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Current Hearing loss News and Events

Current Hearing loss News and Events, Hearing loss News Articles.
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Alport syndrome: Research highlights link between genotype and treatment effectiveness
A large-scale analysis of the clinical characteristics of Alport syndrome in Japanese patients has revealed for the first time in the world that the effectiveness of existing treatment with ACE inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers (RAS inhibitors) varies depending on the type of mutation in the syndrome's causal gene (COL4A5). (2020-08-07)
Neuroendocrine markers of grief
Researchers have examined what's currently known about the neuroendocrine effects of grief and whether biological factors can predict complicated or prolonged grief after the death of a loved one. (2020-08-05)
Online 'booster' improves attitudes toward hearing health among farm youths
Researchers at the University of Michigan are interested in changing the behavior of some 2 million farm youths affected by hazardous noise exposure and hearing loss in the United States. (2020-08-05)
Pandemic drives telehealth boom, but older adults can't connect
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a significant increase in video visits between patients and their doctors, but for many older adults, the shift has cut them off from care, rather than connecting them. (2020-08-03)
Hearing loss linked to neurocognitive deficits in childhood cancer survivors
Research shows that severe hearing loss in childhood cancer survivors is associated with neurocognitive deficits independent of type of therapy. (2020-07-30)
The Lancet: 40% of dementia cases could be prevented or delayed by targeting 12 risk factors throughout life
Modifying 12 risk factors over the lifecourse could delay or prevent 40% of dementia cases, according to an update to The Lancet Commission on dementia prevention, intervention, and care, which is being presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC 2020). (2020-07-30)
Forty percent of dementia cases could be prevented or delayed by targeting 12 risk factors throughout life
Forty percent of dementia cases could be prevented or delayed by targeting 12 risk factors throughout life, experts say. (2020-07-30)
Massive seagrass die-off leads to widespread erosion in a California estuary
The large-scale loss of eelgrass in a major California estuary -- Morro Bay -- may be causing widespread erosion. (2020-07-27)
The genetic basis of bats' superpowers revealed
First six reference-quality bat genomes released and analysed (2020-07-23)
Climate shift, forest loss and fires -- Scientists explain how Amazon forest is trapped in a vicious circle
A new study, published in Global Change Biology, showed how the fire expansion is attributed to climate regime shift and forest loss. (2020-07-22)
Mapping the brain's sensory gatekeeper
Researchers from MIT and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have mapped the thalamic reticular nucleus in unprecedented detail, revealing that the region contains two distinct subnetworks of neurons with different functions. (2020-07-22)
Wireless, optical cochlear implant uses LED lights to restore hearing in rodents
Scientists have created an optical cochlear implant based on LED lights that can safely and partially restore the sensation of hearing in deaf rats and gerbils. (2020-07-22)
Loyola researchers identify common characteristics of rare pediatric brain tumors
In a new study, researchers at Loyola University Medical Center and Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine found that pediatric acoustic neuroma patients had similar symptoms to those of adult patients; however, tumor size was typically larger in the pediatric patients at the time of diagnosis, symptoms of mass effect (secondary effects caused by the tumor) were more common, and the pediatric patients had a higher rate of tumor regrowth. (2020-07-22)
Older adults who can really smell the roses may face lower likelihood of dementia
Seniors who can identify smells like roses, turpentine, paint-thinner and lemons, and have retained their senses of hearing, vision and touch, may have half the risk of developing dementia as their peers with marked sensory decline. (2020-07-20)
Hair cell loss causes age-related hearing loss
Age-related hearing loss has more to do with the death of hair cells than the cellular battery powering them wearing out, according to new research in JNeurosci. (2020-07-20)
Study uncovers hair cell loss as underlying cause of age-related hearing loss
In a study of human ear tissues, scientists have demonstrated that age-related hearing loss is mainly caused by damage to hair cells. (2020-07-20)
Gum disease may raise risk of some cancers
People who have periodontal (gum) disease may have a higher risk of developing some forms of cancer, suggests a letter published in the journal Gut detailing a prospective study. (2020-07-20)
Glaucoma study findings emphasise need for regular eye checks
People with early-stage glaucoma see the contrast of visible objects in a very similar way to people without the condition, a new study has shown. (2020-07-17)
Blood vessels communicate with sensory neurons to decide their fate
The researchers, using real-time videos, have discovered that both the neurons and the cells of blood vessels emit dynamic protrusions to be able to 'talk' to each other. (2020-07-16)
New, remote weight-loss method helped slash pounds
