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Current Hydrogel News and Events

Current Hydrogel News and Events, Hydrogel News Articles.
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Smart windows that self-illuminate on rainy days
A joint research team from POSTECH and KAIST develops self-powering, color-changing humidity sensors. (2020-05-28)
Combinatorial screening approach opens path to better-quality joint cartilage
High-throughput platform identifies complex conditions with biomaterial compositions, and mechanical and chemical stimuli that help stem cells produce more robust cartilage. (2020-05-22)
Direct control of dendritic cells for tracking and immune modulation
Dendritic cells patrol the body for invaders and activate T cells and natural killer cells to attack them, making them crucial players in keeping cancer and other diseases at bay. (2020-05-18)
Lighting the path for cells
ETH researchers have developed a new method in which they use light to draw patterns of molecules that guide living cells. (2020-05-12)
A great new way to paint 3D-printed objects
Rutgers engineers have created a highly effective way to paint complex 3D-printed objects, such as lightweight frames for aircraft and biomedical stents, that could save manufacturers time and money and provide new opportunities to create ''smart skins'' for printed parts. (2020-04-28)
A new way to cool down electronic devices, recover waste heat
Using electronic devices for too long can cause them to overheat, which might slow them down, damage their components or even make them explode or catch fire. (2020-04-22)
Penn Engineering's new scavenger technology allows robots to 'eat' metal for energy
New research from the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science is bridging the gap between batteries and energy harvesters like solar panels. (2020-04-21)
Impulse for research on fungi
For the first time, the cells of fungi can also be analysed using a relatively simple microscopic method. (2020-04-08)
Harnessing the power of electricity-producing bacteria for programmable 'biohybrids'
Someday, microbial cyborgs -- bacteria combined with electronic devices -- could be useful in fuel cells, biosensors and bioreactors. (2020-04-08)
Engineers 3D print soft, rubbery brain implants
MIT engineers are working on developing soft, flexible neural implants that can gently conform to the brain's contours and monitor activity over longer periods, without aggravating surrounding tissue. (2020-03-30)
(Re)generation next: Novel strategy to develop scaffolds for joint tissue regeneration
In Japan, an increase in the aging population has exacerbated the demand for regenerative medicine to address increasingly common diseases, such as knee osteoarthritis. (2020-03-30)
OSU research paves way to improved cleanup of contaminated groundwater
Beads that contain bacteria and a slow-release food supply to sustain them can clean up contaminated groundwater for months on end, maintenance free. (2020-03-25)
Adjusting processing temperature results in better hydrogels for biomedical applications
Biohydrogels have been studied closely for their potential use in biomedical applications, but they often move between sols and gels, depending on their temperature, changes that can pose issues depending on the intended use. (2020-03-24)
Powering devices goes skin deep
A way to remotely charge batteries through flesh could help develop components for permanent implantable medical devices. (2020-03-08)
Handheld 3D printers developed to treat musculoskeletal injuries
Biomedical engineers at the UConn School of Dental Medicine recently developed a handheld 3D bioprinter that could revolutionize the way musculoskeletal surgical procedures are performed. (2020-02-27)
Shining a new light on biomimetic materials
Researchers have merged optical, chemical and materials sciences to utilize light to control the local dynamic behavior within a hydrogel, much like the ability of the iris and pupil in the eye to dynamically respond to incoming light. (2020-02-24)
Active droplets
Using a mixture of oil droplets and hydrogel, medical active agents can be not only precisely dosed, but also continuously administered over periods of up to several days. (2020-02-20)
Smart contact lens sensor developed for point-of-care eye health monitoring
A research group led by Prof. DU Xuemin from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has developed a ''smart'' contact lens that can show real-time changes in moisture and pressure by altering colors. (2020-02-18)
A new way to monitor cancer radiation therapy doses
More than half of all cancer patients undergo radiation therapy and the dose is critical. (2020-02-15)
Low-cost 'smart' diaper can notify caregiver when it's wet
MIT researchers have developed a ''smart'' diaper embedded with a moisture sensor that can alert a caregiver when a diaper is wet. (2020-02-14)
