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Current Hydrogel News and Events

Current Hydrogel News and Events, Hydrogel News Articles.
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"Stretching rack" for cells
The behavior of cells is controlled by their environment, physical factors such as pressure or tension have an effect. (2020-09-25)
Injectable hydrogel could someday lead to more effective vaccines
Vaccines have curtailed the spread of several infectious diseases, such as smallpox, polio and measles. (2020-09-16)
Next-gen organoids grow and function like real tissues
Bioengineers at EPFL have created miniature intestines in a dish that match up anatomically and functionally to the real thing better than any other lab-grown tissue models. (2020-09-16)
Tiny biological package gets drug right to the 'heart' of transplant rejection
For patients who receive a heart transplant in the near future, the old adage, 'Good things come in small packages,' may become words to live by. (2020-09-03)
Coaxing single stem cells into specialized cells
Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have developed a unique method for precisely controlling the deposition of hydrogel, which is made of water-soluble polymers commonly used to support cells in experiments or for therapeutic purposes. (2020-09-03)
Novel alkaline hydrogel advances skin wound care
Effective wound care requires the maintenance of optimal conditions for skin and tissue regeneration. (2020-08-26)
Less is more: A soft, self-actuated pump to simplify mechatronic devices
As electromechanical devices become increasingly small and complex, the high number of required components becomes a limiting factor. (2020-08-25)
Superfast o-phthalaldehyde/N-nucleophile cross-linking strategy for biomedical hydrogels
Recently, Prof. Xuesi Chen and colleagues at the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, proposed a new crosslinking strategy based on the condensation reaction between o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) and N-nucleophiles for hydrogel formation. (2020-08-20)
A smart eye mask that tracks muscle movements to tell what 'caught your eye'
Integrating first-of-its-kind washable hydrogel electrodes with a pulse sensor, researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst have developed smart eyewear to track eye movement and cardiac data for physiological and psychological studies. (2020-08-20)
UMass Amherst scientists invent new sensing eye mask
From the team that invented physiology-sensing pajamas at UMass Amherst, now comes a new, lightweight eye mask that can unobtrusively capture pulse, eye movement and sleep signals, for example, when worn in an everyday environment. (2020-08-20)
Heart attack damage reduced by shielded stem cells
Bioengineers and surgeons from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have shown in rodents that a four-week shielded stem cell treatment can reduce damage caused by a heart attack. (2020-08-18)
Improving treatment of spinal cord injuries
A group led by UC Riverside bioengineering professor Victor G. (2020-08-12)
Swallowing this colonoscopy-like bacteria grabber could reveal secrets about your health
Your gut bacteria could say a lot about you, such as why you're diabetic or how you respond to certain drugs. (2020-08-12)
Hydrogel paves way for biomedical breakthrough
Dubbed the ''invisibility cloak'', engineers at the University of Sydney have developed a hydrogel that allows implants and transplants to better and more safetly interact with surrounding tissue. (2020-08-03)
Computational gene study suggests new pathway for COVID-19 inflammatory response
A team led by Dan Jacobson of the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used the Summit supercomputer at ORNL to analyze genes from cells in the lung fluid of nine COVID-19 patients compared with 40 control patients. (2020-07-28)
Hydrogel mimics human brain with memorizing and forgetting ability
Hokkaido University researchers have found a soft and wet material that can memorize, retrieve, and forget information, much like the human brain. (2020-07-27)
How smart, ultrathin nanosheets go fishing for proteins
An interdisciplinary team from Frankfurt and Jena has developed a kind of bait with which to fish protein complexes out of mixtures. (2020-07-20)
Gel that breaks down, puts itself back together could improve delivery of oral drugs
An emerging hydrogel material with the capacity to degrade and spontaneously reform in the gastrointestinal tract could help researchers develop more effective methods for oral drug delivery. (2020-07-16)
New bioink for cell bioprinting in 3D
A research group led by Daniel Aili, associate professor at Linköping University, has developed a bioink to print tissue-mimicking material in 3D printers. (2020-07-13)
Biosynthetic sustainable hierarchical solar steam generator
Nowadays, a team led by Prof. Shu-Hong Yu from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) report an efficient and sustainable biomimetic hierarchical solar steam generator (HSSG) based on bacterial cellulose (BC) nanocomposites. (2020-07-08)
