaders could do more to encourage collaborative relationships between healthcare
The Nuffield Council on Bioethics has published a briefing note outlining the factors that can contribute to disagreements between parents and healthcare staff about the care and treatment of critically ill babies and young children. (2019-04-03)
Are healthcare providers 'second victims' of medical errors?
Four women with family members who died as a result of preventable medical error penned an editorial for The BMJ urging abandonment of the term 'second victims' to describe healthcare providers who commit errors. (2019-04-02)
Shift work increases diabetes and heart disease risk
Many studies have shown that shift work is associated with heart and metabolic diseases, but new research in Experimental Physiology has clarified how shift work can have a long-term effect on the risk of heart disease and diabetes. (2019-04-02)
Growth in telehealth from 2016 to 2017 outpaces other venues of care
From 2016 to 2017, private insurance claim lines for services rendered via telehealth as a percentage of all medical claim lines grew 53 percent nationally, more than any other venue of care studied for that variable in the second annual edition of FH Healthcare Indicators®. (2019-04-01)
Smoking during pregnancy increases the risk that your baby will become obese
Using discarded foreskins from circumcisions, researchers were able to identify a potential cellular mechanism that connects a mother's smoking while pregnant with an increased risk of offspring obesity later in life (2019-03-29)
Abandon the term 'second victim' say families of patients who died after medical errors
Families of patients who died after medical errors argue that it's time to abandon the term 'second victim' to describe doctors who are involved in a medical error. (2019-03-27)
Giving intravenous therapy to children at home is costly, lowers parents' quality of life
When treating patients, doctors sometimes overlook how their decisions impact a world they never see: a patient's home life. (2019-03-25)
A viable alternative to Medicare-for-all? We can and must do better!
Medicare-for-all, a solution that would bring United States healthcare policies more in line with other industrial nations, faces strong opposition and is unlikely to be enacted in the foreseeable future. (2019-03-25)
Affordable Care Act delivers significant benefits for women
According to a new study appearing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, the rate of health insurance coverage and access to affordable acute and preventive care services improved for women after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). (2019-03-21)
Childhood adversity linked to higher out-of-pocket health care costs in adulthood
A study has found that out-of-pocket health care spending and medical debt are substantially higher when adults have a history of adverse childhood experiences. (2019-03-21)
Disease burden in osteoarthritis is similar to rheumatoid arthritis
Osteoarthritis (OA) has traditionally been viewed as a highly prevalent but milder condition when compared with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and some may believe that it is part of a normal aging process requiring acceptance, not treatment. (2019-03-20)
Improper removal of personal protective equipment contaminates health care workers
More than one-third of healthcare workers were contaminated with multi-drug resistant organisms (MDRO) after caring for patients colonized or infected with the bacteria, according to a study published today in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2019-03-20)
Healthy food prescriptions could save lives and money
Healthy food prescriptions through Medicare and Medicaid could generate substantial health gains and be highly cost-effective, according to a study published March 19 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Yujin Lee and Dariush Mozaffarian of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, Massachusetts, United States and colleagues. (2019-03-19)
Prescribing healthy food in Medicare/Medicaid is cost effective, could improve health
A team of researchers modeled the health and economic effects of healthy food prescriptions in Medicare and Medicaid. (2019-03-19)
Researchers find eight new unique gene mutations in patients with hereditable heart muscle disease
In a new study from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, researchers have identified eight new gene mutations that may cause or contribute to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a form of heart disease not caused by known external influences, such as high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, or diseased coronary arteries. (2019-03-18)
No increased risk of complications for joint replacement in ambulatory surgery setting
Researchers conducted a study to compare patient outcomes and costs for in-patient hip and knee replacement surgeries to those performed in an ambulatory surgery center. (2019-03-14)
Doctor video visits increase access to healthcare but could risk fragmentation
In today's fast-paced digital society, virtual doctor visits are on the rise and offer patients a more convenient way to receive medical care from anywhere. (2019-03-14)
UK failing to provide universal health coverage by charging undocumented migrant kids
By charging undocumented child migrants for healthcare, the UK is failing to provide universal health coverage -- in contravention of the Sustainable Development Goals and its obligations under the UN convention on children's rights -- argue infectious disease and global health experts in an editorial published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2019-03-14)
Report: Despite being skilled producers, Danish farmers face poorer conditions than their European counterparts
AGRICULTURE Danish farmers are good at exploiting their productive potential, but higher production costs make it difficult for them to compete with other EU nations. (2019-03-13)
Drug that prevents lung problems in older preemies also lowers costs
A drug given to nearly 10 percent of all pregnant women to prevent severe respiratory ailments in preterm babies also reduces healthcare costs, according to a new study by Columbia researchers. (2019-03-13)
Subsidies for infection control to healthcare institutions help reduce infection levels
Researchers compared three types of infection control subsidies and found that under a limited budget, a dollar-for-dollar matching subsidy, in which policymakers match hospital spending for infection control measures, was the most effective at reducing the number of hospital-acquired infections. (2019-03-12)
Australian study shows specialist clinics are cost-effective for chronic wound care
A study published in PLOS ONE by academics in Australia and the UK, shows that specialist wound management clinics are the most cost-effective route for the care of chronic wounds with better results for patients. (2019-03-07)
VA study evaluates quality indicators for hormone therapy in menopausal women
Improvements are needed in VA's prescribing of hormone therapy for menopausal women veterans, concludes a study in the Journal for Healthcare Quality, the peer-reviewed journal of the National Association for Healthcare Quality. (2019-03-07)
Surprise billing debate continues to transfix state and federal policy makers
This briefing paper seeks to bring needed clarity to the feverish, ongoing surprise billing debate underway on the state and federal level. (2019-03-06)
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