A new Northwestern Medicine remote weight-loss program, called Opt-IN, provides maximum weight loss for the lowest cost and with much less hassle than the gold-standard National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), the most successful behavioral non-drug treatment currently available. (2020-07-14)
Study: RNA repair shows promise in reversing mutations underlying a neurological disorder
Scientists successfully edited RNA in a living animal in such a way that the repaired RNA then corrected a mutation in a protein that gives rise to a debilitating neurological disorder in people known as Rett syndrome. (2020-07-14)
COVID-19 tip sheet: Story ideas from Johns Hopkins
For information from Johns Hopkins Medicine about the coronavirus pandemic, visit hopkinsmedicine.org/coronavirus. (2020-07-14)
New research shows that laser spectral linewidth is classical-physics phenomenon
New ground-breaking research from the University of Surrey could change the way scientists understand and describe lasers - establishing a new relationship between classical and quantum physics. (2020-07-10)
Hearing and visual impairments linked to elevated dementia risk
Older adults with both hearing and visual impairments--or dual sensory impairment--had a significantly higher risk for dementia in a recent study published in Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring. (2020-07-08)
UBC research shows hearing persists at end of life
Hearing is widely thought to be the last sense to go in the dying process. (2020-07-08)
New study sparks fresh call for seagrass preservation
An increase in carbon dioxide emissions equivalent to 5 million cars a year has been caused by the loss of seagrass meadows around the Australian coastline since the 1950s. (2020-07-07)
Our animal inheritance: Humans perk up their ears, too, when they hear interesting sounds
Many animals move their ears to better focus their attention on a novel sound. (2020-07-07)
Common inherited genetic variant identified as frequent cause of deafness in adults
A common inherited genetic variant is a frequent cause of deafness in adults, meaning that many thousands of people are potentially at risk, reveals research published online in the Journal of Medical Genetics. (2020-07-06)
A simpler way to make sensory hearing cells
Scientists from the USC Stem Cell laboratories of Neil Segil and Justin Ichida are whispering the secrets of a simpler way to generate the sensory cells of the inner ear. (2020-07-01)
Study confirms ultra music festival likely stressful to fish
A new study published in the Journal Environmental Pollution by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science found that the Ultra Music Festival was likely stressful to toadfish. (2020-07-01)
New study shows how tests of hearing can reveal HIV's effects on the brain
Findings from a new study published in Clinical Neurophysiology, involving a collaborative effort between Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University, are shedding further light on how the brain's auditory system may provide a window into how the brain is affected by HIV. (2020-06-29)
Dieting success: Top performers provide more positive support than peers
The weight loss industry in the United States is vast and generates about $20 billion each year from over 100 million dieters. (2020-06-23)
US beekeepers reported lower winter losses but abnormally high summer losses
2019-2020 was an odd year for US Beekeepers, and scientists are starting to piece together the puzzle behind the cyclical nature of honey bee colony survival. (2020-06-22)
Forest loss escalates biodiversity change
New international research reveals the far-reaching impacts of forest cover loss on global biodiversity. (2020-06-18)
New nanoparticle drug combination for atherosclerosis
Physicochemical cargo-switching nanoparticles (CSNP) designed by KAIST can help significantly reduce cholesterol and macrophage foam cells in arteries, which are the two main triggers for atherosclerotic plaque and inflammation. (2020-06-17)
Children with developmental disabilities more likely to develop asthma
Children with developmental disabilities or delay are more at risk of developing asthma, according to a new study published in JAMA Network Open led by public health researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) as part of the Center for Pediatric Population Health. (2020-06-16)
Kidneys deteriorate with age, regardless of health
Why we age remains an unanswered question. But recently, researchers at UiT, along with colleagues in Berlin and Reykjavik, have discovered that kidneys age, regardless if people are sick or not. (2020-06-09)
Creating hairy human skin: Not as easy as you think
For the first time, growing human skin cell capable of growing hair embedded with fat and nerve cells is a reality. (2020-06-05)
Use loss of taste and smell as key screening tool for COVID-19, researchers urge
King's College London researchers have called for the immediate use of additional COVID-19 symptoms to detect new cases, reduce infections and save lives. (2020-06-04)
Obstructive sleep apnoea: Mandibular advancement device helps against daytime sleepiness
Obstructive sleep apnoea: mandibular advancement device helps against daytime sleepiness In obstructive sleep apnoea, wearing a plastic splint in the mouth at night to keep the airways open mechanically is about as effective as positive airway pressure therapy with a sleep mask. (2020-06-03)
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