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Current Hearing News and Events

Current Hearing News and Events, Hearing News Articles.
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Speech impairment in five-year-old international adoptees with cleft palate
In a group of internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate, speech at age five is impaired compared to a corresponding group of children born in Sweden, a study shows. (2019-09-06)
Sound deprivation in one ear leads to speech recognition difficulties
Chronic conductive hearing loss, which can result from middle-ear infections, has been linked to speech recognition deficits, according to the results of a new study of 240 patients, led by scientists at Massachusetts Eye and Ear. (2019-09-06)
Study links hearing aids to lower risk of dementia, depression and falls
Older adults who get a hearing aid for a newly diagnosed hearing loss have a lower risk of being diagnosed with dementia, depression or anxiety for the first time over the next three years, and a lower risk of suffering fall-related injuries, than those who leave their hearing loss uncorrected, a new study finds. (2019-09-05)
Hearing aids may help reduce risks of dementia, depression, and falls
Use of hearing aids was linked with lower risks of being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, dementia, depression, anxiety, and injurious falls in an analysis of medical information on 114,862 older adults with hearing loss. (2019-09-05)
Victorian child hearing-loss databank to go global
A unique databank that profiles children with hearing loss will help researchers globally understand why some children adapt and thrive, while others struggle. (2019-08-30)
Tracing the evolution of vision
The function of the visual photopigment rhodopsin and its action in the retina to facilitate vision is well understood. (2019-08-22)
Sensory impairment and health expectancy in older adults
Older adults aged 60 years and above with vision and hearing impairments may enjoy fewer years of life as well as healthy life compared to those with no impairments. (2019-08-15)
Researchers find proteins that might restore damaged sound-detecting cells in the ear
Using genetic tools in mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have identified a pair of proteins that precisely control when sound-detecting cells, known as hair cells, are born in the mammalian inner ear. (2019-08-05)
Paradoxical outcomes for Zika-exposed tots
Forty-five percent of Zika-exposed infants who had abnormalities at birth had normal test results in the second or third year of life. (2019-08-02)
Sudden hearing loss: Update to guideline to improve implementation and awareness
The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation published the Clinical Practice Guideline: Sudden Hearing Loss (Update) today in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. (2019-08-01)
Barn owls may hold key to navigation and location
The way barn owl brains use sound to locate prey may be a template for electronic directional navigation devices, according to a team of Penn State engineers who are recreating owl brain circuitry in electronics. (2019-08-01)
Hearing loss, dementia risk in population of Taiwan
A population-based study using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan suggests hearing loss is associated with risk of dementia. (2019-07-31)
Parents' mental illness increases suicide risk in adults with tinnitus, hyperacusis
A study is the first to examine the relationship between parental mental illness like anxiety and depression in childhood and the risk of suicide and self-harm in adults who suffer from tinnitus, noise or ringing in the ears, and hyperacusis, extreme sensitivity to noise. (2019-07-31)
New study explains a secret to more efficient learning
A new study could hold the key to learning languages, teaching children colors or even studying complex theories. (2019-07-24)
Hearing loss tied with mental, physical, and social ailments in older people
Hearing loss has a profound impact on older people, as it can lead to anxiety, restricted activity, and perhaps even cognitive decline and dementia. (2019-07-19)
Brown neuroscientists discover neuron type that acts as brain's metronome
By measuring the fast electrical spikes of individual neurons in the touch region of the brain, Brown University neuroscientists have discovered a new type of cell that keeps time so regularly that it may serve as the brain's long-hypothesized clock or metronome. (2019-07-18)
Wearing hearing aid may help protect brain in later life
A new study has concluded that people who wear a hearing aid for age-related hearing problems maintain better brain function over time than those who do not. (2019-07-15)
Saving Beethoven
An optimized version of the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system prevents hearing loss with no detectable off-target effects in so-called Beethoven mice, which carry a mutation that causes profound hearing loss in humans and mice alike. (2019-07-03)
Health checks from age 40 avoid 'black hole'
Seeing a health professional for a full health screening - even when you feel healthy -- from around age 40 enables people to make changes when problems first set in, experts say. (2019-06-30)
Music develops the spoken language of the hearing-impaired
Finnish researchers have compiled guidelines for international use for utilising music to support the development of spoken language. (2019-06-27)
Babies can learn link between language and ethnicity, study suggests
Eleven-month-old infants can learn to associate the language they hear with ethnicity, recent research from the University of British Columbia suggests. (2019-06-25)
