Current Hydraulic fracturing News and Events

Current Hydraulic fracturing News and Events, Hydraulic fracturing News Articles.
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The unique hydraulics in the Barbegal water mills, the world's first industrial plant
The Barbegal watermills in southern France are a unique complex dating back to the 2nd century AD. The construction with 16 waterwheels is, as far as is known, the first attempt in Europe to build a machine complex on an industrial scale. A team of scientists has now gained new knowledge about the construction and principle of the water supply to the mills in Barbegal. (2020-11-13)

A 40-year-old catalyst unveils its secrets
Activity of the industrial catalyst TS-1 relies on titanium pairs / important discovery for catalyst development (2020-11-02)

New fault zone measurements could help us to understand subduction earthquake
University of Tsukuba researchers have conducted detailed structural analyses of a fault zone in central Japan to identify the specific conditions that lead to devastating earthquake. The seismic slip processes that were inferred based on the measurements may be applicable to other subduction zones, such as those below the oceans. The gathered data could be applied in future attempts to describe or model the subduction earthquakes that lead to ground shaking and tsunami risk. (2020-10-30)

Unusually shallow earthquake ruptures in Chinese fracking field
An unusually shallow earthquake triggered by hydraulic fracturing in a Chinese shale gas field could change how experts view the risks of fracking for faults that lie very near the Earth's surface. (2020-10-07)

Is your drinking water toxic? This app may help you find out
Since fracking sites use a diverse mix of chemical ingredients, often individuals and researchers are in the dark about the health consequences of living near a particular well. Now, a new, interactive tool created by Penn Medicine researchers allows community members and scientists to find out which toxins may be lurking in their drinking water. (2020-09-22)

Deep underground forces explain quakes on San Andreas Fault
Rock-melting forces occurring much deeper in the Earth than previously understood drive tremors along a segment of the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, Calif., new USC research shows. (2020-09-04)

What factors influence the likelihood of fracking-related seismicity in Oklahoma?
The depth of a hydraulic fracturing well in Oklahoma, among other factors, increases the probability that fracking will lead to earthquake activity, according to a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2020-07-21)

Skoltech scientists use ML to optimize hydraulic fracturing design for oil wells
Skoltech researchers and their industry colleagues have created a data-driven model that can forecast the production from an oil well stimulated by multistage fracturing technology. This model has high commercialization potential, and its use can boost oil production via optimized fracturing design. (2020-07-16)

Study of natural gas flaring finds high risks to babies
Researchers from USC and UCLA have found that exposure to flaring -- the burning off of excess natural gas -- at oil and gas production sites is associated with 50% higher odds of preterm birth, compared with no exposure. (2020-07-15)

Two-thirds of Americans think government should do more on climate
A new Pew Research Center report examining U.S. views of climate change and other environmental issues, including attitudes toward expanding renewable energy and the federal government's response to climate change. (2020-06-23)

Oil forecasting technique adapted for spreadsheets may cut shale operator costs
Porous rock containing oil and natural gas are buried so deep inside the earth that shale operators rely on complex models of the underground environment to estimate fossil fuel recovery. These simulations are notoriously complex, requiring highly-skilled operators to run them. These factors indirectly impact the cost of shale oil production and ultimately, how much consumers pay for their fuel. (2020-06-22)

Stanford study shows dry air drives overlooked changes in how plants drink and breathe
New research suggests dry air combined with warmer temperatures may prompt bigger than expected changes in how water moves through plants. The adjustment may allow plants to survive with less water in future droughts, while downshifting how much carbon they absorb. (2020-06-01)

Technology is studied that could save 12% of the energy used in pressurized irrigation
A study, performed in two Andalusian provinces, analyzed the potential of producing electricity by means of recovering hydraulic energy by implanting new technology based on pumps working as turbines (2020-05-27)

UToledo chemists identify toxic chemicals in fracking wastewater
The research scientists of the new Dr. Nina McClelland Laboratory for Water Chemistry and Environmental Analysis at UToledo created a new method that simultaneously identified 201 chemical compounds in fracking wastewater, called produced water. (2020-05-26)

