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Current Hip replacement News and Events

Current Hip replacement News and Events, Hip replacement News Articles.
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Scientists replace malfunctioning 'vacuum cleaner' cells linked to neurological disorders
Malfunctioning microglia are associated with a range of neurological diseases. (2020-08-11)
Oxytocin can help prevent osteoporosis
In a laboratory experiment with rats, Brazilian researchers succeeded in reversing natural processes associated with aging that lead to loss of bone density and strength. (2020-08-10)
Lung-specific risk factors may increase hip fracture risk in individuals who smoke
Smoking has been linked to a higher risk of bone fractures. (2020-08-05)
Computational modeling enables heart valve visualizations
Computational modeling has provided new insights into the heart's vascular system, a complex and mechanically demanding system that remains poorly understood. (2020-08-05)
Changes in opioid use after hip, knee replacement
Researchers looked at changes in opioid prescribing rates and level of pain control in patients who had hip or knee replacement in the U.S. from 2014 to 2017. (2020-07-30)
Group-based smoking cessation help US inmates quit tobacco
Behavioral and nicotine replacement therapies offered together can help people who are incarcerated quit smoking, according to Rutgers researchers. (2020-07-30)
COVID-19 may cause deadly blood clots
COVID-19 may increase the risk of blot cots in women who are pregnant or taking estrogen with birth control or hormone replacement therapy, according to a new manuscript published in the Endocrine Society's journal, Endocrinology. (2020-07-29)
Engineers find thinner tissues in replacement heart valves create problematic flutter
Iowa State and University of Texas engineers have developed high-fidelity computational models of replacement heart valves to examine the performance of biological tissues built into the valves. (2020-07-29)
Adjusting FRAX estimates to account for site of recent fracture
This important new study by Kanis et al provides probability ratios that can be used to adjust conventional FRAX estimates of fracture probability by accounting for the site of a recent fracture. (2020-07-28)
Study seeks to explain decline in hip fracture rates
In a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine today, researchers showed how analysis of data from the multigenerational Framingham Osteoporosis Study may in part explain why the incidence of hip fracture in the US has declined during the last two decades. (2020-07-27)
Fewer hip fractures may be associated with reductions in smoking, heavy drinking
A new study, which analyzed 40 years of Framingham Heart Study data, found an association between lowered rates of hip fractures and decreases in smoking and heavy drinking. (2020-07-27)
Phage therapy shows potential for treating prosthetic joint infections
Bacteriophages, or phages, may play a significant role in treating complex bacterial infections in prosthetic joints, according to new Mayo Clinic research. (2020-07-23)
Putting the spring-cam back into stroke patients steps
A research group has developed a new, lightweight and motor-less device that can be easily attached to an ankle support device - otherwise known as an ankle foot orthosis (AFO). (2020-07-22)
Un-natural mRNAs modified with sulfur atoms boost efficient protein synthesis
A group of Japanese scientists has succeeded in the development of modified messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that contain sulfur atoms in the place of oxygen atoms of phosphate moieties of natural mRNAs. (2020-07-16)
Immediate dialysis no better than wait-until-necessary approach, researchers find
In the largest international study of its kind, researchers at the University of Alberta and Toronto's St. (2020-07-16)
New heart valve could transform open heart surgery for millions of patients globally
A new polymeric heart valve with a life span potentially longer than current artificial valves that would also prevent the need for the millions of patients with diseased heart valves to require life-long blood thinning tablets has been developed by scientists at the universities of Bristol and Cambridge. (2020-06-29)
From the lab, the first cartilage-mimicking gel that's strong enough for knees
The thin, slippery layer of cartilage between the bones in the knee is magical stuff: strong enough to withstand a person's weight, but soft and supple enough to cushion the joint against impact, over decades of repeat use. (2020-06-26)
Comprehensive evaluation of mitral valve-in-valve and valve-in-ring
Mitral valve-in-valve (ViV) and valve-in-ring (ViR) are alternatives to surgical reoperation in patients with recurrent mitral valve failure after previous surgical valve repair or replacement. (2020-06-25)
New therapy reduces chronic low back pain in large international study
A new study has found that tanezumab, a monoclonal antibody that inhibits nerve activity, provides relief in patients with chronic low back pain, one of the leading reasons why people seek medical care and the number one cause of disability worldwide. (2020-06-19)
Why and to what extent a large hip protects from type 2 diabetes and CVD
In a Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology review article Norbert Stefan from the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), the University Hospital of Tübingen and the Boston Children's Hospital, highlights why and to what extent a large hip circumference, an estimate of increased fat mass in the lower part of the body, protects from type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). (2020-06-18)
