Current Hormone News and Events

Current Hormone News and Events, Hormone News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Stress in pregnancy may influence baby brain development
Infants' brains may be shaped by levels of stress their mother experiences during pregnancy, a brain scanning study has revealed. (2020-11-24)

Study: gut hormones' regulation of fat production abnormal in obesity, fatty liver disease
Gut hormones play an important role in regulating fat production in the body. One key hormone, released a few hours after eating, turns off fat production by regulating gene expression in the liver, but this regulation is abnormal in obesity, researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign found in a new study. (2020-11-24)

Hormone found to switch off hunger could help tackle obesity
A hormone that can suppress food intake and increase the feeling of fullness in mice has shown similar results in humans and non-human primates, says a new study published today in eLife. (2020-11-24)

Early weight gain in children linked to ability to produce the hormone leptin
The brain controls weight by measuring levels of leptin in the blood, which is released by fat cells. In adults, leptin treatments have so far proved ineffective at treating obesity. New genetics research by scientists at the University of Copenhagen suggests that leptin plays a stronger role in controlling the weight of children than in adults. (2020-11-23)

Severe infections wreak havoc on mouse blood cell production
Severe infections like malaria cause short and long-term damage to precursor blood cells in mice, but some damage could be reversed, find researchers. (2020-11-23)

Prostate cancer: CRYM protein inhibits tumour growth
Prostate cancer is caused by elevated hormone levels, and tumours are generally treated using hormone therapy. A research team headed by Lukas Kenner of MedUni Vienna in collaboration with David Heery from the University of Nottingham/UK and Sarka Pospisilova and Suzanne Turner of the University of Brno/Czech Republic have shown that the protein μ-crystallin (CRYM) plays a significant part in tumour growth. The higher the levels of this protein that are present, the better the prognosis. (2020-11-18)

Lovestruck by oxytocin! Novel roles of the hormone in controlling male sexual function
Hormones are the master regulators of sexual functions in mammals. The hormone oxytocin has a well-established role in social bonding, sexual function, maternal instinct, nursing, and lactation. Researchers from Okayama University have now explored the roles of oxytocin in male sexual function for the first time. Findings from the study suggest that oxytocin-mediated control of male sexual function via the spinal cord may in fact be instrumental in treating erectile dysfunction. (2020-11-18)

Jacky dragon moms' time in the sun affects their kids
A new study conducted at the University of New South Wales and published in the November/December 2020 issue of Physiological and Biochemical Zoology sheds light on a possible connection between an animal's environmental conditions and the traits of its offspring. (2020-11-10)

Under-insured transgender americans turn to riskier sources for gender-affirming hormones
Transgender people who lack access to insurance coverage for gender-affirming hormone therapy are more likely to use hormones from sources other than a licensed prescriber, compared to those with insurance coverage. (2020-11-10)

Many transgender people who receive hormone therapy have unaddressed heart disease risks
Many transgender people who receive gender-affirming hormone therapy have heart disease and stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure and cholesterol, even during young adulthood. Of those known to have CVD risk factors, many were not previously treated to lower their heart disease risk. (2020-11-09)

When plants attack: parasitic plants use ethylene as a host invasion signal
Researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology have found that parasitic plants use the plant hormone ethylene as a signal to invade host plants. Parasitic plants make an organ called a haustorium to attach to and invade hosts, and to obtain water and nutrients. Ethylene is used by parasitic plants to tweak haustorium development and host invasion. This knowledge could be used to develop new ways to control a range of parasitic weeds. (2020-11-04)

Hormone differences
During birth, hormones in the body surge in both mother and baby, sent along by the nervous system. These stress hormones are there to spur delivery and to help a baby adapt to living outside the womb. A new study finds how one is born can have an effect on the amount of stress hormones released at the time of delivery. For example, vaginal delivery had the highest presence of birth signaling hormones. (2020-11-04)

Artificial night lighting has widespread impacts on nature
Artificial night-time lighting has a diverse range of effects across the natural world and should be limited where possible, researchers say. (2020-11-02)

Molecular compass for cell orientation
Plants have veins that transport nutrients through their body. These veins are highly organized. The hormone auxin travels directionally from cell-to-cell and provides cells with positional information, coordinating them during vein formation and regeneration. Scientists at IST Austria now discovered how cells translate auxin signals into forming a complex system of veins. This phenomenon also applies to wound healing and might lead to more mechanically resistant plants and further agricultural implications. (2020-10-29)

Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects of PFASs could depend on the presence of estrogen
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have received intense scrutiny in recent years because of their persistence in the environment and potential endocrine-disrupting effects. However, their estrogenic activities are controversial, with different studies showing apparently contradictory results. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have used a combination of laboratory experiments and computer modeling to reveal that PFASs can interact with the estrogen receptor in different ways to influence estrogen-controlled gene expression. (2020-10-28)

Adults with endocrine disorders have an increased risk of heart disease
All adults with endocrine disorders should be tested for high cholesterol and triglycerides to evaluate their risk of heart attack or stroke, according to a Clinical Practice Guideline issued today by the Endocrine Society. (2020-10-28)

Study finds over 80 percent of COVID-19 patients have vitamin D deficiency
Over 80 percent of 200 COVID-19 patients in a hospital in Spain have vitamin D deficiency, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-10-27)

A molecular break for root growth
The dynamic change in root growth of plants plays an important role in their adjustment to soil conditions. Depending on the location, nutrients or moisture can be found in higher or lower soil layers. This is why, depending on the situation, a short or a long root is advantageous. Caroline Gutjahr, Professor of Plant Genetics at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), and her team investigate how plant hormones influence the growth of roots. (2020-10-26)

Common liverwort study has implications for crop manipulation
A new study on genetic pathways in the common liverwort could have future implications for crop manipulation. (2020-10-26)

Fish exposed to even small amounts of estrogen produce fewer males
UC assistant professor Latonya Jackson conducted experiments with North American freshwater fish called least killifish. She found that fish exposed to estrogen in concentrations of 5 nanograms per liter in controlled lab conditions had fewer males and produced fewer offspring. Scientists have found estrogen at as much as 16 times that concentration in streams adjacent to sewage treatment plants. (2020-10-23)

Reduced hormone supply in pregnant mothers linked to ADHD in their children
Low levels of key, body-regulating chemicals in mothers during the first three months of pregnancy may interfere with the baby's brain development, a large American study shows. (2020-10-21)

Gut hormone blocks brain cell formation and is linked to Parkinson's dementia
A gut hormone, ghrelin, is a key regulator of new nerve cells in the adult brain, a Swansea-led research team has discovered. It could help pave the way for new drugs to treat dementia in patients with Parkinson's Disease. (2020-10-21)

COVID-19 patients with spinal fractures are twice as likely to die
Patients with COVID-19 and vertebral fractures are twice as likely to die from the disease, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-10-21)

COVID-19 pandemic drives innovation in diabetes care
The COVID-19 pandemic has jumpstarted innovation in health care delivery and allowed for real-world testing of diabetes care models in unprecedented ways, according to a manuscript published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-10-20)

New method allows more targeted measurement of thyroid hormone action in tissue
A team led by Michael Krebs from MedUni Vienna's Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism has now conducted a study to test the use of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS) to measure the effect in body tissue as well. They were able to identify certain phosphorus-containing compounds that are visible in NMRS as markers for thyroid hormone action in tissue. The study has been published in the prestigious ''Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism''. (2020-10-20)

USC study underscores the gut-brain connection, shows hunger hormone impacts memory
Rats that lacked the hormone ghrelin tended to eat more frequently and gained more weight. They also showed signs that they could not remember when they had last eaten. (2020-10-12)

Advanced prostate cancer has an unexpected weakness that can be targeted by drugs
Kanazawa University researchers reported that the SUCLA2 gene is frequently involved in the deletion of the tumor suppressor gene RB1 in advanced prostate cancer. RB1 deletion makes cells resistant to hormone therapy but SUCLA2 deletion induces a metabolic weakness. The study showed that thymoquinone selectively killed SUCLA2-deficient prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The findings highlight a vulnerability of advanced prostate cancer cells that can be targeted by drugs. (2020-10-07)

The effects of oxytocin on social anxiety depend on location, location, location
The findings of the study show that oxytocin produced in the BNST increases stress-induced social anxiety behaviors in mice. This may provide an explanation as to why oxytocin can sometimes have antisocial effects. (2020-10-07)

