Nav: Home

Current Healthcare News and Events

Current Healthcare News and Events, Healthcare News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Degenerative eye condition (AMD) to affect 77 million Europeans by 2050
The leading cause of irreversible blindness and severely impaired eyesight -- age-related macular degeneration, or AMD for short- - is expected to affect 77 million Europeans by 2050, reveal the latest calculations, published online in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. (2019-11-11)
Widely used health algorithm found to be racially biased; remedying in progress
A nationally deployed healthcare algorithm -- one of the largest commercial tools used by health insurers to inform health care decisions for millions of people each year -- shows significant racial bias in its predictions of the health risks of black patients, researchers report. (2019-10-24)
Find FH® machine learning model flags individuals with FH for first time at national level
The FH Foundation announced that a machine learning algorithm effectively identified individuals with probable familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) for the first time at a national scale through its FIND FH initiative. (2019-10-21)
Severe allergic reactions identified with peripherally inserted central catheters
Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) that use a magnetized tip to guide insertion were associated with serious allergic reactions in patients, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal for the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2019-10-08)
New evidence on the mistreatment of women during childbirth
New evidence from a World Health Organization (WHO)-led study in four countries shows more than one-third of women experience mistreatment during childbirth in health facilities. (2019-10-08)
Moral distress and moral strength among clinicians in health care systems
Nurse burnout impacts both nurses and patients, and significantly influences the retention of nurses in the healthcare setting, research shows. (2019-09-23)
LGBT+ women face barriers to healthcare
New study suggests diversity messaging is not filtering down to frontline staff. (2019-09-19)
Dartmouth study examines prevalence of screening for social needs
A new study from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice finds that most US physician practices and hospitals report screening patients for at least one social need, a trend that is expected to increase in the future, and that practices that care for disadvantaged patients report higher screening rates. (2019-09-18)
Hospital-wide use of high-risk antibiotics associated with more C. difficile infections
Higher hospital-wide use of four classes of antibiotics thought to increase the risk of the dangerous intestinal illness Clostridioides difficile were associated with increased prevalence of hospital-associated C. difficile, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2019-09-16)
Success story or artificial inflation? Hospital performance in CAUTIs
A new study links changes in the way catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are defined and artificially improved hospital performance scores. (2019-09-16)
Bribery linked with difficulty accessing healthcare in sub-Saharan Africa
In a large survey in sub-Saharan Africa, adults who said they had paid a bribe for healthcare in the past year were more than four times as likely to report difficulty in obtaining care than those who had not paid bribes. (2019-08-21)
Doctors tell parents too late that their child is near death, survey suggests
Doctors tell parents too late that their child is near death, suggest the results of a small survey, published online in the journal BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. (2019-08-20)
Restructuring Medicare Shared Savings Program can yield 40% savings in health costs
More than a trillion dollars was spent on healthcare in the United States in 2018, with Medicare and Medicaid accounting for some 37% of those expenditures. (2019-08-08)
'Extensive gender discrimination in healthcare access' for women in India, suggests study
Women in India face 'extensive gender discrimination' in access to healthcare, suggests a study of outpatient appointments at one major tertiary care hospital in Delhi, and published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-08-07)
Researchers identify specific genetic vulnerabilities to PTSD among US veterans
A genome-wide association study of more than 165,000 US veterans confirms a genetic vulnerability to post-traumatic stress disorder, specifically noting abnormalities in stress hormone response and/or functioning of specific brain regions. (2019-07-29)
US emergency medical services underrepresented of women and minorities
Women and minority groups are underrepresented in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in the US and workforce diversity is not likely undergo big changes anytime soon, according to a new 10-year study of almost 700,000 newly certified emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics, published in Prehospital Emergency Care. (2019-07-25)
Hospital-acquired C. diff associated with substantial costs
A study by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America determines the cost and length of stay attributed to hospital-acquired Clostridioides difficile infections. (2019-07-24)
Multiple concurrent central lines increases risk for bloodstream infection
A study by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America demonstrates the relationship between multiple concurrent central lines and the increased risk for bloodstream infections. (2019-07-24)
Lancet series, co-authored by NYU's Benzian, calls for 'radical reform' of oral healthcare
A special Lancet Series on Oral Health, published today in The Lancet, presents an 'urgent need for radical reform' of oral healthcare to prioritize prevention and integrate dentistry into primary care. (2019-07-18)
Survey shows surveillance for antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues as core focus
A survey by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America demonstrates that surveillance for antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues to be a core focus for healthcare facilities. (2019-07-17)
Body and mind need care in mental illness