'Remarkably high' rate of suicide among elderly patients after hip fracture
Older adults who suffer a hip fracture requiring surgery are at a higher risk of suicide, suggests a study in the June 17, 2020 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. (2020-06-17)
SFU researchers working to improve quality of life for seniors in long-term care
Simon Fraser University researchers are hoping their latest study on seniors will help to address one of their biggest physical challenges -- injury from falls. (2020-06-17)
Study finds Oregon's gender-affirming health care good on paper; still lacking in practice
While Oregon ranks highly nationwide for its gender-affirming policies and health care for transgender women, many of those polices are not fully realized in practice, a recent study from Oregon State University found. (2020-06-17)
Shining like a diamond: A new species of diamond frog from northern Madagascar
Despite the active ongoing taxonomic progress on the Madagascar frogs, the amphibian inventory of this hyper-diverse island is still very far from being complete. (2020-06-16)
Switching from general to regional anaesthesia may cut greenhouse gas emissions
Switching from general to regional anaesthesia may help cut greenhouse emissions and ultimately help reduce global warming, indicates a real life example at one US hospital over the course of a year, and reported in the journal Regional Anesthesia & Pain Medicine. (2020-06-16)
Low physical function increase the risk for bone loss in older hip fracture patients
Low physical function and low muscle mass after hip fracture increased the risk for accelerated bone deterioration in older hip fracture patients. (2020-06-15)
Romosozumab in osteoporosis: Considerable added benefit for women after menopause
Treatment leads to fewer vertebral fractures and to fewer other typical fractures in postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis at high risk of fracture. (2020-06-15)
People with diabetes are at greater risk of bone fractures
People living with diabetes are at greater risk of bone fractures, new research led by the University of Sheffield has found. (2020-06-11)
Healthcare professional revenue falls nearly 50% across nation during COVID-19 pandemic
In April 2020, in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare professional services declined 68 percent in utilization and 48% in revenue based on total estimated in-network amounts compared to April 2019 nationally. (2020-06-10)
Self-healing bone cement
Material scientists at the University of Jena have developed a bone replacement based on calcium phosphate cement and reinforced with carbon fibers. (2020-06-10)
Orthotics breakthrough helps children with Cerebral Palsy walk and play
Children with Cerebral Palsy have more energy to play and be physically active for longer thanks to specially designed orthotics. (2020-06-09)
Improved MRI scans could aid in development of arthritis treatments
An algorithm which analyses MRI images and automatically detects small changes in knee joints over time could be used in the development of new treatments for arthritis. (2020-06-09)
Osteoporosis treatment may also protect against pneumonia
A recent study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research found that nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs) such as alendronate, which are widely used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis, are linked with lower risks of pneumonia and of dying from pneumonia. (2020-06-03)
Nanoparticles can make home refrigeration more accessible for low-income households
Power consumption of a home refrigerator can be cut by 29% while improving cooling capacity. (2020-05-30)
Study reports nursing home hip fracture rates stay persistently high
A recent study of hip fracture rates in nursing homes in the U.S. reports a slight rise in the rate of hip fractures among long-stay residents in recent years. (2020-05-27)
Study finds TAVR is safe treatment for patients with bicuspid valve disease
For many patients with a bicuspid aortic valve that needs replacing, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) appears to be a safe treatment option with low complication rates, according to a study published in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. (2020-05-27)
Bricks made from plastic, organic waste
Revolutionary 'green' types of bricks and construction materials could be made from recycled PVC, waste plant fibres or sand with the help of a remarkable new kind of rubber polymer discovered by Australian scientists. (2020-05-26)
It may take up to a year to get through elective surgeries due to COVID-19
A new study by Johns Hopkins researchers found that it may take between seven and 16 months for surgeons to complete the backlog of elective orthopaedic surgeries that have been suspended during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-05-26)
More people die when hospital bed shortages force patients out
Hip fractures have higher mortality rates if patients are discharged early because the hospital needs the space and capacity. (2020-05-20)
Good news for menopausal women taking hop supplements: Tests show no drug interactions
Hop-based dietary supplements that many women use to ease the night sweats and hot flashes commonly reported during menopause aren't likely to cause drug interactions. (2020-05-18)
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