Machine-learning tool could help develop tougher materials
Engineers develop a rapid screening system to test fracture resistance in billions of potential materials. (2020-05-20)

Chilean scientists warn environmental costs of water roads
The interdisciplinary analysis presented this in Nature Sustaintability by researchers from four Chilean universities, recommends a global analysis in the design of these projects, reconciling the growing demand for water supply with the health of freshwater and marine ecosystems. (2020-05-02)

Marine litter in the Bay of Biscay
The scientific journal 'Marine Pollution Bulletin' has just published 'Microplastics in the Bay of Biscay: an overview', a piece of work by the 'Materials+Technologies' research group (GMT) of the Faculty of Engineering - Gipuzkoa. It is the first scientific paper that analyses all the research studies conducted until now about the presence of microplastics in the Bay of Biscay. It includes the results obtained in various marine compartments (water bodies, marine sediments and biota) highlighting the limitations and challenges to knowledge that have been found. (2020-04-30)

Fracking and earthquake risk
Earthquakes caused by hydraulic fracturing can damage property and endanger lives. Stanford researchers have developed new guidelines for when to slow or halt fracking operations based on local risks. (2020-04-27)

Fracking chemical may interfere with male sex hormone receptor
A chemical used in hydraulic fracturing, commonly called fracking, has the potential to interfere with reproductive hormones in men, according to research accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, and publication in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2020-03-31)

Dams in the upper Mekong River modify nutrient bioavailability downstream
Chen et al. shed new light on the effects of hydropower dams on nutrient cycling and ecosystem functioning. The study on the cascade reservoirs along the upper Mekong River demonstrated that hydropower reservoirs increased downstream bioavailability of nitrogen and phosphorus, stimulated phytoplankton abundance and shifted the dominant species from diatoms in the silicon-rich upstream channel to green algae in downstream reservoirs. (2020-03-17)

Injection strategies are crucial for geothermal projects
The fear of earthquakes is one of the main reasons for reservations about geothermal energy. In order to get hot water from the depths, crevices in the rock underground often have to be created. This is done by injecting large quantities of water under high pressure. The problem is that such hydraulic stimulation is accompanied by vibrations in the underground, known as ''induced seismicity''. A new study from the now points a way that could help to reduce the seismic risk. (2020-03-10)

Paper: Disposal of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing poses dangers to drivers
A new paper co-written by Yilan Xu, a professor of agricultural and consumer economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, shows that the growing traffic burden in shale energy boomtowns from trucks hauling wastewater to disposal sites resulted in a surge of road fatalities and severe accidents. (2020-03-02)

Water reuse could be key for future of hydraulic fracturing
Enough water will come from the ground as a byproduct of oil production from unconventional reservoirs during the coming decades to theoretically counter the need to use fresh water for hydraulic fracturing operations in many of the nation's large oil-producing areas. While other industries might want to recycle some of that water for their own needs, water quality issues and the potential costs involved may be prohibitive. (2020-02-20)

The catalyst that removes CO2 and produces hydrocarbons
Water is split into hydrogen and oxygen by electrolysis, but if CO2 is also added to the mixture, compounds can be generated to make textiles, diapers and even spirits. American scientists, led by a Spaniard, have developed a catalyst that accelerates this reaction, while also removing a greenhouse gas. (2020-02-14)

Shale drilling activity linked to increased sexually transmitted infections in Texas, Yale study
Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have found that rates of two sexually transmitted infections (STIs), gonorrhea and chlamydia, are 15% and 10% higher, respectively, in Texas counties with high shale drilling activity (''fracking''), compared to counties without any fracking. (2020-02-13)

UTA study examines potential sources of groundwater contamination in private wells
A study led by environmental researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington suggests a disconnect between the perception of groundwater contamination and the extent to which that contamination is attributable to oil and natural gas extraction. (2020-02-06)