Study: Eyes hold clues for treating severe autism more effectively
In a new study, researchers demonstrate that assessment tools capturing implicit signs of word knowledge among those with severe autism like eye movement can be more accurate than traditional assessments of vocabulary, pointing the way toward better inventions and spurring much needed new research. (2019-06-19)
Researchers identify potential modifier genes in patients with charcot-marie-tooth disease
Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited neurological disorder affecting peripheral motor and/or sensory nerves in humans. (2019-06-18)
Reducing brain inflammation could treat tinnitus and other hearing loss-related disorders
Inflammation in a sound-processing region of the brain mediates ringing in the ears in mice that have noise-induced hearing loss, according to a study publishing June 18, 2019, in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Shaowen Bao of the University of Arizona, and colleagues. (2019-06-18)
The power of a love song: Dopamine affects seasonal hearing in fish and facilitates mating
Scientists at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York and Brooklyn College have discovered seasonal changes in dopamine levels in the female plainfin midshipman fish's inner ear helps hearing sensitivity grow in the summer mating season, making her better able to hear the male's mating calls. (2019-06-13)
Drug to treat malaria could mitigate hereditary hearing loss
The ability to hear depends on proteins to reach the outer membrane of sensory cells in the inner ear. (2019-06-11)
Hearing through your fingers: Device that converts speech
A novel study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience provides the first evidence that a simple and inexpensive non-invasive speech-to-touch sensory substitution device has the potential to improve hearing in hearing-impaired cochlear implant patients, as well as individuals with normal hearing, to better discern speech in various situations like learning a second language or trying to deal with the 'cocktail party effect.' The device can provide immediate multisensory enhancement without any training. (2019-06-03)
All ears: Genetic bases of mammalian inner ear evolution
Mammals have also a remarkable capacity in their sense of hearing, from the high-frequency echolocation calls of bats to low frequency whale songs. (2019-05-28)
Does your health in middle age predict how healthy you'll be later in life?
Cognitive decline is the medical term for a decline in your abilities to think, remember, and make decisions. (2019-05-24)
'Implicit measures' better assess vocabulary for those with autism than standard tests
In a new study, researchers demonstrate that assessment tools capturing implicit signs of word knowledge among those with severe autism like eye movement can be more accurate than traditional assessments of vocabulary, pointing the way toward better inventions and spurring much needed new research. (2019-05-21)
Experimental brain-controlled hearing aid decodes, identifies who you want to hear
Our brains have a remarkable knack for picking out individual voices in a noisy environment, like a crowded coffee shop or a busy city street. (2019-05-15)
Hearing device separates simultaneous voices, amplifies the 'target' speaker
Picking out one voice from many at a crowded party is a challenge for assistive hearing devices. (2019-05-15)
Study: Treats might mask animal intelligence
Rewards are necessary for learning, but may actually mask true knowledge, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study with rodents and ferrets. (2019-05-14)
How much language are unborn children exposed to in the womb?
The different soundscapes of NICUs has recently attracted interest in how changes in what we hear in our earliest days might affect language development in the brain. (2019-05-14)
Dolphin ancestor's hearing was more like hoofed mammals than today's sea creatures
The CT scan revealed cochlear coiling with more turns than in animals with echolocation, indicating hearing more similar to the cloven-hoofed, terrestrial mammals dolphins came from than the sleek sea creatures they are today. (2019-05-14)
Locating a shooter from the first shot via cellphone
Militaries have worked hard to develop technologies that simultaneously protect soldiers' hearing and aid in battlefield communication. (2019-05-13)
Hearing loss weakens skills that young cancer survivors need to master reading
Researchers have identified factors that explain why severe hearing loss sets up pediatric brain tumor survivors for reading difficulties with far-reaching consequences. (2019-05-02)
Some children find it harder to understand what strangers are saying
New research by New York University Steinhardt Associate Professor Susannah Levi finds that children with poorer language skills are at a disadvantage when given tasks or being spoken to by strangers because they cannot, as easily as their peers, understand speech from people they do not know. (2019-04-26)
Study suggests overdiagnosis of schizophrenia
In a small study of patients referred to the Johns Hopkins Early Psychosis Intervention Clinic (EPIC), Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that about half the people referred to the clinic with a schizophrenia diagnosis didn't actually have schizophrenia. (2019-04-22)
Low use of hearing aids among older Hispanic/Latino adults in US
This study examined how common hearing aids were and the factors associated with their use among a group of nearly 1,900 adults (average age 60) of Hispanic/Latino backgrounds with hearing loss. (2019-04-18)
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