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Current Heart muscle News and Events

Current Heart muscle News and Events, Heart muscle News Articles.
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Gravity changes mass of muscles and bones, which was experimentally observed in space
An international collaboration led by scientists mainly at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) , Japan, has found that bone and muscle mass are regulated by the altered gravity. (2019-07-25)
How neuromuscular connections are maintained after nerve lesions
After nerve injury, the protein complex mTORC1 takes over an important function in skeletal muscle to maintain the neuromuscular junction, the synapse between the nerve and muscle fiber. (2019-07-25)
One or the other: Why strength training might come at the expense of endurance muscles
The neurotransmitter brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts in the muscle, so that during strength training endurance muscle fiber number is decreased. (2019-07-25)
Study reveals how HIV infection may contribute to metabolic conditions
A single viral factor released from HIV-infected cells may wreak havoc on the body and lead to the development of metabolic diseases. (2019-07-25)
New method enables more extensive preclinical testing of heart drugs and therapies
A new biomimetic culture system mimics the environment of a living organ through continuous electrical stimulation and oxygenation, maintaining viability and functionality of heart slices for six days. (2019-07-25)
Former NFL players may face higher risk of atrial fibrillation
Former National Football League (NFL) players were nearly 6 times more likely to have atrial fibrillation (AF), a type of irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke. (2019-07-24)
Box-sized sensor brings portable, noninvasive fluid monitoring to the bedside
Lina Colucci and colleagues have created a portable device that within 45 seconds accurately detected excess fluid buildup in the legs of seven participants with end-stage kidney failure. (2019-07-24)
Disrupting immune cell behavior may contribute to heart disease and failure, study shows
A new study, led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine, provides evidence that when circulating anti-inflammatory white blood cells known as monocytes fail to properly differentiate into macrophages -- the cells that engulf and digest cellular debris, bacteria and viruses -- certain forms of heart disease may result. (2019-07-24)
Frog in your throat? Stress might be to blame for vocal issues
A researcher from the University of Missouri has found that there is more to vocal issues than just feeling nervous and that stress-induced brain activations might be to blame. (2019-07-24)
Evolutionary gene loss may help explain why only humans are prone to heart attacks
University of California San Diego School of Medicine scientists say the loss of a single gene two to three million years ago in our ancestors may have resulted in a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease in all humans as a species, while also setting up a further risk for red meat-eating humans. (2019-07-22)
Stem cell therapy furthers research for infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome
A phase I clinical trial is the first research monitored by the Food and Drug Administration that demonstrates the potential of regenerative therapy for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) through collecting, processing and injecting an infant's own stem cells directly into the heart at the time of surgery. (2019-07-22)
Astronauts less likely to faint on Earth if they exercise in space; findings may help others with fainting issues
Up to two hours of endurance and resistance exercises daily during a long space flight mission, combined with IV fluid replacement after landing, helps astronauts prevent dizziness and fainting during normal activity when they return to Earth. (2019-07-19)
Space research helps patients on Earth with low blood pressure condition
With the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing approaching, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers are publishing heart-related space research that helps us to understand the problem of low blood pressure. (2019-07-19)
Red wine's resveratrol could help Mars explorers stay strong, says Harvard study
Mars is about 9 months from Earth with today's tech, NASA reckons. (2019-07-18)
UMN Medical School researchers explain muscle loss with menopause
New University of Minnesota Medical School research is the first to show that estrogen is essential to maintaining muscle stem cell health. (2019-07-18)
Study finds key metabolic changes in patients with chemotherapy-associated cardiotoxicity
Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center embarked on a study to investigate whether early changes in energy-related metabolites in the blood -- measured shortly after chemotherapy -- could be used to identify patients who developed heart toxicity at a later time. (2019-07-18)
Drinking red wine on the red planet
BIDMC researchers report that a daily moderate dose of resveratrol significantly preserved muscle function and mitigated muscle atrophy in an animal model mimicking Mars' partial gravity. (2019-07-18)
Diabetes increases the risk of heart failure more in women than men
Diabetes confers a greater excess risk of heart failure in women than men, according to new research in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes). (2019-07-18)
Proposed gene therapy for a heart arrhythmia, based on models made from patient cells
Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital report creating the first human tissue model of an inherited heart arrhythmia, replicating two patients' abnormal heart rhythms in a dish, and then suppressing the arrhythmia with gene therapy in a mouse model. (2019-07-17)
