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Current Hearing loss News and Events

Current Hearing loss News and Events, Hearing loss News Articles.
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Ear's inner secrets revealed with new technology
What does it actually look like deep inside our ears? (2020-04-09)
Ménière's disease: New clinical practice guideline
The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation published the Clinical Practice Guideline: Ménière's Disease today in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. (2020-04-08)
New research suggests in-womb gene correction
New research led by hearing scientists at Oregon Health & Science University suggests an avenue to treat and prevent intractable genetic disorders before birth. (2020-04-05)
Surprising hearing talents in cormorants
The great cormorant has more sensitive hearing under water than in air. (2020-04-01)
Most diets lead to weight loss and lower blood pressure, but effects largely disappear after a year
Reasonably good evidence suggests that most diets result in similar modest weight loss and improvements in cardiovascular risk factors over a period of six months, compared with a usual diet, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-04-01)
Bariatric surgery before diabetes develops leads to greater weight loss
Obese patients may lose more weight if they undergo bariatric surgery before they develop diabetes, suggests a study accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting. (2020-03-30)
High-resolution PET/CT assesses brain stem function in patients with hearing impairment
Novel, fully digital, high-resolution positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging of small brain stem nuclei can provide clinicians with valuable information concerning the auditory pathway in patients with hearing impairment, according to a new study published in the March issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-03-25)
Loss of protein disturbs intestinal homeostasis and can drive cancer
An international team of researchers from the University of Zurich, the University Hospital Zurich, Heidelberg and Glasgow has identified a novel function for the cell death regulating protein MCL1: It is essential in protecting the intestine against cancer development -- independent of bacterial-driven inflammation. (2020-03-18)
Physicists propose new filter for blocking high-pitched sounds
Need to reduce high-pitched noises? Science may have an answer. (2020-03-17)
New research first to relate Antarctic sea ice melt to weather change in tropics
While there is a growing body of research showing how the loss of Arctic sea ice affects other parts of the planet, a new study is the first to also consider the long-range effect of Antarctic sea ice melt. (2020-03-16)
Sound can directly affect balance and lead to risk of falling
Mount Sinai research highlights the need for more hearing checks among groups at high risk for falls. (2020-03-12)
Estimating adults at high risk for vision loss, evaluating care use
The estimated number of US adults at high risk for vision loss increased from 2002 to 2017 in this observational study based on national survey data. (2020-03-12)
University of Iowa scientists pinpoint a brain region that stops breathing in pediatric epilepsy
University of Iowa neuroscientists have identified a specific area of the brain involved in the loss of breathing that occurs during a seizure. (2020-03-12)
Study: Layoffs lead to higher rates of violent offenses and property crimes
Displaced workers experienced a 20% increase in criminal charges the year after being laid off (2020-03-11)
Smaller tropical forest fragments vanish faster than larger forest blocks
In one of the first studies to explicitly account for fragmentation in tropical forests, researchers report that smaller fragments of old-growth forests and protected areas experienced greater losses than larger fragments, between 2001 and 2018. (2020-03-11)
Clotting problem
New research into why some people's blood doesn't clot well identified defects in the platelet-making process, where mutant cells aren't behaving properly. (2020-03-09)
University of Surrey's 'SMART' study awarded £426k to make multilingual content accessible
The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), part of UK Research and Innovation, has awarded £426,000 to the University of Surrey to undertake a ground-breaking investigation into interlingual live subtitling via respeaking. (2020-03-09)
Veterinarians: Dogs, too, can experience hearing loss
Just like humans, dogs are sometimes born with impaired hearing or experience hearing loss as a result of disease, inflammation, aging or exposure to noise. (2020-03-05)
UCF study: Sea level rise impacts to Canaveral sea turtle nests will be substantial
The study examined loggerhead and green sea turtle nests to predict beach habitat loss at four national seashores by the year 2100. (2020-03-04)
NIH-funded research team updates online tool for extremely preterm infant outcomes
A research team funded by the National Institutes of Health has updated an online tool to provide information for clinicians and parents on outcomes for extremely preterm infants. (2020-03-02)
Directed species loss from species-rich forests strongly decreases productivity
At high species richness, directed loss, but not random loss, of tree species strongly decreases forest productivity. (2020-03-02)
