Current Hibernation News and Events

Current Hibernation News and Events, Hibernation News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 7 | 247 Results
240 mammals help us understand the human genome
A large international consortium led by scientists at Uppsala University and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has sequenced the genome of 130 mammals and analysed the data together with 110 existing genomes to allow scientist to identify which are the important positions in the DNA. This new information can help both research on disease mutations in humans and how best to preserve endangered species. The study is published in Nature. (2020-11-11)

Identified the cellular process by which Cisplatin chemotherapy causes neuronal damage
Cisplatin induces senescence of peripheral neurons through overexpression of the p21 protein, which would explain the neuropathy. (2020-09-29)

Generational shifts help migratory bats keep pace with global warming
An international team of scientists led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research demonstrated that in the common noctule bat, one of the largest European bat species, the colonization of hibernacula progresses from lower to higher latitudes over successive generations of young animals - especially first-year males. Because of their relatively high reproduction rate and the long-distance dispersal of male juveniles, it is probably relatively easy for common noctules to adjust to global warming. (2020-09-23)

Genetic adaptation to climate change is swift in crop pests
By comparing genetic variants differing in the two fly populations, researchers found that polygenic traits led to the quickness of adaptation; many genes, each with very small effects, worked together to determine the rate of development. The research illustrates that crop pests and insect disease vectors with similar biology may rapidly respond to changing climates by a similar genetic mechanism. (2020-09-17)

Fossil evidence of 'hibernation-like' state in 250-million-year-old Antarctic animal
University of Washington scientists report evidence of a hibernation-like state in Lystrosaurus, an animal that lived in Antarctica during the Early Triassic, some 250 million years ago. The fossils are the oldest evidence of a hibernation-like state in a vertebrate, and indicate that torpor -- a general term for hibernation and similar states in which animals temporarily lower their metabolic rate to get through a tough season -- arose in vertebrates even before mammals and dinosaurs evolved. (2020-08-27)

Evidence of hibernation-like state in Antarctic animal
Among the many winter survival strategies in the animal world, hibernation is one of the most common. According to new research, this type of adaptation has a long history. In a paper published in the journal Communications Biology, scientists at Harvard University and the University of Washington report evidence of a hibernation-like state in an animal that lived in Antarctica during the Early Triassic, some 250 million years ago. (2020-08-27)

Invasive hedgehogs and ferrets habituate to and categorize smells
A new study published in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Applications examines how invasive mammalian predators both habituate to and generalize avian prey cues. (2020-07-15)

Hibernation in mice: Are humans next?
University of Tsukuba and RIKEN researchers identified cells in the brain that can induce a hibernation-like state in mice or rats, species that do not naturally hibernate. In this state, oxygen consumption, body temperature, heart rate, and respiration were all lowered, and animals spontaneously recovered without any tissue damage. Inducing this state in humans could have several medical benefits, especially for buying time in emergency medical situations and extending the life of organs for transplant. (2020-06-12)

Neuroscientists discover neural circuits that control hibernation-like behaviors in mice
Harvard Medical School neuroscientists have discovered a population of neurons in the hypothalamus that controls hibernation-like behavior, or torpor, in mice, revealing for the first time the neural circuits that regulate this state. By better understanding these processes in mice and other animal models, the authors envision the possibility of one day working toward inducing torpor in humans. (2020-06-11)

Bat 'super immunity' may explain how bats carry coronaviruses -- USask study
A University of Saskatchewan (USask) research team has uncovered how bats can carry the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus without getting sick -- research that could shed light on how coronaviruses make the jump to humans and other animals. (2020-05-06)

Improving immunotherapy for cancer
One of the reasons why cancer develops is because regulatory cells inhibit the body's immune defense. Researchers under the helm of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have discovered a mechanism for identifying regulatory cells in tumor tissue that suppress an immune response. Their findings may contribute to improving diagnosis and immunotherapy of cancer. (2020-04-29)

Shining light on sleeping cataclysmic binaries
Almost 35 years ago, scientists made the then-radical proposal that colossal hydrogen bombs called novae go through a very long-term life cycle after erupting, fading to obscurity for hundreds of thousands of years and then building up to become full-fledged novae once more. A new study confirms that the novae we observe flashing throughout the universe represent just a few percent of these cataclysmic variables, as they are known, with the rest ''hiding'' in hibernation. (2020-03-24)

