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Current Hearing loss News and Events

Current Hearing loss News and Events, Hearing loss News Articles.
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Global biodiversity crisis is a large-scale reorganization, with greatest loss in tropical oceans
Local biodiversity of species -- the scale on which humans feel contributions from biodiversity -- is being rapidly reorganized, according to a new global analysis of biodiversity data from more than 200 studies, together representing all major biomes. (2019-10-17)
Reducing open-circuit voltage loss in organic solar cells
Researchers at Institute for Molecular Science in Japan report that organic solar cells (OSCs) with high mobility and highly crystalline donor (D) and acceptor (A) materials were able to reduce an open-circuit voltage (VOC) loss. (2019-10-16)
EPFL is developing next-generation soft hearing implants
Working with clinicians from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School, a team of EPFL researchers has developed a conformable electrode implant that will allow people with a dysfunctional inner ear to hear again. (2019-10-16)
Deaf infants' gaze behavior more advanced than that of hearing infants
Deaf infants who have been exposed to American Sign Language are better at following an adult's gaze than their hearing peers, supporting the idea that social-cognitive development is sensitive to different kinds of life experiences. (2019-10-16)
Weight-loss surgery cuts risk of birth defects
Children born to women who underwent gastric bypass surgery before becoming pregnant had a lower risk of major birth defects than children born to women who had severe obesity at the start of their pregnancy. (2019-10-15)
Study 'cures' oldest case of deafness in human evolution
An international team of researchers including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, has published a new study examining a 430,000-year-old cranium of a human ancestor that was previously described as deaf, representing the oldest case of deafness in human prehistory. (2019-10-15)
Deaf infants more attuned to parent's visual cues
A University of Washington-led study finds that Deaf infants exposed to American Sign Language are especially tuned to a parent's eye gaze, itself a social connection between parent and child that is linked to early learning. (2019-10-15)
Barriers to access to hearing aids for children
Researchers looked at demographic, socioeconomic and clinical factors that were associated with timely access to hearing aids for children. (2019-10-10)
How bats relocate in response to tree loss
Identifying how groups of animals select where to live is important for understanding social dynamics and for management and conservation. (2019-10-09)
Maintaining weight loss beneficial for people with Type 2 diabetes
People with Type 2 diabetes who regained weight forfeited the benefits of an intensive weight loss program that reduced their heart disease and stroke risk factors. (2019-10-09)
Study: Losing weight -- and keeping it off -- linked to cardiometabolic benefits
People who lose weight and keep it off can stabilize or even improve their cardiometabolic risk factors compared to people who regain weight, finds a new study led by researchers from the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts. (2019-10-09)
Evaluating value of senses
What senses (sight, hearing, touch, smell, taste, balance, temperature and pain) are most valued by the general public? (2019-10-03)
Heart failure and the obesity paradox
While obesity significantly increases your chances of developing heart failure, for those with established heart failure it may confer a survival benefit compared with normal weight or underweight individuals. (2019-10-03)
Mild-to-moderate hearing loss in children leads to changes in how brain processes sound
Deafness in early childhood is known to lead to lasting changes in how sounds are processed in the brain, but new research published today in eLife shows that even mild-to-moderate levels of hearing loss in young children can lead to similar changes. (2019-10-01)
Treatment with long term, low dose antibiotic could help people born with chronic lung condition
Taking a low dose of the antibiotic azithromycin for 6 months reduces symptoms for patients with the chronic lung condition primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. (2019-10-01)
Type 2 diabetes remission possible with 'achievable' weight loss, say researchers
People who achieve weight loss of 10% or more in the first five years following diagnosis with type 2 diabetes have the greatest chance of seeing their disease go into remission, according to a study led by the University of Cambridge. (2019-09-30)
New genes identified in hearing loss, providing treatment hope
A new study published today in The American Journal of Human Genetics has identified 44 genes linked to age-related hearing loss giving a much clearer understanding of how the condition develops and potential treatments. (2019-09-26)
Compute at the speed of light
A new way to achieve integrated photonics--a new device has been developed at the University of Delaware that could have applications in imaging, sensing and quantum information processing, such as on-chip transformation optics, mathematical operations and spectrometers. (2019-09-26)
Habitat connectivity increases plant diversity over decades
Restoring habitat connectivity may be a powerful tool in restoring lost plant biodiversity in fragmented ecosystems, a new study suggests. (2019-09-26)
Outer hair cells regulate ear's sensitivity to sound
The ear's tiny outer hair cells adjust the sensitivity of neighboring inner hair cells to sound levels rather than acting like an amplifier, suggests a new study published today in eLife. (2019-09-24)
Bats use private and social information as they hunt
As some of the most savvy and sophisticated predators out there, bats eavesdrop on their prey and even on other bats to collect a wide variety of information as they hunt. (2019-09-24)
Why is the brain disturbed by harsh sounds?
