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Current HIV News and Events

Current HIV News and Events, HIV News Articles.
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Exploring mechanisms of resistance to HIV in people with sickle cell disease
A new analysis supports prior reports that people with sickle cell disease have lower rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, but follow-up cell studies did not reveal a mechanism to explain the reduced risk. (2020-04-08)
Depressive disorders are 'under recognized and under treated' in people with HIV/AIDS
People living with HIV/AIDS are at increased risk of depressive disorders. (2020-04-07)
Risk of HIV-related heart disease risk varies by geography, income
People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared to people without HIV. (2020-04-01)
Understanding the HIV-1 rev regulatory axis may help researchers to halt AIDS progression
HIV infection and replication within a human cell is a complex mechanism that involves multiple steps and several biochemical factors such as nucleic acids and proteins. (2020-03-31)
A new way to study HIV's impact on the brain
Using a newly developed laboratory model of three types of brain cells, Penn and CHOP scientists reveal how HIV infection -- as well as the drugs that treat it -- can take a toll on the central nervous system. (2020-03-27)
New hepatitis C cases down by almost 70% in HIV positive men in London and Brighton
New cases of hepatitis C amongst HIV positive men in London and Brighton have fallen by nearly 70% in recent years. (2020-03-25)
Scientists proposed a way of producing water-soluble fullerene compounds for medicine
Scientists developed a single-step method to obtain water-soluble fullerene compounds with remarkable biological properties, such as the ability to effectively suppress the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). (2020-03-17)
Immunotherapy combo achieves reservoir shrinkage in HIV model
Stimulating immune cells with two cancer immunotherapies together can shrink the size of the viral 'reservoir' in SIV-infected non-human primates treated with antiviral drugs. (2020-03-16)
Newer anti-HIV drugs safest, most effective during pregnancy
The antiretroviral drugs dolutegravir and emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide fumarate (DTG+FTC/TAF) may comprise the safest and most effective HIV treatment regimen currently available during pregnancy, researchers announced today. (2020-03-11)
The Lancet HIV: Study suggests a second patient has been cured of HIV
A study of the second HIV patient to undergo successful stem cell transplantation from donors with a HIV-resistant gene, finds that there was no active viral infection in the patient's blood 30 months after they stopped anti-retroviral therapy, according to a case report published in The Lancet HIV journal and presented at CROI (Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections). (2020-03-10)
Drug-delivery technology leads to sustained HIV antibody production in NIH study
A new approach to direct the body to make a specific antibody against HIV led to sustained production of that antibody for more than a year among participants in an NIH clinical trial. (2020-03-09)
New branded PrEP not worth the high cost compared with generic formulation
A newly approved drug for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) may undermine efforts to expand access to HIV prevention for the nation's most vulnerable populations, experts say. (2020-03-09)
NIH study finds lower concentration of PrEP drug in pregnant young women
Among African adolescent girls and young women who took HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) daily, levels of the PrEP drug tenofovir were more than 30% lower in those who were pregnant than in those who had recently given birth. (2020-03-09)
Simple method to prevent HIV in South Africa and Uganda works
A large research study in South Africa and Uganda using mobile vans to dispense antiretroviral treatment was very effective. (2020-03-09)
Liver fibrosis tied to specific heart failure, regardless of HIV or hepatitis C status
While there is an association between liver fibrosis and heart failure, the mechanisms for this association are currently unclear but may be of particular importance for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and/or hepatitis C, both of which are chronic infections that affect the liver and heart. (2020-03-06)
Curcumin is the spice of life when delivered via tiny nanoparticles
For years, curry lovers have sworn by the anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric, but its active compound, curcumin, has long frustrated scientists hoping to validate these claims with clinical studies. (2020-03-05)
HIV reservoirs in humans: Immediate antiretroviral therapy makes them 100 times smaller
Thanks to an unprecedented access to blood, and biopsies of rectums and lymph nodes of people at the earliest stages of HIV infection, an international team of researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM), the US Military HIV Research Program and the Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre has shown that the first established reservoirs are still 'sensitive' during these early stages and could be downsized about 100 times upon immediate ART initiation. (2020-03-04)
Drinking weakens bones of people living with HIV: BU study
For people living with HIV, any level of alcohol consumption is associated with lower levels of a protein involved in bone formation, raising the risk of osteoporosis, according to a new study by researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and School of Medicine (BUSM) and published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. (2020-03-03)
Survival of the fittest: How primate immunodeficiency viruses are evolving