The plant hormone auxin may promote disease by regulating virulence gene expression
This work provides another example of how plant hormones can be used by microbes as an environmental cue, which seems to be emerging as a common strategy as scientists learn more about how pathogens and parasites sense their plant hosts. (2020-10-06)

New clues about the link between stress and depression
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a protein in the brain that is important both for the function of the mood-regulating substance serotonin and for the release of stress hormones, at least in mice. The findings, which are published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, may have implications for the development of new drugs for depression and anxiety. (2020-10-02)

The mode of detection of high-risk breast cancers is linked to patient prognosis
Breast cancers that are detected in the interval between national screening programme mammograms have a worse prognosis than those detected at the time of a screening, even if they have the same biology, according to research presented at the 12th European Breast Cancer Conference. (2020-10-02)

20-year research breakthrough offers new hope for breast cancer patients
A new treatment for breast cancer patients with hormone receptor (HR+) early stage disease who are at a high risk of recurrence has been shown to reduce the risk by 25%, according to a study led by The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust. (2020-09-29)

New hormone therapies for hot flashes offer enhanced benefits and minimized risk
Hormone therapy remains the best proven method for managing menopause symptoms such as hot flashes. Research continues, however, in the area to identify novel approaches to estrogen therapy that minimize any associated risks. Dr. Hugh Taylor from Yale School of Medicine will discuss some of the latest developments, including fetal estrogens, during the 2020 Pre-Meeting Symposium of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-09-28)

How hormone therapy slows progression of atherosclerosis
As one of the most common treatments for effectively managing menopause symptoms, hormone therapy (HT) is also known to provide multiple health benefits, including slowing the progression of atherosclerosis. A study based on Early Versus Late Intervention Trial With Estradiol (ELITE) data evaluated the underlying mechanism of such benefit and will be presented during the 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), opening on September 28. (2020-09-28)

ESMO 2020: Breast cancer drug set to transform prostate cancer treatment
A drug used to treat breast and ovarian cancer can extend the lives of some men with prostate cancer and should become a new standard treatment for the disease, concludes a major trial which is set to change clinical practice. (2020-09-20)

Study: Synthetic medication and desiccated thyroid equally effective to treat hypothyroidism
A study by researchers at Kaiser Permanente in Denver, Colorado evaluated the stability of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in patients using synthetic medication versus those using desiccated thyroid products to treat hypothyroidism. The results showed no difference in TSH stability over a three-year period between patients taking desiccated thyroid products and those on synthetic levothyroxine, an unanticipated finding given concerns about variability among batches of desiccated thyroid, which is prescribed much less frequently than synthetic levothyroxine. (2020-09-15)

Detection of PCBs and their metabolites (OH-PCBs) in the fetal brain of a Japanese macaque
This study selected the Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) as a model animal for the fetal transfer of OH-PCBs in humans, and revealed OH-PCB concentrations and their relationships in the maternal and fetal brains. The key finding from this study is that OH-PCBs can reach the developing brain of the fetus as early as the first trimester of pregnancy. These OH-PCBs may exceed the levels that induce adverse effects on neurodevelopment. (2020-09-14)

Ammonium triggers formation of lateral roots
Despite the importance of changes in root architecture to exploit local nutrient patches, mechanisms integrating external nutrient signals into the root developmental program remain poorly understood. ''Here, we show for the first time that local ammonium supply stimulates the accumulation of auxin in the root vasculature and promotes auxin diffusion and lateral root formation to build a highly branched root system'', says Prof. Nicolaus von Wirén from the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK). (2020-09-11)

Mutant tomato helps to crack the secrets of fruiting
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that fruit development in tomatoes rewires their central metabolism. The plant hormone gibberellin, which regulates major parts of plant development, triggers the process of fruiting. Using a mutant strain of tomato that is highly sensitive to gibberellin, the study showed that the central metabolism pathway in tomatoes was consistently rewired via gibberellin activity. These results could lead to new production strategies, such as breeding seedless fruit. (2020-09-10)

The neurons that connect stress, insomnia, and the immune system
Researchers have pinpointed the circuit in the brain that is responsible for sleepless nights in times of stress--and it turns out that circuit does more than make you toss and turn. Their study, done in mice, ties the same neuronal connections that trigger insomnia to a stress-induced weakening of the immune system. (2020-09-09)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.