Neuroscientists (UNIGE) analysed how people react when they listen to a range of different sounds, the aim being to establish the extent to which repetitive sound frequencies are considered unpleasant. (2019-09-20)
Lab develops novel approach to study sound recognition in acoustically orienting animals
A new study by Dr. Norman Lee, in collaboration with St. (2019-09-20)
Nearly three billion fewer birds in North America since 1970
North America has lost nearly three billion birds since 1970, according to a new report, which also details widespread population declines among hundreds of North American bird species, including those once considered abundant. (2019-09-19)
Scientists discover new breakthrough in cancer hair loss treatment
Researchers based at The University of Manchester have discovered a new strategy for how to protect hair follicles from chemotherapy, which could lead to new treatments that prevent chemotherapy-induced hair loss -- arguably one of the most psychologically distressing side effects of modern cancer therapy. (2019-09-12)
Calcium channel blockers may be effective in treating memory loss in Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia but the changes in brain cell function underlying memory loss remains poorly understood. (2019-09-11)
ENT researchers showcase studies at Otolaryngology's Annual Meeting
The most current research on head and neck cancer, cochlear implants, techniques in tonsillectomies, opioid prescribing patterns, residency matching, and other topics related to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery will be presented in New Orleans, LA, September 15-18, 2019, during the 2019 Annual Meeting & OTO Experience of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. (2019-09-09)
Speech impairment in five-year-old international adoptees with cleft palate
In a group of internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate, speech at age five is impaired compared to a corresponding group of children born in Sweden, a study shows. (2019-09-06)
Sound deprivation in one ear leads to speech recognition difficulties
Chronic conductive hearing loss, which can result from middle-ear infections, has been linked to speech recognition deficits, according to the results of a new study of 240 patients, led by scientists at Massachusetts Eye and Ear. (2019-09-06)
Study links hearing aids to lower risk of dementia, depression and falls
Older adults who get a hearing aid for a newly diagnosed hearing loss have a lower risk of being diagnosed with dementia, depression or anxiety for the first time over the next three years, and a lower risk of suffering fall-related injuries, than those who leave their hearing loss uncorrected, a new study finds. (2019-09-05)
Hearing aids may help reduce risks of dementia, depression, and falls
Use of hearing aids was linked with lower risks of being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, dementia, depression, anxiety, and injurious falls in an analysis of medical information on 114,862 older adults with hearing loss. (2019-09-05)
Weight change and bone health in older adults with obesity
Weight loss in older adults is accompanied by loss in bone mineral density (BMD) and an increased risk of bone fracture. (2019-09-05)
FSU researchers find furry friends ease depression, loneliness after spousal loss
As Healthy Aging Month is underway this September, Florida State University researchers have found the companionship of a pet after the loss of a spouse can help reduce feelings of depression and loneliness in older adults. (2019-09-05)
Native birds in South-eastern Australia worst affected by habitat
New research has found that habitat loss is a major concern for hundreds of Australian bird species, and south-eastern Australia has been the worst affected. (2019-09-02)
Poor diet can lead to blindness
An extreme case of 'fussy' or 'picky' eating caused a young patient's blindness, according to a new case report published today [2 Sep 2019] in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2019-09-02)
Victorian child hearing-loss databank to go global
A unique databank that profiles children with hearing loss will help researchers globally understand why some children adapt and thrive, while others struggle. (2019-08-30)
Mechanism of epilepsy causing membrane protein is discovered
The team lead by Dr. Lim Hyun-Ho of Korea Brain Research Institute published its paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (2019-08-29)
Tracing the evolution of vision
The function of the visual photopigment rhodopsin and its action in the retina to facilitate vision is well understood. (2019-08-22)
Making it count
The study shows reaching a goal expressed in round numbers results in higher levels of customer satisfaction. (2019-08-21)
Mississippi River diversions: Driving land gain or land loss?
River diversions have not created or maintained land, but resulted in more land loss, according to a new paper in the peer-reviewed science journal Restoration Ecology. (2019-08-19)
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