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Current Hearing News and Events

Current Hearing News and Events, Hearing News Articles.
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Ear's inner secrets revealed with new technology
What does it actually look like deep inside our ears? (2020-04-09)
Ménière's disease: New clinical practice guideline
The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation published the Clinical Practice Guideline: Ménière's Disease today in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. (2020-04-08)
New research suggests in-womb gene correction
New research led by hearing scientists at Oregon Health & Science University suggests an avenue to treat and prevent intractable genetic disorders before birth. (2020-04-05)
Surprising hearing talents in cormorants
The great cormorant has more sensitive hearing under water than in air. (2020-04-01)
High-resolution PET/CT assesses brain stem function in patients with hearing impairment
Novel, fully digital, high-resolution positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging of small brain stem nuclei can provide clinicians with valuable information concerning the auditory pathway in patients with hearing impairment, according to a new study published in the March issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-03-25)
Physicists propose new filter for blocking high-pitched sounds
Need to reduce high-pitched noises? Science may have an answer. (2020-03-17)
Sound can directly affect balance and lead to risk of falling
Mount Sinai research highlights the need for more hearing checks among groups at high risk for falls. (2020-03-12)
University of Surrey's 'SMART' study awarded £426k to make multilingual content accessible
The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), part of UK Research and Innovation, has awarded £426,000 to the University of Surrey to undertake a ground-breaking investigation into interlingual live subtitling via respeaking. (2020-03-09)
Veterinarians: Dogs, too, can experience hearing loss
Just like humans, dogs are sometimes born with impaired hearing or experience hearing loss as a result of disease, inflammation, aging or exposure to noise. (2020-03-05)
Clinical factors during pregnancy related to congenital cytomegalovirus infection
A group led by researchers from Kobe University has illuminated clinical factors that are related to the occurrence of congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in newborns. (2020-02-28)
Unintended pregnancy rates higher among women with disabilities, study says
Pregnancies among women with disabilities are 42% more likely to be unintended than pregnancies among women without disabilities, says a new report published in the journal Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health. (2020-02-28)
Hearing aids may delay cognitive decline, research finds
Wearing hearing aids may delay cognitive decline in older adults and improve brain function, according to promising new research. (2020-02-26)
Babies from bilingual homes switch attention faster
Babies born into bilingual homes change the focus of their attention more quickly and more frequently than babies in homes where only one language is spoken, according to new research published in the journal Royal Society Open Science. (2020-02-25)
Bush-crickets' ears unlock the science to developing revolutionary hearing sensors
Scientists could revolutionise auditory devices used for monitoring and surveillance purposes after new research into bush-crickets' ear canals found that they have evolved to work in the same way as mammals' ears to amplify sound and modulate sound pressure. (2020-02-11)
Blind as a bat? The genetic basis of echolocation in bats and whales
Scientists reveal that similar genetic mutations led to the establishment of echolocation in both bats and whales. (2020-01-29)
Mouse brain region processes sound and motion at the same time
New insight on how information relating to sound and movement is processed in the brain has been published today in the open-access journal eLife. (2020-01-28)
Biomarkers of brain function may lead to clinical tests for hidden hearing loss
A pair of biomarkers of brain function -- one that represents 'listening effort,' and another that measures ability to process rapid changes in frequencies -- may help to explain why a person with normal hearing may struggle to follow conversations in noisy environments, according to a new study led by Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers. (2020-01-28)
Concordian examines the link between cognition and hearing or vision loss
Concordia researcher Natalie Phillips and her colleagues found that poor hearing especially was linked to declines in memory and executive function in otherwise relatively healthy, autonomous, community-dwelling older adults. (2020-01-28)
Oregon researchers test hearing by looking at dilation of people's eyes
University of Oregon neuroscientists have shown that a person's hearing can be assessed by measuring dilation of the pupils in eyes, a method that is as sensitive as traditional methods of testing hearing. (2020-01-08)
Study: Hearing develops in tandem with form and function
New research reveals a key insight into the development of hair bundles, the intricately complex assemblies in the inner ear responsible for hearing. (2020-01-02)
Millions with swallowing problems could be helped through new wearable device
