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Current Human population News and Events

Current Human population News and Events, Human population News Articles.
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The genome of chimpanzees and gorillas could help to better understand human tumors
A new study by researchers from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE), a joint center of UPF and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), shows that, surprisingly, the distribution of mutations in human tumors is more similar to that of chimpanzees and gorillas than that of humans. (2020-05-21)
During pandemic stage of emerging pathogen, climate has modest impact compared to population suscept
In influencing the trajectory of the pandemic stage of an emerging pathogen, a population's susceptibility to a novel disease is more influential than climate factors like humidity. (2020-05-18)
In France, population immunity to SARS-CoV-2 at about 4.4% in may, modeling suggests
By May 11, when lockdown restrictions were eased in France, about 4.4% of the French population had been infected with SARS-CoV-2, a new modeling study suggests. (2020-05-13)
Modeling social distancing strategies for curbing the COVID-19 pandemic
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, a major unanswered question is how SARS-CoV-2 will persist in the human population after its initial pandemic stage. (2020-04-17)
COVID-19 critical care bed modelling study: potential shortage in Canada
A national modelling paper predicting the number of available ICU beds across Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic suggests that self-isolation will likely not be enough to keep demand from exceeding supply. (2020-04-08)
Celebrating our genomic diversity: Fine-scale differences in the Japanese population
The Japanese population has long been thought of as genetically homogeneous as a result of limited population mixing. (2020-03-26)
Earliest interbreeding event between ancient human populations discovered
The study documented the earliest known interbreeding event between ancient human populations-- a group known as the 'super-archaics' in Eurasia interbred with a Neanderthal-Denisovan ancestor about 700,000 years ago. (2020-02-20)
Schizophrenia genetics analyzed in South African Xhosa
Schizophrenia genetics was studied in the Xhosa population because Africa is the birthplace of all humans, yet ancestral African populations are rarely part of genetics research. (2020-01-30)
Genetics of schizophrenia in South African Xhosa informs understanding for all human populations
In the first genetic analysis of schizophrenia in an ancestral African population, the South African Xhosa, researchers report that individuals with schizophrenia are more likely to carry rare damaging genetic mutations than those who are well. (2020-01-30)
Study: Humanity's footprint is squashing world's wildlife
Using the most comprehensive dataset on the 'human footprint,' which maps the accumulated impact of human activities on the land's surface, researchers from WCS, University of Queensland, and other groups found intense human pressures across the range of a staggering 20,529 terrestrial vertebrate species. (2020-01-13)
Certain steps help lead to healthy pregnancies in women with rheumatoid arthritis
For women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), taking certain steps to ensure that they have a healthy pregnancy leads to a reduced risk of complicated birth or miscarriage, according to a study in Arthritis Care & Research. (2020-01-08)
Understanding why songbirds choose their homes
New research by University of Alberta biologists uses a new approach to modelling the populations of six species of songbirds in Canada's boreal forest -- and the results show that standard modeling methods may not be accurately capturing species distribution patterns. (2019-12-19)
Limiting global warming would relieve populations from wet and dry extremes in China
Scientists find that heavy precipitation events would intensify with global warming all over China, affecting all the populations around. (2019-12-17)
Even resilient common species are not immune to environmental crisis
A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore has found that the effective population size and genetic diversity of Singapore's Cynopterus brachyotis, believed to remain widely unaffected by urbanisation, has shrunk significantly over the last 90 years - revealing that the current biodiversity crisis may be much broader than widely assumed, affecting even species thought to be common and tolerant of fragmentation and habitat loss. (2019-12-17)
Climate change and human activities threatens picky penguins
Eating a krill-only diet has made one variety of Antarctic penguin especially susceptible to the impacts of climate change, according to new research involving the University of Saskatchewan (USask) which sheds new light on why some penguins are winners and others losers in their rapidly changing ecosystem. (2019-12-02)
Whales stop being socialites when boats are about
The noise and presence of boats can harm humpback whales' ability to communicate and socialise, in some cases reducing their communication range by a factor of four. (2019-11-28)
Special cells contribute to regenerate the heart in Zebrafish
It is already known that zebrafish can flexibly regenerate their hearts after injury. (2019-10-23)
Genome study shows that iran's population is more heterogeneous than previously believed
An international research endeavour has provided a genome-wide genetic characterization of the Iranian population, enabling further research on genetic diseases and historical migration movements / Publication in 'PLOS Genetics' (2019-09-24)
Improved mapping of Swedish genes from 1,000 individuals
People -- or more specifically just Swedes -- are more like chimpanzees than previously known. (2019-09-24)
Human activity likely affects giraffe's social networks
In a new Ethology study, researchers examined information on two adjacent giraffe populations in Kenya to determine whether human activities and high predation affect their social networks. (2019-08-07)
BU researcher asks, 'is it time for another contraception revolution?'
