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Current Humor News and Events

Current Humor News and Events, Humor News Articles.
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Research finds deployment affects mental health of veterans differently
As the largest study of its kind, more than 212,000 men and women Army active duty personnel completed a questionnaire that measured different psychological characteristics before deployment and after returning from combat. (2020-06-17)
Candidates who use humor on Twitter may find the joke is on them
Political candidates' use of humor on social media could sometimes backfire on them with potential supporters, new research suggests. (2020-06-15)
Behaviors and traits that influence social status, according to evolutionary psychologists
Beyond fame and fortune, certain traits and behaviors may have pervasive influence in climbing the social ladder, according to a study by evolutionary psychologists at The University of Texas at Austin. (2020-06-02)
UTEP study examines COVID-19 stress, coping strategies, and well-being
Emre Umucu, Ph.D., assistant professor of rehabilitation counseling, and Beatrice Lee, an incoming rehabilitation counseling faculty member, examined the perceived stress levels and coping mechanisms related to COVID-19, and how coping affects well-being in people with self-reported chronic conditions and disabilities. (2020-05-29)
Comedy club performances provide insights on how robots, humans connect via humor
A robot comic is more funny when it has good timing. (2020-05-18)
Monty Python's silly walk: A gait analysis and wake-up call to peer review inefficiencies
Fifty years ago, Monty Python's famous sketch, 'The Ministry of Silly Walks,' first aired. (2020-03-12)
Blood and sweat: Wearable medical sensors will get major sensitivity boost
Scientists explain how to increase the sensitivity of biosensors to the point where they can be integrated into smartphones, smart watches, and other wearable devices. (2020-02-13)
Penn Medicine uses social media-style memes and gifs to encourage staff recognition
A study found that the Penn 'High Five' system is used by the vast majority of the team where it was first launched. (2019-12-10)
New technology makes internet memes accessible for people with visual impairments
People with visual impairments use social media like everyone else, often with the help of screen reader software. (2019-11-26)
Money spent on beer ads linked to underage drinking
Advertising budgets and strategies used by beer companies appear to influence underage drinking, according to new research. (2019-11-18)
Eye on research: A new way to detect and study retinoblastoma
Dr. Jesse Berry of Children's Hospital Los Angeles advances the field of retinoblastoma research through her discovery and use of aqueous humor biopsy. (2019-11-04)
Flagging false Facebook posts as satire helps reduce belief
If you want to convince people not to trust an inaccurate political post on Facebook, labeling it as satire can help, a new study finds. (2019-10-08)
The Mathematikado: A math-inspired parody of a parody
In 1886, female students at Vassar College put on a parody of the opera 'The Mikado' by Gilbert and Sullivan. (2019-09-10)
Laugh tracks make 'dad jokes' funnier
Many people complain about television shows that use recorded laugh tracks. (2019-07-22)
Veterans suffer from 'culture shock' when returning to university
War veterans experience such extreme 'culture shock' at university, that they struggle to communicate their feelings and begin a destructive cycle of silence, according to a new study. (2019-04-25)
Facebook memes during 2016 presidential election differ from gender stereotypes
Facebook political memes of Donald Trump in the 2016 election were more likely to focus on his hairstyle and facial expressions, while those of Hillary Clinton were more likely to center on the email scandal and her relationships -- a contrast to historical gender stereotypes in politics, a Baylor University study has found. (2019-01-28)
Obese mice lose anxiety when 'zombie cells' exit their brain
Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators have shown in mice that obesity increases the level of 'zombie' or senescent cells in the brain, and that those cells, in turn, are linked to anxiety. (2019-01-03)
As married couples age, humor replaces bickering
Honeymoon long over? Hang in there. A new University of California, Berkeley, study shows those prickly disagreements that can mark the early and middle years of marriage mellow with age as conflicts give way to humor and acceptance. (2018-12-03)
Psychological science can make your meetings better
Meetings are the bane of office life for many professionals but they don't have to be. (2018-11-09)
New study offers hope for patients suffering from a rare form of blindness
A new form of therapy may halt or even reverse a form of progressive vision loss that, until now, has inevitably led to blindness. (2018-11-01)
Can chiropractic care disrupt vision?