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) found that unlike immunodeficiency viruses (IVs) that infect other primates, the IV that infects the greater spot-nosed monkey is able to antagonize human BST-2 to survive and proliferate. (2020-03-03)
Gladstone scientists identify new human genes controlling HIV infection
A team of Gladstone Institutes scientists led by Senior Investigator Nevan Krogan, PhD, has been cataloging host proteins that physically bind to virus proteins. (2020-02-20)
People living with HIV diagnosed with COPD 12 years younger than HIV-negative people
Researchers analyzed incidences of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among adults 35 years and older who were living with and without HIV between 1996 and 2015 in Ontario - where over 40 per cent of Canadians living with HIV reside. (2020-02-18)
NIH study supports new approach for treating cerebral malaria
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health found evidence that specific immune cells may play a key role in the devastating effects of cerebral malaria, a severe form of malaria that mainly affects young children. (2020-02-18)
Vitamin E effective, safe for fatty liver in HIV patients
A type of fatty liver disease that commonly affects patients with HIV can be safely treated with vitamin E, a McGill-led study has found. (2020-02-14)
Alarmingly low rates of HIV testing among at-risk teenage boys
The majority of teenage boys most at risk for developing HIV are not being tested for the disease, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. (2020-02-11)
Young men unaware of risks of HPV infection and need for HPV vaccination
Young sexual minority men -- including those who are gay, bisexual, queer or straight-identified men who have sex with men -- do not fully understand their risk for human papillomavirus (HPV) due to a lack of information from health care providers, according to Rutgers researchers. (2020-02-11)
Youth with HIV less likely than adults to achieve viral suppression
Despite similar rates of enrollment into medical care, youth with HIV have much lower rates of viral suppression --reducing HIV to undetectable levels -- compared to adults, according to an analysis funded by the National Institutes of Health. (2020-02-10)
Study finds innate protein that restricts HIV replication by targeting lipid rafts
A recent study from the George Washington University suggests that the innate protein AIBP restricts HIV-1 replications by targeting the lipid rafts the virus relies on. (2020-02-10)
Changes in the cost over tine of HIV antiretroviral therapy in US
Researchers calculated the average cost of recommended initial HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens in the US from 2012 to 2018 and analyzed how this cost has changed over the years. (2020-02-03)
HIV antibody therapy is associated with enhanced immune responses in infected individuals
Studies have demonstrated that immunotherapy combining two anti-HIV antibodies can suppress HIV, similar to antiretroviral therapy (ART). (2020-02-03)
Highly active HIV antibody restricts development of viral resistance
A research team led by Univ.-Prof. Dr. Florian Klein of the Institute of Virology of the University Hospital Cologne and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) has identified a new highly active antibody targeting HIV. (2020-01-31)
Religiousness linked to improved quality of life for people with HIV
Adults living with HIV in Washington, D.C., were more likely to feel higher levels of emotional and physical well-being if they attended religious services regularly, prayed daily, felt 'God's presence,' and self-identified as religious or spiritual, according to research published online Jan. (2020-01-31)
HIV outcomes improved by state-purchased insurance plans, study finds
Increasing enrollment in the plans could save millions in healthcare costs and even reduce HIV transmission, the researchers say. (2020-01-30)
Imaging study of key viral structure shows how HIV drugs work at atomic level
Salk scientists have discovered how a powerful class of HIV drugs binds to a key piece of HIV machinery. (2020-01-30)
How HIV develops resistance to key drugs discovered
The mechanism behind how HIV can develop resistance to a widely-prescribed group of drugs has been uncovered by new research from the Crick and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, with the findings opening the door to the development of more effective treatments. (2020-01-30)
A brain link to STI/HIV sexual risk
Data show that young adult women in the United States have high rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) that increase their risk of HIV. (2020-01-27)
In animal models, a 'shocking' step toward a potential HIV cure
Yerkes and UNC researchers report sustained latency reversal in two animal models of HIV infection. (2020-01-22)
Researchers reverse HIV latency, important scientific step toward cure
Overcoming HIV latency -- induction of HIV in CD4+ T cells that lay dormant throughout the body - is a major step toward creating a cure for HIV. (2020-01-22)
NIH-supported scientists reverse HIV and SIV latency in two animal models
In a range of experiments, scientists have reactivated resting immune cells that were latently infected with HIV or its monkey relative, SIV, in cells in the bloodstream and a variety of tissues in animals. (2020-01-22)
Dying people give last gift to help cure HIV
New year, new promise? Despite decades of research, scientists do not fully know all the places HIV hides in the human body. (2020-01-21)
New discovery on the activity and function of MAIT cells during acute HIV infection
In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers at Karolinska Institutet show that MAIT cells (mucosa-associated invariant T cells), part of the human immune system, respond with dynamic activity and reprogramming of gene expression during the initial phase of HIV infection. (2020-01-14)
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