Current Healthcare News and Events

Current Healthcare News and Events, Healthcare News Articles.
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Towards accessible healthcare for all in sub-Saharan Africa
A state-of-the-art georeferenced database of public healthcare facilities. In the prestigious journal PNAS, a new study published with the contribution of the RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment (EIEE) provides a comprehensive planning-oriented, inequality-focused analysis of different types of healthcare accessibility in sub-Saharan Africa. (2020-11-30)

COVID-19 amplifies inequalities in healthcare access for ethnic minority and migrant women
In their recent research paper, published in the Feminist Legal Studies journal, City, University of London's Dr Sabrina Germain and Dr Adrienne Yong say existing barriers to medical care for these marginalised women have been intensified by the pandemic, and must be examined so as to understand their poorer health outcomes. (2020-11-27)

Growing risks of STIs in over-45s
Sexually-active over-45s are at a high risk of contracting STIs because people do not want to talk about holder people having sex, a report has found. (2020-11-23)

Decennial 2020 research sets the agenda for advancing safe healthcare
More than 700 studies, including 250 international abstracts, highlighting worldwide progress in preventing and controlling healthcare-associated infections and addressing antibiotic resistance were published today as part of the proceedings from the Sixth Decennial International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections. The Sixth Decennial, a conference co-hosted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and SHEA, was cancelled in March due to the COVID-19 pandemic. All abstracts accepted for the meeting appear in a supplement for the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. (2020-11-02)

Hospital floors are hotspot for bacteria, creating route of transfer to patients
The floors of hospital rooms are frequently contaminated with antibiotic-resistant bacteria within hours of patient admission, creating a route of transfer of potentially dangerous organisms to patients, according to a study published today as part of the proceedings from Decennial 2020: The Sixth International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections. Decennial 2020, an initiative of the CDC and SHEA, was cancelled in March due to the pandemic. (2020-10-30)

Healthcare app reduces symptoms of COPD compared to regular treatment
A Southampton-developed healthcare app that helps people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) manage their condition can speed up recovery after hospital admission and reduce flare-ups of symptoms, a newly published study has shown. (2020-10-30)

Poor women in Bangladesh reluctant to use healthcare
A study, published in PLOS ONE, found that the women living in Dhaka slums were reluctant to use institutionalised maternal health care for fear of having to make undocumented payments, unfamiliar institutional processes, lack of social and family support, matters of honour and shame, a culture of silence and inadequate spousal communication on health issues. (2020-10-23)

Healthcare's earthquake: Lessons from COVID-19
Leaders and clinician researchers from Beth Israel Lahey Health propose using complexity science to identify strategies that healthcare organizations can use to respond better to the ongoing pandemic and to anticipate future challenges to healthcare delivery. (2020-10-23)

COVID-19 a double blow for chronic disease patients
The COVID-19 pandemic has escalated into a 'syndemic' for people with chronic illnesses, a new UNSW study analysing data from low and middle-income countries shows. (2020-10-23)

The mental health impact of pandemics for front line health care staff
New research shows the impact that pandemics have on the mental health of front-line health care staff. Researchers investigated how treating patients in past pandemics such as SARS and MERS affected the mental health of front-line staff. They found that over a third experienced anxiety or depression, almost a quarter experienced PTSD. The team hope that their work will help highlight the impact that the Covid-19 pandemic could be having on the mental health of doctors and nurses worldwide. (2020-10-16)

SHEA updates guidance for healthcare workers with HIV, hepatitis
In light of the low rate of transmission and advances in treatments for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV, SHEA released updated guidance for healthcare personnel living with these bloodborne pathogens based on the latest available science. The SHEA White Paper, ''Management of Healthcare Personnel Living with Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, or Human Immunodeficiency Virus in United States Healthcare Institutions,'' was published online in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. (2020-10-14)

Four in 10 extra deaths in Lombardy not linked to COVID-19
The study, published in PLOS ONE, looked at the number of deaths in each of the 7,251 local authority areas of Italy during the first four months of the year and compared these figures with predictions based on data from 2016-2019. It found that Lombardy had the most excess deaths of any region in Italy. (2020-10-09)

Majority of Americans trust Biden to lead US healthcare system amid COVID-19 pandemic
Ability to manage the pandemic and reducing healthcare costs are equally important to Americans in determining their vote for president. (2020-10-08)