For those in the habit of getting their neck adjusted by a chiropractor, there's an interesting case from Kellogg Eye Center to know about: High velocity neck manipulation has been shown to create stress on the eye and lead to spotty vision. (2018-10-01)
Funny bone: ASU survey finds 99 percent of science students appreciate instructor humor
In a first-of-its-kind study published today in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers from Arizona State University found that students appreciate when instructors tell jokes in science class, but that female and male students differ in what topics they find funny or offensive. (2018-08-15)
Injection of vasoactive intestinal peptide into the eye improves corneal transplant survival
A new study in The American Journal of Pathology reports for the first time that injection of neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) directly into the eye of mice enhanced corneal graft survival. (2018-08-07)
Study explores the down side of being dubbed 'class clown'
Being dubbed the class clown by teachers and peers has negative social repercussions for third-grade boys that may portend developmental and academic consequences for them, University of Illinois recreation, sport and tourism professor Lynn A. (2018-05-01)
Researchers find new way of exploring the afterglow from the Big Bang
Researchers have developed a new way to improve our knowledge of the Big Bang by measuring radiation from its afterglow, called the cosmic microwave background radiation. (2018-04-19)
No laughing matter, yet humor inspires climate change activism
Melting icecaps, mass flooding, megadroughts and erratic weather are no laughing matter. (2018-03-01)
New directions found in understanding, fighting glaucoma
Two distinctive handfuls of short molecules that regulate gene expression have been found in the eye fluid of patients with two distinct types of vision degenerating glaucoma. (2018-02-26)
Self-defeating humor promotes psychological well-being, study reveals
Researchers from the University of Granada provide new data on the consequences of using different styles of humor, emphasizing the importance of analyzing cultural differences in future psychological research. (2018-02-08)
New 'Buck' naked barley: Food, feed, brew
Researchers are giving an ancient grain a new life: 'Buck' barley is naked, but not in an indecent way. (2018-01-17)
Thinking about germs makes people concerned about how they look
People who worry a lot about germs appear also to be especially concerned about their physical appearance, a new study shows. (2017-12-18)
A liquid biopsy for retinoblastoma
A recent study by a team of investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Keck Medicine of USC, provides proof of concept for a safe and effective way to derive genetic information from a retinoblastoma tumor. (2017-10-12)
How eyes get clogged in glaucoma and how to free them
IBS biologists find an explanation for the increase in intraocular pressure in glaucoma and a promising therapeutic option to rejuvenate the eye. (2017-09-18)
Booty, booby and nitwit: Academics reveal funniest words
Booty, booby and nitwit are officially some of the funniest words in the English language, according to new peer-reviewed research by the University of Warwick. (2017-08-01)
Judging moral character: A matter of principle, not good deeds
According to new research by Berkeley-Haas Assoc. Prof. Clayton Critcher, people evaluate others' moral character -- being honest, principled, and virtuous -- not simply by their deeds, but also by the context that determines how such decisions are made. (2017-05-03)
Sexist and anti-gay jokes: It's all about men feeling threatened
Why do some men crack sexist and anti-gay jokes or find them funny, while others do not? (2017-04-20)
Do patients want complementary and alternative treatments and will they pay cash for them?
While complementary, alternative, and integrative medicine treatments such as acupuncture and massage therapy are usually offered in outpatient settings, a new study has shown that the majority of hospitalized patients perceived such integrative services to be helpful. (2017-03-27)
Can quantum theory explain why jokes are funny?
In a recent paper published in Frontiers in Physics, researchers are taking the first steps towards of a quantum theory model of humor, to explain what really happens on the cognitive level in the moment when we 'get the joke.' (2017-03-17)
How to fit in when you stand out: Don't try so hard
When in Rome you do as the Romans do, right? (2017-03-13)
Those funny ads may make you laugh, but maybe not buy
Two equally funny advertisements can have very different effects on consumers' brand attitudes, depending on how humor is used, University of Arizona research shows. (2016-12-01)
The eye has it: Vitreous gel could hold clues to visual impairment
Research is underway at Rochester Institute of Technology that will give scientists a better understanding of the vitreous humor, or gel, that fills the eye and could lead to advances in the treatment of vision disorders, drug delivery and eye surgery. (2016-11-23)
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