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Current Healthcare News and Events, Healthcare News Articles.
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A hidden truth: Hospital faucets are often home to slime and biofilm
Hand hygiene is a critical component of infection prevention in hospitals, but the unintended consequences include water splashing out of a sink to spread contaminants from dirty faucets according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). (2019-06-26)
New female external catheter technology reduces CAUTI by 50%
Hospital-wide introduction of new female external catheter technology halved the number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). (2019-06-26)
New blood test for detecting Alzheimer's disease
Researchers from Lund University, together with the Roche pharmaceutical company, have used a method to develop a new blood marker capable of detecting whether or not a person has Alzheimer's disease. (2019-06-25)
More monitoring needed to reduce post-hospitalization urinary tract infections
Broader monitoring of patients is needed to reduce the number of people who develop a urinary tract infection after being discharged from the hospital, new research suggests. (2019-06-25)
Close-range blast exposure & neurodegenerative processes among those with genetic risk for AD
A new study raises the possibility that close-range blast exposure among veterans with a genetically higher risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), may make them more susceptible to degradation of their white matter, the part of the brain made of fiber connections called axons that connect nerve cells. (2019-06-24)
Understanding C. auris transmission with the healthcare environment
Researchers have now shown that patients who are heavily colonized with Candida auris on their skin can shed the fungus and contaminate their surroundings. (2019-06-23)
Study shows healthcare workers often care for patients while ill
Large numbers of healthcare workers risk transmitting respiratory viruses to patients and co-workers by attending work even when they have symptoms, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal for the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2019-06-18)
Three quarters of Americans concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals
Nearly three-quarters (74%) of Americans are concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals, according to new survey data released today by ASHP (American Society of Health-System Pharmacists). (2019-06-17)
Encouraging critically necessary blood donation among minorities
Better community education and communication are critical for increasing levels of blood donation among minorities, according to a study by researchers at Georgia State University and Georgia Southern University. (2019-06-13)
Pre-qualifying education and training helps health workers tackle gender based violence
Gender-based violence (GBV) could be tackled more effectively by giving healthcare students wider and more practical education and training in identifying and responding to the 'warning signs' presented among patients they will encounter in professional life, according to a new study. (2019-06-12)
Finnish healthcare and social welfare system provides a variety of e-services to citizens
Major progress has been made in the range of available eHealth services in Finland. (2019-06-11)
Depression sufferers at risk of multiple chronic diseases
Women who experience symptoms of depression are at risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, research led by The University of Queensland has found. (2019-05-30)
Emergency room or doctor's office?
A new study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier, examines the relationship between the way individuals perceive and respond to threats (threat sensitivity) and where they most frequently seek medical care. (2019-05-30)
Study finds lower ER triage scores associated with delayed antibiotics delivery for sepsis patients
in a new study, researchers at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City found that antibiotic delivery was significantly faster -- by up to 32 minutes -- for sepsis patients being treated in an emergency department if they were assigned a slightly higher score on a subjective one-to-five acuity scale commonly used for patient triage. (2019-05-22)
Successful HIV effort prompts call for clinics to expand mental health services on site
Increasing access to mental health services improves HIV outcomes among vulnerable patients, a new study suggests. (2019-05-21)
Do family members belong in ICU during procedures? Study finds clinicians mixed on practice
Do family members of loved ones who are critically ill and being treated in an intensive care unit at a hospital belong there when clinicians are performing bedside procedures? (2019-05-20)
New computer-based predictive tool more accurately forecasts outcomes for respiratory patients
Are electronic health records and computer calculations a better, more accurate way to predict clinical outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease? (2019-05-20)
Tech-saavy people more likely to trust digital doctors
Would you trust a robot to diagnose your cancer? According to researchers at Penn State, people with high confidence in machine performance and also in their own technological capabilities are more likely to accept and use digital healthcare services and providers. (2019-05-10)
Induced labor not more expensive to health care system than spontaneous labor
The results of a joint study between University of Utah Health and Intermountain Healthcare show inducing labor one week early costs the same as waiting for spontaneous labor. (2019-05-03)
Information technology can support antimicrobial stewardship programs
The incorporation of information technology (IT) into an antimicrobial stewardship program can help improve efficiency of the interventions and facilitate tracking and reporting of key metrics. (2019-04-23)
Hospital study finds substantial proportion of patients and healthcare workers shed flu virus before symptoms appear
New research examining influenza transmission in a tertiary hospital finds that a substantial proportion of patients and healthcare works shed the flu virus before the appearance of clinical symptoms. (2019-04-15)
National handwashing campaign reduces incidence of Staphylococcus aureus infection in Australia's hospitals
Since its implementation in 2009, the National Australian Hand Hygiene Initiative (NHHI) has seen significant, sustained improvements in hand hygiene compliance among Australian healthcare workers, and reduced risks of potentially fatal healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus infection, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam. (2019-04-14)
Study finds low hand hygiene compliance on ICUs
Healthcare workers on intensive care units (ICUs) are regularly missing opportunities to clean their hands during the care of patients, despite its critical importance for infection control, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16). (2019-04-14)
High prevalence of healthcare-associated infections and low testing rates found in European hospitals and long-term care facilities
The European Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (ECDC) estimates that 9 million cases of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) occur across Europe each year -- with around one in 15 patients in acute care hospitals and one in 24 residents in long-term care facilities having at least one infection on any given day. (2019-04-12)
Government and NHS leaders could do more to encourage collaborative relationships between healthcare
The Nuffield Council on Bioethics has published a briefing note outlining the factors that can contribute to disagreements between parents and healthcare staff about the care and treatment of critically ill babies and young children. (2019-04-03)
Are healthcare providers 'second victims' of medical errors?