In an effort to protect the planet and preserve its natural treasures for future generations, another contraception revolution that provides options for populations not currently being served by modern contraception may be the answer according to a Perspective in this week's New England Journal of Medicine. (2019-07-31)
Environmental destruction linked to African population raises questions about family sizes
Africa is projected to be home to nearly 3 billion people by 2100, but rapid population growth will cause widespread environmental degradation unless effective family planning becomes widespread policy, according to new research that tracked increased population pressures on the continent's ecosystems. (2019-06-26)
The ancient history of Neandertals in Europe
Parts of the genomes of two ~120,000-year-old Neandertals from Germany and Belgium have been sequenced at the MPI for Evolutionary Anthropology. (2019-06-26)
Ancient DNA analysis adds chapter to the story of neanderthal migrations
After managing to obtain DNA from two 120,000-year-old European Neandertals, researchers report that these specimens are more genetically similar to Neandertals that lived in Europe 80,000 year later than they are to a Neandertal of similar age found in Siberia. (2019-06-26)
Education trumps age-structure in terms of providing a demographic dividend
The relationship between population changes and economic growth has been a controversial topic among demographers for many years. (2019-06-10)
Leopard coral grouper: Overexploited
Researchers measured the population stock in Saleh Bay, Indonesia of the commercially valuable leopard coral grouper (Plectropomus leopardus), a species subject to population collapse due to high fishing pressure. (2019-06-06)
Counting the uncounted
Though abundance is a fundamental measure in ecology and environmental management, detecting all individuals in a population is usually impossible when monitoring, so estimates of abundance must account for imperfect detection. (2019-06-06)
DeepMind's new gamer AI goes 'for the win' in multiplayer first-person video games
DeepMind researchers have taught artificially intelligent gamers to play a popular 3D multiplayer first-person video game with human-like skills -- a previously insurmountable task. (2019-05-30)
Why can't we all get along (like Namibia's pastoralists and wildlife?)
Scientists interviewed pastoralists in Namibia's Namib Desert to see how they felt about conflicts with wildlife, which can include lions and cheetahs preying on livestock and elephants and zebras eating crops. (2019-05-02)
Gulf killifish adapts to pollution with help of gene exchange with non-native cousin
The Gulf killifish of Galveston Bay, Texas, was both nearly doomed to local extinction by humans transforming its home to a toxic soup, and also rescued by humans -- through their accidental introduction of an invasive fish genetically armed with pollution-resistant traits. (2019-05-02)
Discovery of 'kingpin' stem cell may help in the understanding of cancerous tumors
Bhatia's team spent more than six years delving down to the cellular level to examine what they say are previously overlooked cells that form on the edges of pluripotent stem cell colonies. (2019-04-11)
Study offers insight into biological changes among invasive species
A remote island in the Caribbean could offer clues as to how invasive species are able to colonise new territories and then thrive in them, a new study by the University of Plymouth suggests. (2019-04-08)
Digging ancient signals out of modern human genomes
Trying to find ancient DNA, let alone prove that the ancient DNA is ancestral to a population living today, is extremely challenging. (2019-04-05)
The decline of state-level IVC filter utilization
National inferior vena cava (IVC) filter utilization in the Medicare population has declined over the last decade according to a prior Harvey L. (2019-04-04)
Human activity disrupting iconic African ecosystem, Syracuse biologist finds
A Syracuse University researcher has confirmed that Africa's Serengeti-Mara ecosystem -- one of the largest, most protected on Earth -- may be imperiled, due to increased human activity at its border. (2019-04-01)
Origin of Scandinavian wolves clarified
There are no signs that hybrids of dog and wolf have contributed to the Scandinavian wolf population -- a matter that has been discussed, especially in Norway. (2019-03-29)
Human activity quickly killing cultural diversity of the chimpanzee
The impact human activities have on the cultural behaviors and traditions of our closest relative, the chimpanzee, is drastic, reports a new study -- one based on an unprecedented data set of nearly 150 African chimpanzee communities. (2019-03-07)
Method assesses health and size of lizard populations
Monitoring programs that survey many wildlife species at the same time across large geographic regions are important for informing conservation decisions, but reptiles are often missing from these efforts because they are difficult to survey. (2019-02-21)
Choosy amphipods
Amphipods of the species Gammarus roeselii guard their chosen mates, often carrying them with them for days and defending them against potential rivals. (2019-02-07)
Bee dispersal ability may influence conservation measures
The abilities of various bee species to disperse influences the pattern of their population's genetic structure, which, in turn, can constrain how they respond to environmental change, as reported by an international team of researchers. (2019-02-07)
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