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Current Heat transfer News and Events

Current Heat transfer News and Events, Heat transfer News Articles.
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Too much sugar doesn't put the brakes on turbocharged crops
Plants make sugars to form leaves to grow and produce grains and fruits through the process of photosynthesis, but sugar accumulation can also slow down photosynthesis. (2019-11-11)
CO biosynthesis required for the assembly of the active site in NiFe-hydrogenase
The research group including researchers of National Institutes of Natural Sciences (ExCELLS/IMS), and Osaka University have revealed the detail mechanism of the biosynthesis of carbon monoxide essential for the maturation of the active site of NiFe-hydrogenase. (2019-11-07)
KIER Identified Ion Transfer Principles of Salinity Gradient Power Generation Technology
Dr. Kim Hanki of Jeju Global Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research(KIER) developed a mathematical analysis model that can identify the ion transfer principle of salinity gradient power technology. (2019-11-07)
Helping quinoa brave the heat
Scientists identify more efficient methods for evaluating heat tolerance. (2019-11-06)
The first Cr-based nitrides superconductor Pr3Cr10-xN11
New novel Cr-based nitride superconductor is discovered in cubic nitrides Pr3Cr10-xN11 at 5.25 K. (2019-11-06)
Adhesive which debonds in magnetic field could reduce landfill waste
Researchers at the University of Sussex have developed a glue which can unstick when placed in a magnetic field, meaning products otherwise destined for landfill, could now be dismantled and recycled at the end of their life. (2019-11-04)
Deep sea vents had ideal conditions for origin of life
By creating protocells in hot, alkaline seawater, a UCL-led research team has added to evidence that the origin of life could have been in deep-sea hydrothermal vents rather than shallow pools, in a new study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2019-11-04)
Mimicking body's circulatory AC could keep airplanes, cars and computers cooler
In a study published in the International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Ahmad Najafi, Ph.D., a professor in Drexel's College of Engineering, and his faculty collaborator, Jason Patrick, Ph.D., from North Carolina State University, report on how a computational technique they developed can quickly produce designs for 3D printing carbon-fiber composite materials with an internal vasculature optimized for active-cooling. (2019-10-31)
New technique lets researchers map strain in next-gen solar cells
Researchers have developed a way to map strain in lead halide perovskite solar cells without harming them. (2019-10-31)
The danger of great gift expectations
A new study shows that neatly wrapped gifts can inflate expectations about what's inside, which means poorly wrapped gifts may be more pleasing to recipients. (2019-10-30)
In and out with 10-minute electrical vehicle recharge
Electric vehicle owners may soon be able to pull into a fueling station, plug their car in, go to the restroom, get a cup of coffee and in 10 minutes, drive out with a fully charged battery, according to a team of engineers. (2019-10-30)
System provides cooling with no electricity
Imagine a device that can sit outside under blazing sunlight on a clear day, and without using any power cool things down by more than 23 degrees Fahrenheit (13 degrees Celsius). (2019-10-30)
Global warming's impact on undernourishment
Global warming may increase undernutrition through the effects of heat exposure on people, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Yuming Guo of Monash University, Australia, and colleagues. (2019-10-29)
Scientists warn of new health threat caused by global warming
We know global warming will affect food production, but Australian researchers believe it is also likely to increase illnesses caused by undernutrition, due to the effects of heat exposure. (2019-10-29)
Brown and white body fat speak different languages
Most adults have two types of body fat: white and brown. (2019-10-25)
Biological material boosts solar cell performance
Next-generation solar cells that mimic photosynthesis with biological material may give new meaning to the term 'green technology.' Adding the protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) to perovskite solar cells boosted the efficiency of the devices in a series of laboratory tests, according to an international team of researchers. (2019-10-22)
HARP eclipses CLIP in continuous, rapid and large-scale SLA 3D printing
Objects can be continuously printed from a vat of photocurable resin at rates exceeding 430 millimeters per hour, thanks to a new approach to rapid and large-scale stereolithographic 3d printing (SLA). (2019-10-17)
Highest throughput 3D printer is the future of manufacturing
Northwestern University researchers have developed a new, futuristic 3D printer that is so big and so fast it can print an object the size of an adult human in just a couple of hours. (2019-10-17)
Livestream available: metal to metal oxide progression
Study of charge transfer allows simpler real-time observation of catalysis. (2019-10-16)
Analysis of Galileo's Jupiter entry probe reveals gaps in heat shield modeling
The entry probe of the Galileo mission to Jupiter entered the planet's atmosphere in 1995 in fiery fashion, generating enough heat to cause plasma reactions on its surface. (2019-10-15)
Did early mammals turn to night life to protect their sperm?