Women and men executives have differing perceptions of healthcare workplaces according to a survey report in the Journal of Healthcare Management
Healthcare organizations that can attract and retain talented women executives have the advantage over their peers, finds a special report in the September/October issue of the Journal of Healthcare Management, an official publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE). (2020-10-05)

An app monitors cancer patients' health status and rewards participation
Gamification is becoming increasingly common in educational settings, but can also be used in other fields such as health. Researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Zaragoza have developed the Close2U application, which enables healthcare staff to monitor cancer patients' mood and physical discomfort using daily questionnaires. In return for the information they provide, users receive motivational resources such as advice or songs that they can exchange with other patients, fostering interaction. (2020-09-25)

Lockdown impact: Worsening symptoms for people with bone, joint and muscle pain
A new study reveals the impact of lockdown for people with bone, joint and muscle pain. It finds that the majority of people with musculoskeletal pain reported increased symptoms. And those who experienced most social isolation and loneliness were less likely to access healthcare. The findings are the result of a survey of more than 600 people across the UK to see how people with bone, joint and muscle pain coped in lockdown. (2020-09-25)

Dartmouth study offers new details on pediatric mental health boarding
A Dartmouth-led study, published in the journal Pediatrics, offers new details on the prevalence of pediatric mental health boarding in emergency departments across the country while identifying factors among patients and hospitals that increase the likelihood of the practice. (2020-09-25)

Study suggests elderly care home outbreaks in England were caused by multiple indepedent infections and also within-home spread
New research presented at this week's ESCMID Congress on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online 23-25 September) shows that outbreaks of COVID-19 in elderly care homes were caused by multiple independent infections from outside, plus within care home spread. There is also evidence of transmission between residents and healthcare workers, including paramedics, possibily linking care home outbreaks to hospital outbreaks. (2020-09-23)

Study shows that 40% of healthcare workers asymptomatic when COVID-19 positive, raising risk of silent transmission
A review of studies (meta-analysis) presented at this year's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Diseases (ECCVID, online 23-25 September) shows that 40% of healthcare workers who test positive for COVID-19 were asymptomatic, raising the risk of silent transmission in healthcare settings. (2020-09-22)

SHEA endorses requiring recommended vaccinations for healthcare personnel, educators and students
All healthcare personnel should be immunized against vaccine preventable diseases recommended by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (CDC/ACIP) as a condition of employment, according to a new policy statement by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The broad statement of support of the vaccination recommendations, published in the journal Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, suggests medical contraindications as the only exception to receiving recommended immunizations. (2020-09-17)

Preparing future clinicians to intervene in opioid crisis
Opioid use disorder and overdose have reached unprecedented levels around the world. In the United States, remediation of pain is one of the most common reasons American adults seek healthcare. Therefore, it is vital that clinicians practicing in diverse roles and settings have a clinical understanding of pain and substance use disorders as well as knowledge about public health and opioid policy interventions. (2020-09-17)

Study offers real world perspective on how Black patients experience mental healthcare
In a novel study the authors hope will contribute to improved patient care, Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Regenstrief Institute researchers examine how Black patients with mental health concerns evaluate verbal and non-verbal communication during treatment. The researchers, led by Johanne Eliacin, PhD, evaluate how perceptions of racial bias influence patient engagement with their providers. (2020-09-15)

Guidance balances staph infection prevention in critically ill infants with family contact
NICUs should balance prevention of Staph infections in critically ill infants with the need for skin-to-skin contact with parents and siblings, according to a Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America white paper published in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. The paper serves as a clinical companion to the new recommendations from the CDC's Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee to help clinicians in NICUs make decisions about infection prevention, detection, and control practices. (2020-09-14)

Autistic adults have a higher rate of physical health conditions
Autistic individuals are more likely to have chronic physical health conditions, particularly heart, lung, and diabetic conditions, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge. The results are published in the journal Autism. (2020-09-10)

A spillover effect: Medicaid expansion leads to healthier dietary choices
Besides providing health care to millions, the Medicaid program helps recipients make healthier food choices, according to work UConn research recently published in the journal Health Economics. (2020-09-08)

Risk factors for mortality in diabetic patients discharged from hospital identified
When patients are discharged from Hospital those with diabetes are at an increased risk of readmission and mortality, there are guidelines for discharging patients with diabetes to reduce these risks, however researchers from the Institute of Digital Healthcare at WMG, University of Warwick and Warwick Medical School have identified known risk factors for mortality in adult patients discharged from hospital with diabetes. (2020-09-02)