Bending diamond at the nanoscale
A team of Australian scientists has discovered diamond can be bent and deformed, at the nanoscale at least. The discovery opens up a range of possibilities for the design and engineering of new nanoscale devices in sensing, defence and energy storage but also shows the challenges that lie ahead for nanotechnologies. (2020-02-05)

Extreme weather conditions can tax urban drainage systems to the max
During a typical Canadian winter, snow accumulation and melt--combined with sudden rainfalls--can lead to bottlenecks in storm drains that can cause flooding. With that in mind, researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus have been examining urban stormwater drainage systems, and they too have concerns about the resilience of many urban drainage systems (2020-02-04)

Effects of natural gas assessed in study of shale gas boom in Appalachian basin
A new study estimated the cumulative effects of the shale gas boom in the Appalachian basin in the early 2000s on air quality, climate change, and employment. The study found that effects on air quality and employment followed the boom-and-bust cycle, but effects on climate change will likely persist for generations to come. The study, which also considered how to compensate for these effects, provides insights for long-term decision making in this field. (2019-12-17)

OSIRIS-REx cameras capture particle ejection from asteroid Bennu
Cameras aboard NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft captured close-up shots of material being ejected from the surface of the near-Earth asteroid Bennu. The images offer a detailed look at small-scale mass loss events on an active asteroid, whereas before, observations have been limited to only the largest phenomena. (2019-12-05)

NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission explains Bennu's mysterious particle events
Shortly after NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft arrived at asteroid Bennu, an unexpected discovery by the mission's science team revealed that the asteroid could be active, or consistently discharging particles into space. (2019-12-05)

Seismologists see future in fiber optic cables as earthquake sensors
Each hair-thin glass fiber in a buried fiber optic cable contains tiny internal flaws -- and that's a good thing for scientists looking for new ways to collect seismic data in places from a busy urban downtown to a remote glacier. (2019-12-04)

BU finds potentially harmful air contamination near new Bedford Harbor
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study indicates that the contaminated water of New Bedford Harbor may pose an airborne health hazard for residents living nearby in Acushnet, Dartmouth, Fairhaven, and New Bedford. (2019-12-03)

US public views on climate and energy
Majorities of Americans say the federal government is doing too little for key aspects of the environment. And most believe the US should focus on development of alternative sources of energy over expansion of fossil fuels, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. (2019-11-25)

Theoretical tubulanes inspire ultrahard polymers
Rice University engineers print 3D blocks based on theoretical tubulanes and find they're nearly as hard as diamond. (2019-11-13)

Crystal coatings could help solve mystery of fracture patterns
A research group led by The University of Texas at Austin is challenging the current scientific paradigm by arguing that mechanics alone is not enough. To make progress on fracture research, scientists need to start considering the role of chemistry. (2019-11-13)

Severity of earthquake impact may change with the seasons, study shows
The devastating impact caused by earthquakes on the local communities and environment could differ in severity depending on the season a pioneering new study on two historic earthquakes in Kazakhstan has suggested. (2019-11-12)

Oil and gas wastewater used for irrigation may suppress plant immune systems
A new Colorado State University study gives pause to the idea of using oil and gas wastewater for irrigation. The CSU team conducted a greenhouse study using produced water to irrigate common wheat crops. Their study, published in Environmental Science and Technology Letters, showed that these crops had weakened immune systems. (2019-10-31)

Reframing Antarctica's meltwater pond dangers to ice shelves and sea level
On Antarctica, meltwater ponds riddle a kilometer-thick, 10,000-year-old ice shelf, which shatters just weeks later. The collapse shocks scientists and unleashes the glacier behind the ice shelf, driving up sea level. A new study puts damage by meltwater ponds to ice shelves and the ensuing threat to sea level into cool, mathematical perspective. (2019-10-25)

Thousands of meltwater lakes mapped on the east Antarctic ice sheet
The number of meltwater lakes on the surface of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is more significant than previously thought, according to new research. (2019-09-26)

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