Four women with family members who died as a result of preventable medical error penned an editorial for The BMJ urging abandonment of the term 'second victims' to describe healthcare providers who commit errors. (2019-04-02)
Shift work increases diabetes and heart disease risk
Many studies have shown that shift work is associated with heart and metabolic diseases, but new research in Experimental Physiology has clarified how shift work can have a long-term effect on the risk of heart disease and diabetes. (2019-04-02)
Abandon the term 'second victim' say families of patients who died after medical errors
Families of patients who died after medical errors argue that it's time to abandon the term 'second victim' to describe doctors who are involved in a medical error. (2019-03-27)
A viable alternative to Medicare-for-all? We can and must do better!
Medicare-for-all, a solution that would bring United States healthcare policies more in line with other industrial nations, faces strong opposition and is unlikely to be enacted in the foreseeable future. (2019-03-25)
Affordable Care Act delivers significant benefits for women
According to a new study appearing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, the rate of health insurance coverage and access to affordable acute and preventive care services improved for women after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). (2019-03-21)
Improper removal of personal protective equipment contaminates health care workers
More than one-third of healthcare workers were contaminated with multi-drug resistant organisms (MDRO) after caring for patients colonized or infected with the bacteria, according to a study published today in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2019-03-20)
Researchers find eight new unique gene mutations in patients with hereditable heart muscle disease
In a new study from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, researchers have identified eight new gene mutations that may cause or contribute to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a form of heart disease not caused by known external influences, such as high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, or diseased coronary arteries. (2019-03-18)
Doctor video visits increase access to healthcare but could risk fragmentation
In today's fast-paced digital society, virtual doctor visits are on the rise and offer patients a more convenient way to receive medical care from anywhere. (2019-03-14)
UK failing to provide universal health coverage by charging undocumented migrant kids
By charging undocumented child migrants for healthcare, the UK is failing to provide universal health coverage -- in contravention of the Sustainable Development Goals and its obligations under the UN convention on children's rights -- argue infectious disease and global health experts in an editorial published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2019-03-14)
Subsidies for infection control to healthcare institutions help reduce infection levels
Researchers compared three types of infection control subsidies and found that under a limited budget, a dollar-for-dollar matching subsidy, in which policymakers match hospital spending for infection control measures, was the most effective at reducing the number of hospital-acquired infections. (2019-03-12)
VA study evaluates quality indicators for hormone therapy in menopausal women
Improvements are needed in VA's prescribing of hormone therapy for menopausal women veterans, concludes a study in the Journal for Healthcare Quality, the peer-reviewed journal of the National Association for Healthcare Quality. (2019-03-07)
Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace
Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace, according to a professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-03-04)
Psychiatry: Case notes indicate impending seclusion
Using notes made by the attending healthcare professionals about psychiatric patients enables impending coercive measures to be predicted in advance -- potentially even through automated text analysis. (2019-02-28)
Infectious diseases could be diagnosed with smartphones in sub-Saharan Africa
A new Imperial-led review has outlined how health workers could use existing phones to predict and curb the spread of infectious diseases. (2019-02-27)
Surgery for uncomplicated appendicitis in adults is effective and safe
There has been a growing debate over whether uncomplicated appendicitis should be treated with antibiotics rather than surgery. (2019-02-25)
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