Sugar-poor diets wreak havoc on bumblebee queens' health
UC Riverside study shows that without adequate sugar, a bumblebee queen's fat body, which functions like a human liver, does not correctly produce enzymes required for healthy metabolism and detoxification from pesticides. (2020-02-27)

Targeting hibernating breast cancer cells in the lung could reduce secondary cancers
Healthy lung cells support the survival of breast cancer cells, allowing them to hibernate in the lung before forming secondary tumors, according to new research, conducted in mice, from the Crick. The findings could help the development of new treatments that interfere with this behavior, reducing the number of secondary cancers. (2020-02-24)

First genetic evidence of resistance in some bats to white-nose syndrome, a devastating fungal disease
A new study from University of Michigan biologists presents the first genetic evidence of resistance in some bats to white-nose syndrome, a deadly fungal disease that has decimated some North American bat populations. (2020-02-20)

Light at the end of the tunnel for most individuals with low-vision
Progress in research and technology is giving rise to an optimistic future for compensation and restoration of low vision, according to research in a special issue of Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, published by IOS Press. Seven studies explore different aspects of vision loss after damage to the retina, optic nerve or brain due to diseases such as glaucoma or optic neuropathy. Remarkable progress is being made to treat conditions of partial blindness that have previously been considered irreversible. (2020-01-22)

Scientists hope to defeat infections after discovering bacterial espionage
University of Tartu scientists hope create a solution for chronic infections that do not respond to antibiotic treatment after having discovered mechanisms for listening in on sleeping bacteria. (2020-01-14)

Learning from the bears
Grizzly bears spend many months in hibernation, but their muscles do not suffer from the lack of movement. In the journal 'Scientific Reports', a team led by MDC researcher Michael Gotthardt reports on how they manage to do this. The grizzly bears' strategy could help prevent muscle atrophy in humans as well. (2019-12-30)

Easy prey: The largest bears in the world use small streams to fatten up on salmon
A new study reveals a different picture of how and when brown bears in southwestern Alaska eat salmon. Most of these bears, also known as grizzlies, are dipping into small streams to capture their iconic prey. (2019-12-19)

Hibernating mammals arouse hope for genetic solutions to obesity, metabolic diseases
Hibernation is one of nature's strangest quirks, inducing bears and other mammals to pack on massive weight -- amounts that would be unhealthy for humans -- so they can survive months of slumber. Yet when these animals reemerge, they are as fit as ever. Now University of Utah Health scientists say they have detected new genetic clues about this phenomenon that could lead to better understanding and treatment of obesity and metabolic disorders that afflict millions worldwide. (2019-11-26)

Yeasts in nectar can stimulate the growth of bee colonies
Researchers from KU Leuven have found that the presence of yeasts can alter the chemical composition and thus the nutritional value of nectar for pollinators such as bees. Moreover, the study found that yeasts can even boost bee health and colony fitness. 'Research into the role of microbes in our ecosystem is of vital importance to safeguard bees.' (2019-11-20)

Bats in attics might be necessary for conservation
Researchers investigate and describe the conservation importance of buildings relative to natural, alternative roosts for little brown bats in Yellowstone National Park. (2019-11-19)

Solution of the high-resolution crystal structure of stress proteins from Staphylococcus
One of the main factors favoring a microorganism's survival in extreme conditions is preserving ribosomes -- a macromolecular complex comprising RNA and proteins (2019-11-06)

WSU grizzly research reveals remarkable genetic regulation during hibernation
New RNA sequencing-based genetic research conducted at Washington State University's Bear Research, Education, and Conservation Center shows grizzlies express a larger number of genes in preparation for, and during hibernation to cope with such stressors, than do any other species studied. (2019-09-18)

Mosquitoes push northern limits with time-capsule eggs to survive winters
Invasive mosquitoes at the northern limit of their current range are surviving conditions that are colder than those in their native territory. This new evidence of rapid local adaptation could have implications for efforts to control the spread of this invasive species. (2019-08-21)

