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Current Hiv News and Events

Current Hiv News and Events, Hiv News Articles.
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Many hepatitis infections go undiagnosed in cancer patients
Results from the largest study of hepatitis B and C and HIV infection prevalence in cancer patients show an alarmingly high rate of undiagnosed acute and chronic hepatitis B and C. (2019-01-17)
Combination therapy treats leishmaniasis, HIV patients
Coinfection with visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been observed in at least 35 countries on four continents and requires special case management. (2019-01-17)
Combination therapy more effective in treating patients with leishmaniasis and HIV
The results of clinical trials conducted in Ethiopia by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), in partnership with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), the University of Gondar, and Addis Ababa University, open the way for more effective and safer treatments for people with both HIV and visceral leishmaniasis (VL), a group of patients who have historically suffered from poor treatment options. (2019-01-17)
Being HIV positive and staying on antiretroviral therapy in Africa: A systematic review
An international team of researchers have carried out a review of the evidence examining what influences people who are HIV positive to go to health services and then stay on antiretroviral drugs in Africa. (2019-01-11)
HIV protein function that slows migration of T cells also improves viral survival
A study from a Massachusetts General Hospital research team has identified the specific function of a protein found in HIV and related viruses that, after slowing down viral spread in the earliest stages of infection, may help the virus survive later on by evading the immune response. (2019-01-10)
The science is clear: with HIV, undetectable equals untransmittable
An overwhelming body of clinical evidence has firmly established the HIV Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U) concept as scientifically sound. (2019-01-10)
Prescribed opioids raise risk of pneumonia in patients with and without HIV
Taking prescribed opioids raises the risk of pneumonia in individuals with and without HIV, a new Yale-led study finds. (2019-01-07)
Faulty immune receptor could be reason why many face HIV complications
Michigan State University scientists have discovered SLAMF7, an immune receptor, has the ability to tone down the body's immune response when activated on certain white blood cells, called 'monocytes.' The finding was made after studying both healthy and HIV-infected patients. (2019-01-07)
Comprehensive AIDS prevention programs in prisons: A review study
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health (Volume 6, Number 4, 2018; DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/FMCH.2018.0118: , Somayeh Zare et al. discuss how studies show that suitable design of educational programs can affect prisoners' awareness of AIDS. (2019-01-04)
The opioid crisis: What we should learn from the AIDS epidemic
There are important lessons to be learned from the successes and failures of the AIDS response that could inform our response to the opioid epidemic. (2019-01-03)
How to better reach men for HIV testing -- a randomized trial on incentives for self-testing
Providing pregnant women with HIV self-testing kits to pass along to their male partners can boost the partners' rate of HIV testing and entry into care, according to a research article published this week in PLOS Medicine by Augustine Choko of the Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Clinical Research Program, Malawi, and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and colleagues. (2019-01-02)
Community-based HIV testing effective in reaching undiagnosed populations, new study finds
Results from a PATH-led evaluation study in Vietnam demonstrate that HIV testing by lay providers is an effective approach to reach people at risk of HIV who have never been tested or test infrequently. (2018-12-31)
Cell size and cell-cycle states play key decision-making role in HIV
Thanks to the development of antiretroviral drugs, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is considered a manageable chronic disease today. (2018-12-26)
Pay-it-forward model increases STD testing among gay men in China
Chinese gay men who were offered a free STD test and then asked to donate to the testing of another man were 48 percent more likely to get tested than men offered the standard of care, UNC researchers found. (2018-12-20)
AIDS -- an approach for targeting HIV reservoirs
Current HIV treatments need to be taken for life by those infected as antiretroviral therapy is unable to eliminate viral reservoirs lurking in immune cells. (2018-12-20)
Uncovering a key mechanism in assembly of Avian Sarcoma Virus, a relative of HIV-1
Researchers used NMR to detail how the matrix domain of the Avian Sarcoma Virus Gag protein binds to certain phospholipids. (2018-12-18)
HIV vaccine protects non-human primates from infection
New research shows that an experimental HIV vaccine strategy works in non-human primates. (2018-12-14)
Johns Hopkins researchers examine testosterone use to increase BMD in HIV-infected men
A new study has shown that HIV-infected men had lower median bone mineral density (BMD) scores at the hip compared to HIV-uninfected men, and all men who received testosterone had significantly greater BMD scores at the lumbar spine. (2018-12-12)
Roadmap reveals shortcut to recreate key HIV antibody for vaccines
A team led by Duke Human Vaccine Institute researchers, publishing online Dec. (2018-12-11)
Researchers discover unique immune cell likely drives chronic inflammation
For the first time, researchers have identified that an immune cell subset called gamma delta T cells that may be causing and/or perpetuating the systemic inflammation found in normal aging in the general geriatric population and in HIV-infected people who are responding well to drugs (anti-retrovirals). (2018-12-11)
