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Current Hematology News and Events

Current Hematology News and Events, Hematology News Articles.
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Light-to-moderate exercise may bring benefits for sickle cell disease
While exercise offers benefits for a wide range of health conditions, it has historically been considered too dangerous for people living with sickle cell disease (SCD). (2019-11-19)
Study: Multidisciplinary transplantation evaluation shows promise for older adults
Older adults with blood cancers can benefit from a team-based, holistic evaluation before undergoing transplantation, according to a new study published today in Blood Advances. (2019-11-14)
Survey suggests mentorship in medical school is vital to future of hematology
A survey of US hematology-oncology fellows suggests medical school plays an important role in shaping their interest in pursuing careers in hematology, particularly when students are exposed to hematology and oncology as part of core clerkships in internal medicine and pediatrics. (2019-10-31)
Novel approach identifies factors linked to poor treatment outcomes in ALL
Profiling the metabolites produced in the bone marrow at the time of diagnosis enabled researchers to identify high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. (2019-10-24)
Scientists discover reasons why targeted immuno-oncology drugs sometimes fail
Researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. (2019-10-23)
Study finds racial disparities in treatment of multiple myeloma patients
Among patients with multiple myeloma, African-Americans and Hispanics start treatment with a novel therapy significantly later than white patients, according to a new study published today in Blood Advances. (2019-10-17)
Study: Ibrutinib linked to high blood pressure and other heart problems
Over half of people prescribed the targeted blood cancer-fighting drug ibrutinib developed new or worsened high blood pressure within six months of starting the medication, according to a new study published online today in Blood. (2019-10-03)
Exploring the risk of ALL in children with Down syndrome
Researchers discovered new clues that provide a better understanding of why children with Down syndrome have an increased risk of leukemia. (2019-09-24)
Changes in internal medicine subspecialty choices of women, men
This study used enrollment data to examine changes in the internal medicine subspecialty choices of women and men from 1991 to 2016. (2019-09-23)
Preclinical study reveals the impact of age on immunotherapy treatment for breast cancer
In order to understand the influence of aging on the effectiveness of immune checkpoint blockade therapy, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, and Harvard Medical School conducted preclinical studies using younger and older mice with triple negative breast cancer, finding that age affects the efficacy of ICB therapy. (2019-09-06)
How natural genetic differences can affect heart health
New study identifies genetic variants that may alter platelet function in cardiovascular disease (2019-09-04)
Having a parent, sibling, or child with blood cancer increases one's own risk
New data suggest that people who have a parent, sibling, or child with blood cancer have a higher likelihood of being diagnosed with the disease. (2019-08-08)
Uncovering secrets of bone marrow cells and how they differentiate
Researchers mapped distinct bone marrow niche populations and their differentiation paths for the bone marrow factory that starts from mesenchymal stromal cells and ends with three types of cells -- fat cells, bone-making cells and cartilage-making cells. (2019-07-31)
Postpartum transfusions on the rise, carry greater risk of adverse events
Women who receive a blood transfusion after giving birth are twice as likely to have an adverse reaction related to the procedure, such as fever, respiratory distress, or hemolysis (destruction of red blood cells), compared with non-pregnant women receiving the same care, according to a new study published today in Blood Advances. (2019-07-31)
New technique helps create more personalized therapies for people with advanced cancers
Using an ultra-sensitive and high-throughput isolation technology, UCLA researchers were able to characterize and identify the neoantigens driving the antitumor responses in a patient. (2019-07-22)
Many of the deadliest cancers receive the least amount of research funding
Many of the deadliest or most common cancers get the least amount of nonprofit research funding, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. (2019-07-18)
Adding immunotherapy after initial treatment can benefit metastatic lung cancer patients
Treating metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab after they've completed locally ablative therapy almost tripled the median progression-free survival (PFS) compared to the historical average. (2019-07-11)
Cardiac toxicity risk factors identified with relapsed multiple myeloma therapy
More than half of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma treated with carfilzomib experienced cardiac issues during treatment, according to a multi-institutional study published June 12, 2019 in Journal of Clinical Oncology. (2019-06-13)
Tart cherry shown to decrease joint pain, sore muscles in some breast cancer patients
Tart cherry reduces the musculoskeletal effects of aromatase inhibitors in patients with non-metastatic breast cancer, according to new findings from a clinical trial by researchers at Marshall University Joan C. (2019-06-10)
SIRT1 plays key role in chronic myeloid leukemia to aid persistence of leukemic stem cells
Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia are treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. (2019-06-10)
Walking speed predicts clinical outcomes in older adults with blood cancers