Capillary shrinkage triggers high-density porous structure
The capillary shrinkage of graphene oxide hydrogels was investigated to illustrate the relationship between the surface tension of the evaporating solvent and the associated capillary force, which was released by Quan-Hong Yang et al. in Science China Materials. (2020-02-13)
A thermometer can be stretched and crumpled by water
Prof. Taiho Park and his research team developed a flexible ionic conductor that is water-processable and thermal stable. (2020-02-10)
Controlling light with light
Researchers from Harvard have developed a new platform for all-optical computing, meaning computations done solely with beams of light. (2020-02-05)
First-of-its-kind hydrogel platform enables on-demand production of medicines, chemicals
A team of chemical engineers has developed a new way to produce medicines and chemicals on demand and preserve them using portable ''biofactories'' embedded in water-based gels called hydrogels. (2020-02-04)
New hydrogels wither while stem cells flourish for tissue repair
Recently, a type of biodegradable hydrogel, dubbed microporous annealed particle (MAP) hydrogel, has gained much attention for its potential to deliver stem cells for body tissue repair. (2020-02-04)
SUTD's novel approach allows 3D printing of finer, more complex microfluidic networks
The biomedical industry, involving the engineering of complex tissue constructs and 3D architecture of blood vessels, is one of the key industries to benefit from SUTD's new development. (2020-01-30)
SUTD develops revolutionary reversible 4D printing with research collaborators
Researchers from SUTD worked with NTU to revolutionise 4D printing by making a 3D fabricated material change its shape and back again repeatedly without electrical components (2020-01-29)
Robot sweat regulates temperature, key for extreme conditions
Just when it seemed like robots couldn't get any cooler, Cornell University researchers have created a soft robot muscle that can regulate its temperature through sweating. (2020-01-29)
Self-moisturising smart contact lenses
Researchers at Tohoku University have developed a new type of smart contact lenses that can prevent dry eyes. (2020-01-22)
Ingestible medical devices can be broken down with light
MIT engineers have developed a light-sensitive material that allows gastrointestinal devices to be triggered to break down inside the body when they are exposed to light from an ingestible LED. (2020-01-17)
Structual color barcode micromotors for multiplex biosensing
A novel micromotors with obvious structural color was proposed by Professor Yuanjin Zhao, et al. (2020-01-16)
Lights on for germ-free wound dressings
Infections are a dreaded threat that can have fatal consequences after an operation, in the treatment of wounds, and during tissue engineering. (2020-01-16)
Bacteria and sand engineered into living concrete
Cement and concrete haven't changed much as technology in over a hundred years, but researchers in Colorado are revolutionizing building materials by literally bringing them to life. (2020-01-15)
Skin-like sensors bring a human touch to wearable tech
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have developed a super-stretchy, transparent and self-powering sensor that records the complex sensations of human skin. (2020-01-08)
Next generation wound gel treats and prevents infections
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a new hydrogel based on the body's natural peptide defense. (2020-01-08)
Researchers create functional mini-liver by 3D bioprinting
Technique developed at Human Genome and Stem Cell Research Center, funded by FAPESP and hosted by the University of São Paulo, produced hepatic tissue in the laboratory in only 90 days and could become an alternative to organ transplantation in future. (2019-12-17)
Hydrogels control inflammation to help healing
Researchers test a sampling of synthetic, biocompatible hydrogels to see how tuning them influences the body's inflammatory response. (2019-12-16)
Researchers create accurate model of organ scarring using stem cells in a lab
A team led by Dr. Brigitte Gomperts at UCLA has developed a 'scar in a dish' model that uses multiple types of cells derived from human stem cells to closely mimic the progressive scarring that occurs in human organs. (2019-12-10)
Improved pH probes may help towards cancer treatments
Nanopipettes with zwitterionic membranes may offer improved monitoring of changes in pH surrounding living cells, which can indicate traits of invasive cancer cells and their response to treatment, report researchers at Kanazawa University in Nature Communications. (2019-12-06)
Bio-inspired hydrogel can rapidly switch to rigid plastic
A new material that stiffens 1,800-fold when exposed to heat could protect motorcyclists and racecar drivers during accidents. (2019-12-03)
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