App detecting jaundice may prevent deaths in newborns
A smartphone app that allows users to check for jaundice in newborn babies simply by taking a picture of the eye may be an effective, low-cost way to screen for the condition, according to a pilot study led by UCL and UCLH. (2020-03-02)
Clinical factors during pregnancy related to congenital cytomegalovirus infection
A group led by researchers from Kobe University has illuminated clinical factors that are related to the occurrence of congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in newborns. (2020-02-28)
Unintended pregnancy rates higher among women with disabilities, study says
Pregnancies among women with disabilities are 42% more likely to be unintended than pregnancies among women without disabilities, says a new report published in the journal Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health. (2020-02-28)
Gene loss more important in animal kingdom evolution than previously thought
Scientists have shown that some key points of animal evolution -- like the ones leading to humans or insects -- were associated with a large loss of genes in the genome. (2020-02-27)
New research uncovers potential pathway to slowing Alzheimer's
Overcoming the loss of a process in the brain called ''RNA editing'' may slow the progress of Alzheimer's disease and other synaptic disorders, a study shows. (2020-02-27)
Hearing aids may delay cognitive decline, research finds
Wearing hearing aids may delay cognitive decline in older adults and improve brain function, according to promising new research. (2020-02-26)
Babies from bilingual homes switch attention faster
Babies born into bilingual homes change the focus of their attention more quickly and more frequently than babies in homes where only one language is spoken, according to new research published in the journal Royal Society Open Science. (2020-02-25)
Laser writing enables practical flat optics and data storage in glass
Femtosecond laser machining has emerged as an attractive technology enabling appications ranging from eye surgery to direct writing in the bulk of transparent materials. (2020-02-19)
Insufficient evidence backing herbal medicines for weight loss
Researchers from the University of Sydney have conducted the first global review of herbal medicines for weight loss in 19 years, finding insufficient evidence to recommend any current treatments. (2020-02-17)
Memory games: Eating well to remember
A healthy diet is essential to living well, but should we change what we eat as we age? (2020-02-17)
The demise of tropical snakes, an 'invisible' outcome of biodiversity loss
That tropical amphibian populations have been crippled by the chytrid fungus is well-known, but a new study linking this loss to an 'invisible' decline of tropical snake communities suggests that the permeating impacts of the biodiversity crisis are not as apparent. (2020-02-13)
Biodiversity offsetting is contentious -- here's an alternative
A new approach to compensate for the impact of development may be an effective alternative to biodiversity offsetting -- and help nations achieve international biodiversity targets. (2020-02-12)
Bush-crickets' ears unlock the science to developing revolutionary hearing sensors
Scientists could revolutionise auditory devices used for monitoring and surveillance purposes after new research into bush-crickets' ear canals found that they have evolved to work in the same way as mammals' ears to amplify sound and modulate sound pressure. (2020-02-11)
Mindfulness helps obese children lose weight
Mindfulness-based therapy may help reduce stress, appetite and body weight in children with obesity and anxiety, according to a study published in Endocrine Connections. (2020-02-07)
Regioselective functionalization of perylenes reduces voltage loss in organic solar cells
Researchers at Institute for Molecular Science and Shizuoka University in Japan report that regioselective bay-functionalization of perylene derivatives and the use of the synthesized perylene diimide (PDI) as an acceptor material reduces the open-circuit voltage loss in organic solar cells (OSCs). (2020-02-05)
Drexel study: Physical activity is good for your appetite, too
Researchers from the Center for Weight, Eating and Lifestyle Science (WELL Center) at Drexel University found exercise to be a protective factor in a study where participants in a weight loss program, who were following a reduced-calorie diet, engaged in exercise in their real-world environments. (2020-02-03)
Blind as a bat? The genetic basis of echolocation in bats and whales
Scientists reveal that similar genetic mutations led to the establishment of echolocation in both bats and whales. (2020-01-29)
Mouse brain region processes sound and motion at the same time
New insight on how information relating to sound and movement is processed in the brain has been published today in the open-access journal eLife. (2020-01-28)
Biomarkers of brain function may lead to clinical tests for hidden hearing loss
A pair of biomarkers of brain function -- one that represents 'listening effort,' and another that measures ability to process rapid changes in frequencies -- may help to explain why a person with normal hearing may struggle to follow conversations in noisy environments, according to a new study led by Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers. (2020-01-28)
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