A wearable monitoring device to make treatments easier and more affordable for the millions of people with swallowing disorders is about to be released into the market. (2019-12-17)
Poor sight causes people to overstep the mark
People with vision impairment are more cautious when stepping over obstacles when walking - but increase their risk of falls, according to a new study published in the journal Scientific Reports. (2019-12-17)
Researchers reconstruct spoken words as processed in nonhuman primate brains
Using a brain-computer interface, a team of researchers has reconstructed English words from the brain activity of rhesus macaques that listened as the words were spoken. (2019-12-13)
University of Miami team investigates why candidates for cochlear implants rarely get them
University of Miami researchers published a study in JAMA Oncology-Head and Neck Surgery that examines why adult candidates for cochlear implants rarely get them. (2019-12-12)
New early Cretaceous mammal fossils bridge a transitional gap in ear's evolution
Fossils of a previously unknown species of Early Cretaceous mammal have caught in the act the final steps by which mammals' multi-boned middle ears evolved, according to a new study. (2019-12-05)
New cretaceous mammal provides evidence for separation of hearing and chewing modules
A joint research team led by MAO Fangyuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and MENG Jin from the American Museum of Natural History reported a new symmetrodont, Origolestes lii, a stem therian mammal from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota, in China's Liaoning Province. (2019-12-05)
Reprogramming inner ear to regrow hair cells promising target for hearing loss treatments
Mass. Eye and Ear scientists report the identification of a new pathway linked to cell division in the ear. (2019-12-04)
A week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing in adult mice
New research reveals how a week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing sensitivity in adult mice long after the optimal window for auditory learning has passed. (2019-12-04)
Joint statement from six journals highlights concerns about EPA proposed rule
In a joint journal statement in this issue, the editors-in-chief of six scientific journals (Science, Nature, Cell, PNAS, PLOS and The Lancet) highlight their concerns regarding the 2018 'Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science' rule proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which has recently returned to the spotlight following a hearing on evidence in policy-making. (2019-11-26)
Estimating how self-reported hearing trouble varied among older adults
Researchers used nationally representative survey data from adults 60 or older to estimate how self-reported hearing trouble varied across sociodemographic characteristics and by actual hearing loss. (2019-11-21)
Musicians at serious risk of tinnitus, researchers show
People working in the music industry are nearly twice as likely to develop tinnitus as people working in quieter occupations, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Manchester. (2019-11-20)
Hear this: Healthful diet tied to lower risk of hearing loss
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have found that eating a healthy diet may reduce the risk of acquired hearing loss. (2019-11-18)
Link between hearing and cognition begins earlier than once thought
A new study finds that cognitive impairment begins in the earliest stages of age-related hearing loss -- when hearing is still considered normal. (2019-11-14)
Is association between hearing loss, impaired cognition present earlier
Researchers in this observational study looked at whether the association between hearing loss and cognitive impairment is present at earlier levels of hearing loss than previously believed. (2019-11-14)
Good noise, bad noise: White noise improves hearing
Noise is not the same as noise -- and even a quiet environment does not have the same effect as white noise. (2019-11-12)
An NJIT engineer proposes a new model for the way humans localize sounds
One of the enduring puzzles of hearing loss is the decline in a person's ability to determine where a sound originates, a key survival faculty that allows animals to pinpoint the location of danger, prey and group members. (2019-11-05)
Medical alarms may be inaudible to hospital staff
Thousands of alarms are generated each day in any given hospital. (2019-10-28)
For better research results, let mice be mice
Animal models can serve as gateways for understanding many human communication disorders, but a new study from the University at Buffalo suggests that the established practice of socially isolating mice for such purposes might actually make them poor research models for humans, and a simple shift to a more realistic social environment could greatly improve the utility of the future studies. (2019-10-24)
Zebrafish discovery throws new light on human hearing disorders
A study of the genetic make-up of zebrafish has provided brand new insights into the cause of congenital hearing disorders in humans. (2019-10-23)
White bellbirds in Amazon shatter record for loudest bird call ever measured
Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on Oct. 21 have captured the loudest bird calls yet documented. (2019-10-21)
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