Stanford researchers identify possible drug target for deadly heart condition
A genetic mutation linked to dilated cardiomyopathy, a dangerous enlargement of the heart's main pumping chamber, activates a biological pathway normally turned off in healthy adult hearts, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2019-07-17)
Rare inherited enzyme disorder yields insight into fibrosis
St. Jude investigators have discovered an association between a deficiency in the enzyme neuraminidase 1 and the build-up of connective tissue in organs, suck as the muscle, kidney, liver, heart and lungs. (2019-07-17)
How invading fungus forces zombie ant's death grip
Infected by a parasitic fungus, carpenter ants lose free will and die after clamping their mandibles (jaws) onto a twig or leaf vein. (2019-07-17)
New cell discovered that can heal hearts
University of Calgary researchers are the first to discover a previously unidentified cell population in the pericardial fluid found inside the sac around the heart. (2019-07-16)
NIH scientists identify spasm in women with endometriosis-associated chronic pelvic pain
Pelvic pain associated with endometriosis often becomes chronic and can persist (or recur) following surgical and hormonal interventions. (2019-07-11)
Sheaths drive powerful new artificial muscles
Over the last 15 years, researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and their international colleagues have invented several types of strong, powerful artificial muscles using materials ranging from high-tech carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to ordinary fishing line. (2019-07-11)
Fiber-based artificial muscles get new and powerful twists
Three papers in this issue demonstrate new fiber-based designs within the world of artificial muscles, showing how these twisted and coiled designs can be controlled via heat, electricity and chemistry. (2019-07-11)
Even in svelte adults, cutting about 300 calories daily protects the heart
In adults already at a healthy weight or carrying just a few extra pounds, cutting around 300 calories a day significantly improved already good levels of cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar and other markers. (2019-07-11)
Cyborg-like microchip valve driven by earthworm muscle
Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan have developed the first microchip valve powered by living cells. (2019-07-09)
A tale of two proteins: The best and worst of metabolic adaptation
The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis states that the nutritional environment in early life makes people susceptible to lifestyle-related diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and heart attack, as adults. (2019-07-08)
CNIC scientists identify an essential protein for correct heart contraction and survival
A new study published in Circulation Research shows that loss of cardiac expression of SRSF3 leads to a critical reduction in the expression of genes related to contraction. (2019-07-08)
HIV infection may increase heart failure and stroke risk
A Journal of the American Heart Association analysis of information from a large health insurance database reveals that people living with HIV have an elevated risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), particularly heart failure and stroke. (2019-07-03)
Smokers three times likely to die from heart disease
Smoking is killing at least 17 Australians a day from preventable heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular conditions, new research led by The Australian National University (ANU) has found. (2019-07-03)
World first: Homing instinct applied to stem cells show cells 'home' to cardiac tissue
In a world first, scientists have found a new way to direct stem cells to heart tissue. (2019-07-03)
Quorn protein builds muscle better than milk protein
A study from the University of Exeter has found that mycoprotein, the protein-rich food source that is unique to Quorn products, stimulates post-exercise muscle building to a greater extent than milk protein. (2019-07-03)
How aerobic exercise and resistance training preserves muscle mass in obese older adults
Researchers report July 3 in the journal Cell Metabolism that combining aerobic exercise and resistance training helps elderly obese individuals preserve muscle mass and reverse frailty as they work to lose weight. (2019-07-03)
Cardiac genetic mutation may not always predict heart disease
One in 10 people with this condition were born with a mutation in the TTN gene, but -- until now -- it has been unclear whether everyone with these mutations will inevitably develop dilated cardiomyopathy. (2019-07-02)
Transformer cells: Shaping cellular 'behaviour'
Scientists from the Sechenov University, conjointly with their fellow Chinese and American researchers, have examined the latest advances in the use of skeletal muscle progenitor cells, specifying the core challenges inherent to the applicability of MPCs in cell therapy, and outlining the most promising breakthrough technologies. (2019-07-01)
'Shooting stars' during cell development impact risk for disease
Fleeting differences in gene expression between individuals that occur at different points in time during cell development may have consequences on the ultimate risk for disease in mature tissues and cell types. (2019-06-27)
A snapshot in time: Study captures fleeting cell differences that can alter disease risk
In cinema and science fiction, one small change in the past can have major, sometimes life-changing effects in the future. (2019-06-27)
Understanding what makes captive gorilla hearts tick
We've known for some time that heart disease is prevalent in captive gorilla populations and is a leading cause of death. (2019-06-26)
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