From the lab, the first cartilage-mimicking gel that's strong enough for knees
The thin, slippery layer of cartilage between the bones in the knee is magical stuff: strong enough to withstand a person's weight, but soft and supple enough to cushion the joint against impact, over decades of repeat use. (2020-06-26)
Research brief: New discovery allows 3D printing of sensors directly on expanding organs
In groundbreaking new research, mechanical engineers and computer scientists at the University of Minnesota have developed a 3D printing technique that uses motion capture technology, similar to that used in Hollywood movies, to print electronic sensors directly on organs that are expanding and contracting. (2020-06-17)
Diabetic mice improve with retrievable millimeter-thick cell-laden hydrogel fiber
Researchers from The University of Tokyo developed a novel fiber-shaped hydrogel transplant for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. (2020-06-15)
Lightning in a (nano)bottle: new supercapacitor opens door to better wearable electronics
Researchers from Skoltech, Aalto University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have designed a high-performance, low-cost, environmentally friendly, and stretchable supercapacitor that can potentially be used in wearable electronics (2020-06-11)
Research reveals insights into bioprinted skeletal muscle tissue models
SUTD collaborates with NTU to provide in-depth analysis of 3D in vitro biomimetic skeletal muscle tissue models, highlighting the great potential of bioprinting technology. (2020-06-09)
Researchers developing quick and simple method of glyphosate detection
Glyphosate is a very widely used herbicide. It is suspected to be carcinogenic, which is why a quick, low-cost method for detecting glyphosate would be highly beneficial. (2020-06-08)
Smart windows that self-illuminate on rainy days
A joint research team from POSTECH and KAIST develops self-powering, color-changing humidity sensors. (2020-05-28)
Combinatorial screening approach opens path to better-quality joint cartilage
High-throughput platform identifies complex conditions with biomaterial compositions, and mechanical and chemical stimuli that help stem cells produce more robust cartilage. (2020-05-22)
Direct control of dendritic cells for tracking and immune modulation
Dendritic cells patrol the body for invaders and activate T cells and natural killer cells to attack them, making them crucial players in keeping cancer and other diseases at bay. (2020-05-18)
Lighting the path for cells
ETH researchers have developed a new method in which they use light to draw patterns of molecules that guide living cells. (2020-05-12)
A great new way to paint 3D-printed objects
Rutgers engineers have created a highly effective way to paint complex 3D-printed objects, such as lightweight frames for aircraft and biomedical stents, that could save manufacturers time and money and provide new opportunities to create ''smart skins'' for printed parts. (2020-04-28)
A new way to cool down electronic devices, recover waste heat
Using electronic devices for too long can cause them to overheat, which might slow them down, damage their components or even make them explode or catch fire. (2020-04-22)
Penn Engineering's new scavenger technology allows robots to 'eat' metal for energy
New research from the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science is bridging the gap between batteries and energy harvesters like solar panels. (2020-04-21)
Impulse for research on fungi
For the first time, the cells of fungi can also be analysed using a relatively simple microscopic method. (2020-04-08)
Harnessing the power of electricity-producing bacteria for programmable 'biohybrids'
Someday, microbial cyborgs -- bacteria combined with electronic devices -- could be useful in fuel cells, biosensors and bioreactors. (2020-04-08)
Engineers 3D print soft, rubbery brain implants
MIT engineers are working on developing soft, flexible neural implants that can gently conform to the brain's contours and monitor activity over longer periods, without aggravating surrounding tissue. (2020-03-30)
(Re)generation next: Novel strategy to develop scaffolds for joint tissue regeneration
In Japan, an increase in the aging population has exacerbated the demand for regenerative medicine to address increasingly common diseases, such as knee osteoarthritis. (2020-03-30)
OSU research paves way to improved cleanup of contaminated groundwater
Beads that contain bacteria and a slow-release food supply to sustain them can clean up contaminated groundwater for months on end, maintenance free. (2020-03-25)
Adjusting processing temperature results in better hydrogels for biomedical applications
Biohydrogels have been studied closely for their potential use in biomedical applications, but they often move between sols and gels, depending on their temperature, changes that can pose issues depending on the intended use. (2020-03-24)
Powering devices goes skin deep
A way to remotely charge batteries through flesh could help develop components for permanent implantable medical devices. (2020-03-08)
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