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Current Hiv News and Events, Hiv News Articles.
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A promising HIV vaccine shows signs of cross-protective benefits
One of the most successful candidate HIV vaccines to date -- initially tested in Thailand, where it had modest effects -- showed surprisingly strong efficacy when evaluated in a South African cohort, where a different strain of HIV is known to circulate. (2019-09-18)
Cross clade immune responses found in South Africa from the RV144/Thai HIV vaccine regimen
A clade B/E based vaccine regimen induced cross-clade responses in South Africans and, at peak immunogenicity, the South African vaccines exhibited significantly higher cellular and antibody immune responses than the Thai vaccines. (2019-09-18)
Starting HIV treatment in ERs may be key to ending HIV spread worldwide
In a follow-up study conducted in South Africa, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have evidence that hospital emergency departments (EDs) worldwide may be key strategic settings for curbing the spread of HIV infections in hard-to-reach populations if the EDs jump-start treatment and case management as well as diagnosis of the disease. (2019-09-16)
Texas Biomed researchers pinpoint why HIV patients are more likely to develop tuberculosis
Tuberculosis and HIV -- two of the world's deadliest infectious diseases -- are far worse when they occur together. (2019-09-12)
URI scientists establish link between prenatal HIV exposure and decreased infant immunity
In the August 16, 2019 edition of Nature Scientific Reports, scientists at the University of Rhode Island provide concrete evidence linking the specific immune responses in HIV-negative babies to the HIV-positive status of their mothers. (2019-09-10)
HIV significantly increases risk for irregular heartbeat
HIV infection significantly increases the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) -- one of the most important causes of irregular heartbeats and a leading cause of stroke -- at the same rate or higher than known risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco. (2019-09-09)
Infant model of HIV opens new avenues for research
Researchers have developed an animal model to test HIV infection and therapies in infants, allowing them to develop biomarkers to predict viral rebound after antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption. (2019-09-05)
Helminthic infections may be beneficial against HIV-1
Infection with parasitic helminths can reduce the susceptibility of T-cells to HIV-1 infection, according to a study published Sept. (2019-09-05)
Following three failed replications of 2016 study, Science maintains 'EEoC'
After having issued an Editorial Expression of Concern on a 2016 Science study by Siddappa N. (2019-09-05)
PrEParing family planning clinics in Kenya to prevent new HIV infections
In sub-Saharan Africa, many young women and adolescent girls are at high risk of HIV infection. (2019-09-03)
Mutation that causes rare muscle disease protects against HIV-1 infection
A mutation that causes a type of muscular dystrophy that affects the limbs protects against HIV-1 infection, according to a study published Aug. (2019-08-29)
New sequencing study provides insight into HIV vaccine protection
Scientists led by the US Military HIV Research Program (MHRP) identified a transcriptional signature in B cells associated with protection from SIV or HIV infection in five independent trials of HIV-1 vaccine candidates. (2019-08-28)
HIV-positive New Yorkers are living longer but still dying from underlying infection, not just from old age
A review of the autopsy reports of 252 men and women who died of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in New York City between 1984 and 2016 reveals several long-term trends in combatting the epidemic. (2019-08-28)
Addressing causes of mortality in Zambia
Despite the fact that people in sub-Saharan Africa are now living longer than they did two decades ago, their average life expectancy remains below that of the rest of the world population. (2019-08-23)
Heavy drinking and HIV don't mix
Heavy alcohol consumption (3 drinks or more/day for women and 4 drinks or more/day for men) is linked to alterations in immune function among people with HIV. (2019-08-22)
Here's how early humans evaded immunodeficiency viruses
The cryoEM structure of a simian immunodeficiency virus protein bound to primate proteins shows how a mutation in early humans allowed our ancestors to escape infection while monkeys and apes did not. (2019-08-22)
Repeated semen exposure promotes host resistance to infection in preclinical HIV model
Contrary to the long-held view that semen can only act as a way to transmit HIV-1 from men to women, scientists at The Wistar Institute and the University of Puerto Rico found that frequent and sustained semen exposure can change the characteristics of the circulating and vaginal tissue immune cells that are targets for infection, reducing the susceptibility to a future infection. (2019-08-21)
Age-related illness risk for people living with HIV
The first large-scale review into the health outcomes of people living with HIV has found that this group has an increased risk of contracting specific diseases and illnesses, some of which are more commonly associated with ageing. (2019-08-15)
New BioIVT research examines potential link between HIV integrase inhibitor drugs and neural tube defects during pregnancy
BioIVT announced that researchers in its Transporter Sciences Group have co-authored a peer-reviewed paper, which investigates the inhibitory effects of a class of HIV drugs known as integrase inhibitors on folate transporter pathways. (2019-08-15)
Newly developed approach shows promise in silencing HIV infection
Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have discovered a new potential medication that works with an HIV-infected person's own body to further suppress the ever present but silent virus that available HIV treatments are unable to combat. (2019-08-06)
Despite treatment, elderly cancer patients have worse outcomes if HIV-positive