The 18-year life expectancy gap between people with mental illness and the general population can only be bridged by protecting patients' physical and mental health, according to a new study. (2019-07-17)
Adults with HIV who have compassionate care providers start and remain in treatment longer
Rutgers researchers find patients who perceive their primary care providers as lacking empathy and not willing to include them in decision making are at risk for abandoning treatment or not seeking treatment at all. (2019-07-14)
Dartmouth study examines association between care management and outcomes in Medicare ACOs
New research from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice finds that Accountable Care Organization (ACO)-reported care management and coordination activities were not associated with improved outcomes or lower spending for patients with complex needs. (2019-07-12)
A hidden truth: Hospital faucets are often home to slime and biofilm
Hand hygiene is a critical component of infection prevention in hospitals, but the unintended consequences include water splashing out of a sink to spread contaminants from dirty faucets according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). (2019-06-26)
New female external catheter technology reduces CAUTI by 50%
Hospital-wide introduction of new female external catheter technology halved the number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). (2019-06-26)
New blood test for detecting Alzheimer's disease
Researchers from Lund University, together with the Roche pharmaceutical company, have used a method to develop a new blood marker capable of detecting whether or not a person has Alzheimer's disease. (2019-06-25)
More monitoring needed to reduce post-hospitalization urinary tract infections
Broader monitoring of patients is needed to reduce the number of people who develop a urinary tract infection after being discharged from the hospital, new research suggests. (2019-06-25)
Close-range blast exposure & neurodegenerative processes among those with genetic risk for AD
A new study raises the possibility that close-range blast exposure among veterans with a genetically higher risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), may make them more susceptible to degradation of their white matter, the part of the brain made of fiber connections called axons that connect nerve cells. (2019-06-24)
Understanding C. auris transmission with the healthcare environment
Researchers have now shown that patients who are heavily colonized with Candida auris on their skin can shed the fungus and contaminate their surroundings. (2019-06-23)
Study shows healthcare workers often care for patients while ill
Large numbers of healthcare workers risk transmitting respiratory viruses to patients and co-workers by attending work even when they have symptoms, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal for the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2019-06-18)
Three quarters of Americans concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals
Nearly three-quarters (74%) of Americans are concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals, according to new survey data released today by ASHP (American Society of Health-System Pharmacists). (2019-06-17)
Encouraging critically necessary blood donation among minorities
Better community education and communication are critical for increasing levels of blood donation among minorities, according to a study by researchers at Georgia State University and Georgia Southern University. (2019-06-13)
Pre-qualifying education and training helps health workers tackle gender based violence
Gender-based violence (GBV) could be tackled more effectively by giving healthcare students wider and more practical education and training in identifying and responding to the 'warning signs' presented among patients they will encounter in professional life, according to a new study. (2019-06-12)
Finnish healthcare and social welfare system provides a variety of e-services to citizens
Major progress has been made in the range of available eHealth services in Finland. (2019-06-11)
Depression sufferers at risk of multiple chronic diseases
Women who experience symptoms of depression are at risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, research led by The University of Queensland has found. (2019-05-30)
Emergency room or doctor's office?
A new study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier, examines the relationship between the way individuals perceive and respond to threats (threat sensitivity) and where they most frequently seek medical care. (2019-05-30)
Study finds lower ER triage scores associated with delayed antibiotics delivery for sepsis patients
in a new study, researchers at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City found that antibiotic delivery was significantly faster -- by up to 32 minutes -- for sepsis patients being treated in an emergency department if they were assigned a slightly higher score on a subjective one-to-five acuity scale commonly used for patient triage. (2019-05-22)
Successful HIV effort prompts call for clinics to expand mental health services on site
Increasing access to mental health services improves HIV outcomes among vulnerable patients, a new study suggests. (2019-05-21)
Do family members belong in ICU during procedures? Study finds clinicians mixed on practice
Do family members of loved ones who are critically ill and being treated in an intensive care unit at a hospital belong there when clinicians are performing bedside procedures? (2019-05-20)
New computer-based predictive tool more accurately forecasts outcomes for respiratory patients
Are electronic health records and computer calculations a better, more accurate way to predict clinical outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease? (2019-05-20)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#540 Specialize? Or Generalize?
Ever been called a "jack of all trades, master of none"? The world loves to elevate specialists, people who drill deep into a single topic. Those people are great. But there's a place for generalists too, argues David Epstein. Jacks of all trades are often more successful than specialists. And he's got science to back it up. We talk with Epstein about his latest book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.