One in two Americans fear a major health event could lead to bankruptcy
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to put lives and livelihoods at risk, 1 in 2 Americans say they fear a major health event could lead them to file for bankruptcy, marking a 5% increase since 2019. The new research comes from the West Health-Gallup US Healthcare Study, an ongoing series of surveys on the impact of high healthcare costs on American lives. (2020-09-01)

Prior health insurance coverage disruptions linked to issues with healthcare access
A new American Cancer Society study finds health insurance coverage disruptions in the prior year led to issues with healthcare access and affordability for currently insured cancer survivors. The study appears in the Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2020-08-31)

Veterans undergoing elective PCI at community hospitals may have increased chance of death compared to those treated at VA hospitals
Veterans who underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable angina at a community facility were at a 33% increased hazard, or chance, of death compared to patients treated within the Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System, according to an analysis of nearly 9,000 veterans published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2020-08-24)

Clear will and capacity to help emergency care in crisis
Operators beyond the confines of conventional emergency healthcare are willing and able to assist in a crisis, a University of Gothenburg study shows. Hotels, schools, and veterinary clinics are among those ready for inclusion in a crisis preparedness system, to enable emergency healthcare to be scaled up with the utmost speed. (2020-08-20)

Community health workers reduce maternal, foetal and new-born deaths, study finds
Large forces of trained community health workers and standardised healthcare systems could reduce the number of maternal, newborn and foetal deaths, a study has recommended. (2020-08-20)

A Reverse Approach to Vessel Surgery May Boost Clinical Outcomes in Dialysis
A new approach to a surgical procedure required for dialysis offers better long-term viability and a lower chance of complications compared with conventional techniques, according to work involving rats and 274 patients. (2020-08-19)

Patient experiences in medical imaging and radiation therapy: The importance of skilled patient care professionals
I went into the MRI bracing for the wave of panic I knew would come as soon as I was strapped down and inside the machine.'' In ''A Tale of Two MRIs'' by patient Lelainia Lloyd, her experiences--good and bad--are shared as part of an upcoming special issue of the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, published by Elsevier. (2020-08-10)

Large proportion of NHS workers may have already had COVID-19
New research finds a high prevalence of anosmia among NHS healthcare workers between February and April. Nearly two thirds of participants lost their sense of smell or taste in the period. The study also finds a strong association between smell loss and positive Covid-19 test results, with those who had lost their sense of smell being five times more likely to test positive - suggesting a large proportion of healthcare workers may have already been infected. (2020-08-06)

Lottery for ventilators
In times of acute shortages, the orthodoxy in healthcare is for scarce resources to be allocated based on who has the best chance of survival. However, Dr Diego Silva, from the University of Sydney, argues this simple utility calculus is unjust because it exacerbates existing social inequities. In a paper published in Chest Journal, Dr Silva proposes a radical departure from current convention by arguing ventilators should be allocated to COVID-19 patients via a lottery. (2020-08-05)

Greater financial integration generally not associated with better healthcare quality
New findings from a Dartmouth-led study, published in the August issue of Health Affairs, show that larger, more integrated healthcare systems do not generally deliver better quality care, and that there is significant variation in quality scores across hospitals and physician practices, regardless of whether they are independent or owned by larger systems. Policy makers should ensure that mergers or acquisitions due to pandemic-associated financial stress adhere to current antitrust law. (2020-08-03)

High COVID-19 risk among health care workers, especially those from minority backgrounds
At the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in the US and the UK, frontline healthcare workers -- Black, Asian, and minority ethnic backgrounds -- faced much higher risks of testing positive. (2020-07-31)

Frontline healthcare workers more likely to test positive for COVID despite PPE
A new study published today in Lancet Public Health has found that front-line healthcare workers with adequate personal protective equipment (PPE) have a three-fold increased risk of a positive SARS-CoV-2 test, compared to the general population. (2020-07-31)

Study highlights mental health risks facing healthcare workers during pandemic
A new study finds healthcare workers in the United States are struggling with a suite of mental-health challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study reports healthcare workers are at greater risk than the general public of experiencing health problems such as depression. (2020-07-30)

New survey finds large racial divide in concern over ability to pay for COVID-19 treatment
People of color are far more likely to worry about their ability to pay for healthcare if diagnosed with COVID-19 than their White counterparts, according to a new survey from nonprofit West Health and Gallup. By a margin of almost two to one (58% vs. 32%), non-White adults report that they are either 'extremely concerned' or 'concerned' about the potential cost of care. That concern is three times higher among lower-income versus higher-income households (60% vs. 20%). (2020-07-29)

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