Elderly cancer patients who are HIV-positive have worse outcomes compared to cancer patients in the same age range who do not have HIV. (2019-08-01)
Unmasking the hidden burden of tuberculosis in Mozambique
The real burden of tuberculosis is probably higher than estimated, according to a study on samples from autopsies performed in a Mozambican hospital. (2019-08-01)
For children born with HIV, adhering to medication gets harder with age
Children born with HIV in the U.S. were less likely to adhere to their medications as they aged from preadolescence to adolescence and into young adulthood. (2019-07-31)
HIV spreads through direct cell-to-cell contact
The spread of pathogens like the HI virus is often studied in a test tube, i.e. in two-dimensional cell cultures, even though it hardly reflects the much more complex conditions in the human body. (2019-07-25)
How HIV infection may contribute to wide-ranging metabolic conditions
HIV-infected cells release vesicles that contain a viral protein called Nef, impairing cholesterol metabolism and triggering inflammation in uninfected bystander cells, according to a study published July 25, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Dmitri Sviridov of the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia, and colleagues. (2019-07-25)
Study reveals how HIV infection may contribute to metabolic conditions
A single viral factor released from HIV-infected cells may wreak havoc on the body and lead to the development of metabolic diseases. (2019-07-25)
Multiple dosing of long-acting rilpivirine in a model of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis
A long-acting antiretroviral agent such as rilpivirine could further improve pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), already shown to be safe and effective at preventing AIDS in high risk populations, as it could overcome problems with poor medication adherence. (2019-07-25)
Scientists pinpoint new mechanism that impacts HIV infection
A team of scientists led by Texas Biomed's Assistant Professor Smita Kulkarni, Ph.D. and Mary Carrington, Ph.D., at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, published results of a study that pinpointed a long noncoding RNA molecule which influences a key receptor involved in HIV infection and progression of the disease. (2019-07-24)
ADVANCE study provides evidence for shift to dolutegravir-containing ART in SA
The Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute and partners have presented evidence for a shift to dolutegravir-containing antiretroviral treatment in South Africa. (2019-07-24)
Viral HIV vaccine gives durable protection against 'death star' strain
Efforts to develop an effective HIV vaccine have repeatedly stumbled on one tough research strain, SIVmac239. (2019-07-24)
Mount Sinai researchers develop novel vaccine that induces antibodies that contribute to protection
Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed a novel vaccine consisting of DNA and recombinant proteins?proteins composed of a portion of an HIV protein and another unrelated protein. (2019-07-23)
Open-label study of a vaginal ring for HIV prevention suggests women want and will use it
Results of an open-label study of vaginal ring intended to be used for a month at a time found the majority of participants wanted the ring being offered, with measures of adherence also indicating they are willing to use it to protect themselves against HIV. (2019-07-23)
Most women use vaginal ring for HIV prevention in open-label study
In an open-label study of women in southern and eastern Africa, a vaginal ring that is inserted once a month and slowly releases an antiviral drug was estimated to reduce the risk of HIV by 39%, according to statistical modeling. (2019-07-23)
PrEP use high but wanes after three months among young African women
In a study of open-label Truvada as daily pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV among young African women and adolescent girls, 95% initiated PrEP, and most used PrEP for the first three months. (2019-07-23)
Risk of neural tube defects higher for babies of women on HIV therapy with dolutegrav
Children born to women on HIV therapy containing the drug dolutegravir since conception have a slightly higher risk of neural tube defects, compared to children born to women on regimens of other antiretroviral drugs. (2019-07-22)
HPTN 071 modelling and cost analyses show benefits of community HIV testing and treatment
Continuation of community-wide HIV testing and prompt initiation of treatment as delivered in the HPTN 071 (PopART) study in South Africa and Zambia could lead to substantial reductions in new HIV cases, be cost-effective, and help to achieve the UNAIDS 2030 targets, according to projections from mathematical modelling and cost-effectiveness analyses presented today at the 10th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Science in Mexico City (IAS 2019). (2019-07-22)
Serious falls are a health risk for adults under 65
Adults who take several prescription medications are more likely to experience serious falls, say Yale researchers and their co-authors in a new study. (2019-07-22)
Engaging disenfranchised US populations into HIV care helps suppress the virus
Engaging disenfranchised men who have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV in the US is possible, but the best way to help them achieve and maintain viral suppression is not yet known, according to findings from HPTN 078 being reported today at the 10th IAS Conference on HIV Science (IAS 2019) in Mexico City. (2019-07-22)
Connection to HIV care helps hardly reached US populations suppress the virus
Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men and transgender women with HIV, who are not in care, can be engaged in care when reached and connected with HIV treatment services, according to findings from a clinical trial supported by NIH. (2019-07-22)
Researchers compare visceral leishmaniasis diagnostic tests
Accurate and timely diagnosis of the tropic disease visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is one of the pillars for reducing VL deaths. (2019-07-18)
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