How slow -- or fast -- older individuals with blood cancers are able to walk four meters (about 13 feet) holds critical information about their overall health and strongly predicts survival and unplanned hospital visits regardless of age, cancer or treatment type, or other factors, according to a new study published today in Blood. The association was strongest in those with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. (2019-06-05)
Routine sickle cell disease screening among migrants may help save lives
Hematologists are zeroing in on the escalating humanitarian crisis in southern Europe by assessing the burden of blood disorders among refugees and identifying strategies to facilitate more timely identification and treatment of refugees with sickle cell disease (SCD). (2019-05-09)
Multiple myeloma: DNA rearrangement may predict poor outcomes
In multiple myeloma, Ig lambda translocations may indicate poor outcomes and resistance to immunomodulatory drugs such as lenalidomide. (2019-04-23)
Gene-based factor VIIa prevents bleeding episodes in animals with hemophilia
Hematology researchers have further refined how a treatment currently used on an urgent basis to control bleeding in hemophilia patients holds promise as a preventive treatment as well. (2019-04-15)
Southern Europeans, non-Europeans less likely to have matched stem cell donors
Although the pool of registered bone marrow donors has increased in recent years, a new study suggests that most people of southern-European and non-European descent are unlikely to have a suitable match if they need a life-saving bone marrow transplant. (2019-03-27)
A protein's surprising role offers clues to limit graft-vs.-host disease
In a surprising finding, researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center showed the protein NLRP6 aggravated the difficult symptoms of gastrointestinal graft-vs.-host disease. (2019-03-22)
How 'sleeper cell' cancer stem cells are maintained in chronic myelogenous leukemia
Even when chronic myelogenous leukemia is in remission, 'sleeper cell,' quiescent leukemic stem cells are maintained in microenvironments in the bone marrow. (2019-03-21)
Ultrasound for thrombosis prevention
Researchers established real-time ultrasonic monitoring of the blood's aggregate state using the in vitro blood flow model. (2019-03-06)
Do all chemotherapies have equal long-term heart risk?
Different chemotherapy drugs were associated with varying degrees of long-term risk of cardiomyopathy in survivors of childhood cancers, according to a new study that included a researcher from UT Health San Antonio. (2019-01-31)
Cancer causes premature ageing
New research shows that cancer causes premature ageing. Researchers studied Leukaemia, and found that it promotes premature ageing in healthy bone marrow cells. (2019-01-30)
Study: Increased risk of heart attack, stroke in months leading up to a cancer diagnosis
Older adults with cancer are more likely to have had a heart attack or stroke in the months prior to their cancer diagnosis compared with similar adults who do not have cancer during the same period, according to a report published online today in Blood. (2018-12-21)
Blood editors announce top 10 manuscripts of 2018
The editors of Blood, the most-cited journal in hematology, have selected the top manuscripts of 2018. (2018-12-20)
Sutimlimab shows promise for hard-to-treat, rare blood disorder
In a first-in-human clinical trial reported today in Blood, the investigational drug sutimlimab appeared to be effective in treating cold agglutinin disease, a rare chronic blood disorder for which there are currently no approved treatments. (2018-12-17)
Potential seen for tailoring treatment for acute myeloid leukemia
Rapid screening of leukemia cells for drug susceptibility and resistance are bringing scientists closer to patient-tailored treatment for acute myeloid leukemia. (2018-12-07)
Genetically engineered immune cells show promise for fighting relapsed blood cancer
At the 60th Annual American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting in San Diego on Monday, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers presented preliminary results from a clinical study of an investigational cellular immunotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma expressing the CD30 protein marker. (2018-12-03)
New two-year data show 39 percent of NHL patients treated with CAR T remain in remission
A new article published today in The Lancet Oncology shows 39 percent of large B cell lymphoma patients treated with the chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy (CAR T) Yescarta® (axicabtagene ciloleucel) remained in remission more than two years (27.1 months median follow up) following therapy, and more than half of the patients treated remain alive. (2018-12-02)
Studies suggest immunotherapy adds punch to earlier attempts
New drugs that harness the body's immune system to destroy cancer cells appear to increase the effectiveness of later drug therapies for non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma patients, new research suggests. (2018-12-01)
Experts present new recommendations on 'overlapping' type of leukemia
Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a rare disease with overlapping features of two categories of bone marrow and blood cell disorders that poses challenges in clinical management. (2018-11-30)
Platelets grown from stem cells may be alternative to donated platelets
Researchers have developed a way to grow human platelets in the laboratory from stem cells derived from fat tissue. (2018-11-28)
91 percent response rate for venetoclax against newly diagnosed AML in older adults
Clinical trial results published in the journal Nature Medicine and being presented this weekend at the American Society for Hematology Annual Meeting show 91 percent response rate to the combination of venetoclax with azacitidine in older adults newly diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). (2018-11-28)
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