Climate is changing faster than animal adaptation
An international team of scientists reviewed more than 10,000 published climate change studies and has reached a sobering conclusion. Birds and other animals cannot adapt fast enough to keep pace with climate change, throwing species survival in doubt. (2019-08-20)

Species aren't adapting fast enough to cope with climate change, according to new study
Many species are adapting to climate change, but those adaptations aren't occurring fast enough to guarantee their long-term survival, according to a recent study that analyzed 10,000 published scientific papers. An Iowa State University biologist contributed to the international research team. (2019-08-01)

Early arrival of spring disrupts the mutualism between plants and pollinators
Early snowmelt increases the risk of phenological mismatch, in which the flowering of periodic plants and pollinators fall out of sync, compromising seed production. (2019-07-12)

Climate change has long-term impact on species adaptability
Historic climate change events can have a lasting impact on the genetic diversity of a species, reveals a new study on the alpine marmot. (2019-05-20)

The hunger gaps: How flowering times affect farmland bees
For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. This novel finding reveals new ways of making farmland better for pollinators, benefitting the many crop plants and wildflowers that depend on them. (2019-05-01)

Vaccination may help protect bats from deadly disease
A new study shows that vaccination may reduce the impact of white-nose syndrome in bats, marking a milestone in the international fight against one of the most destructive wildlife diseases in modern times. (2019-05-01)

Soft tissue makes coral tougher in the face of climate change
A new study conducted by scientists at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa and the California Academy of Sciences revealed soft tissues that cover the rocky coral skeleton promote the recovery of corals following a bleaching event. (2019-04-23)

Long-lived bats could hold secrets to mammal longevity
University of Maryland researchers analyzed an evolutionary tree reconstructed from the DNA of a majority of known bat species and found four bat lineages that exhibit extreme longevity. They also identified, for the first time, two life history features that predict extended life spans in bats. (2019-04-10)

Beware of sleeping queens underfoot this spring
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have discovered a never before reported behaviour of queen bumblebees. (2019-03-20)

Hibernating hamsters could provide new clues to Alzheimer's disease
Syrian hamsters are golden-haired rodents often kept as house pets. Cold and darkness can cause the animals to hibernate for 3-4 days at a time, interspersed with short periods of activity. Surprisingly, the hibernation spurts of these cute, furry creatures could hold clues to better treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a recent study in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research. (2019-02-06)

Does mountaintop removal also remove rattlesnakes?
Timber rattlesnakes, according to the study's author, are among the most docile creatures in Appalachia. They choose places to hibernate that are more likely to be surface mined due to their ridgetop locations. Mining thus put this species at a disadvantage and reduces the biodiversity of the area. (2019-01-03)

Annual, biological rhythms govern milk production in dairy cows
The amount and composition of milk produced by dairy cows appears to be more regulated by internal, annual biological rhythms than by environmental factors such as heat and humidity, according to Penn State researchers who studied more than a decade of production records from herds across the country. (2018-12-20)

Himalayan marmot genome offers clues to life at extremely high altitudes
Himalayan marmots can survive at altitudes up to 5,000 meters in the Himalayan regions of India, Nepal, and Pakistan and on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau of China, where many of them face extreme cold, little oxygen, and few other resources. Now, researchers have sequenced the first complete Himalayan marmot genome, which may help them to better explain how the marmots live in such extremes. The findings appear Dec. 20 in the journal iScience. (2018-12-20)

Multicultural creatures of habit
Every year trillions of animals migrate for thousands of kilometres between their summer and winter areas. Among them are several species of bats whose journeys in the dark of the night unfold largely unnoticed by humans and have only partially been investigated by science. A reconstruction of individual migration patterns of the common noctule (Nyctalus noctula) in Central Europe has now revealed that travelling distances vary largely among individuals, yet overall females cover longer distances than males. (2018-12-18)

Researchers discover how 'cryptic' connections in disease transmission influence epidemics
A new study by researchers of disease transmission in bats has broad implications for understanding hidden connections that can spread diseases between species and lead to large-scale outbreaks. (2018-11-19)

Page 1 of 7 | 247 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.