Humans are diurnal -- we are active in the day and sleep at night. (2019-10-15)
Read to kids in Spanish; it'll help their English
Immigrant parents worry their children will struggle with reading and fret that as non-English speakers, they can't help. (2019-10-15)
How to control friction in topological insulators
Topological insulators are innovative materials that conduct electricity on the surface, but act as insulators on the inside. (2019-10-14)
Radiation detector with the lowest noise in the world boosts quantum work
The nanoscale radiation detector is a hundred times faster than its predecessors, and can function without interruption. (2019-10-11)
CO2 emissions cause lost labor productivity, new Concordia research shows
Extreme high temperatures caused by CO2 emissions could lead to losses in labor productivity. (2019-10-11)
Has global warming stopped? The tap of incoming energy cannot be turned off
A rapid increase in the global ocean heat content has been detected in observations during the warming slowdown period, at a rate of about 9.8 × 1021 J yr-1. (2019-10-10)
Modelling ion beam therapy
A group of physicists have used Monte Carlo modelling to produce a consistent theoretical interpretation of accurate experimental measurements of ion beams in liquid water, which is the most relevant substance for simulating interactions with human tissue. (2019-10-10)
How to keep cool in a blackout during a heatwave
If there is no power for air-conditioning, and tap water is the only resource available, spreading it across the skin is the best way to prevent the body overheating irrespective of the climate, according to a new study from the University of Sydney. (2019-10-08)
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2019
ORNL story tips: Reaching the boiling point for HVACs; showcasing innovation for technology transfer; using neutrons to lend insight into human tissue; and heating the core in a fusion prototype experiment. (2019-10-07)
Modified quantum dots capture more energy from light and lose less to heat
Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have synthesized magnetically-doped quantum dots that capture the kinetic energy of electrons created by ultraviolet light before it's wasted as heat. (2019-10-07)
Heat waves could increase substantially in size by mid-century, says new study
Scientists found that by mid-century, in a middle greenhouse emissions scenario, the average size of heat waves could increase by 50%. (2019-10-07)
Keeping cool with quantum wells
A research team at the University of Tokyo invented a semiconductor quantum well system that can efficiently cool electronic devices using established fabrication methods. (2019-10-03)
CNIC scientists discover a new mechanism for the transfer of maternal genetic material
CNIC researchers have identified a mechanism involved in the prevention of possible errors during the transfer of mitochondrial DNA from mothers to their offspring. (2019-10-03)
Combustion behavior of aromatics may provide keys to enhancing heavy oil extraction
The problem of petroleum depletion becomes more and pertinent every day. (2019-10-03)
How long does memory last? For shape memory alloys, the longer the better
Scientists captured live action details of the phase transitions of shape memory alloys, giving them a better idea how to improve their properties for applications. (2019-10-03)
NUS researchers contribute to a Science paper on high-performance low-cost thermoelectrics
Researchers from the National University of Singapore and Beihang University reported the high-performance SnS thermoelectric crystals combining the desirable features of low-cost, earth-abundant materials and environmental friendliness. (2019-10-01)
Shape affects performance of micropillars in heat transfer
A Washington University in St. Louis researcher has shown for the first time that the shape of a nanostructure has an effect on its ability to retain water. (2019-10-01)
Do celiac families need 2 toasters?
Parents using multiple kitchen appliances and utensils to prevent their child with celiac disease from being exposed to gluten may be able to eliminate some cumbersome steps. (2019-09-30)
Brave new world: Simple changes in intensity of weather events 'could be lethal'
Faced with extreme weather events and unprecedented environmental change, animals and plants are scrambling to catch up -- with mixed results. (2019-09-30)
Plugging the ozone hole has indirectly helped Antarctic sea ice to increase
A new study demonstrates that the recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole causes decreases in clouds over Southern Hemisphere (SH) high latitudes and increases in clouds over the SH extratropics. (2019-09-29)
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