Infectivity of different HIV-1 strains may depend on which cell receptors they target
Distinct HIV-1 strains may differ in the nature of the CCR5 molecules to which they bind, affecting which cells they can infect and their ability to enter cells, according to a study published Dec. (2018-12-06)
Eliminating the latent reservoir of HIV
A new study suggests that a genetic switch that causes latent HIV inside cells to begin to replicate can be manipulated to completely eradicate the virus from the human body. (2018-12-06)
New research highlights why HIV-infected patients suffer higher rates of cancer
AIDS patients suffer higher rates of cancer because they have fewer T-cells in their bodies to fight disease. (2018-12-05)
Young black gay men have vastly higher HIV rates yet fewer partners
Young black men who have sex with men are 16 times more likely to have an HIV infection than their white peers, despite being less likely to have unsafe sex, reports a large, new study. (2018-12-04)
Genetic relic of the 'black death' may offer clues in treating liver disease
A gene mutation that is believed to have safeguarded some people in 14th century Europe from the bubonic plague today may be protecting HIV patients co-infected with hepatitis C from potentially fatal liver scarring, says a University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine physician-scientist. (2018-12-03)
Investigators discover compounds that block reactivation of latent HIV-1
A team of investigators from the University of Pittsburgh has identified compounds that block the reactivation of latent HIV-1 in a human cell line containing the latent virus. (2018-12-03)
Focus on resistance to HIV offers insight into how to fight the virus
Researchers have found that genetic mutations affecting the capsid, the structure surrounding the HIV genome, make it possible for a protein called TRIM5α to trigger the immune system of elite controllers. (2018-11-30)
Can a smart app encourage HIV-self testing in Canada?
HIV self-testing strategies have been recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) since 2016, as they empower people to find out HIV their status at their convenience. (2018-11-30)
HIV in liver cells found to be inactive, narrowing potential treatment targets
In a proof-of-principle study, researchers at Johns Hopkins revealed that certain immune system cells found in the human liver, called liver macrophages, contain only inert HIV and aren't likely to reproduce infection on their own in HIV-infected people on long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART). (2018-11-29)
Ending the HIV epidemic: Where does Europe stand?
From diagnosis of HIV to successful viral suppression: in a rapid communication published in Eurosurveillance today, ECDC and co-authors from Public Health England and The National AIDS Trust summarise the progress towards HIV elimination in 52 countries in Europe and Central Asia. (2018-11-29)
How HIV DNA is blocked from entering the cell nucleus
Multiple components of the nuclear pore complex and nuclear import machinery enable a protein called human myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) to inhibit HIV-1 infection, according to a study published Nov. (2018-11-29)
Meeting the challenge of engaging men in HIV prevention and treatment
A new commentary from National Institutes of Health scientists asserts that engaging men in HIV prevention and care is essential to the goal of ending the HIV pandemic. (2018-11-29)
New HIV diagnoses at high levels in the European Region but progress in EU
With nearly 160,000 new HIV diagnoses, 2017 marked another year of alarming numbers of HIV diagnoses in the WHO European Region. (2018-11-28)
Stigma impairs cognition in men living with HIV
A new study has drawn a direct link between the amount of stigma men with HIV report experiencing and their scores on cognitive tests, measuring abilities such as memory and attention. (2018-11-27)
Scripps Research scientists unveil promising new HIV vaccine strategy
A new candidate HIV vaccine from Scripps Research surmounts technical hurdles that stymied previous vaccine efforts, and stimulates a powerful anti-HIV antibody response in animal tests. (2018-11-26)
Patients with rare natural ability to suppress HIV shed light on potential functional cure
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified two patients with HIV whose immune cells behave differently than others with the virus and actually appear to help control viral load even years after infection. (2018-11-26)
ECDC issues integrated hepatitis and HIV testing Guidance
Targeted testing to reach those most at-risk of infection is an essential element of any strategy to eliminate viral hepatitis and HIV across the countries in the European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA). (2018-11-23)
Mobile health has power to transform HIV/AIDS nursing
The abundance of personal smartphones in southern African countries got University of Washington professor Sarah Gimbel thinking: What if these phones were used by front-line health workers -- namely nurses -- to collect and analyze data on patients living with HIV or AIDS to improve their care? (2018-11-21)
Negligible risk of transmitting HIV during sex when viral load is suppressed
There is a negligible risk of transmitting HIV during sex when a person living with HIV is on antiretroviral therapy and maintains a viral load under a specific threshold, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-11-19)
Sexual orientation identified as a risk factor in opioid misuse
Men and women who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual are more likely to misuse opioids when compared with those who identify as heterosexual, a new study shows. (2018-11-19)
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