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Current Hydropower News and Events

Current Hydropower News and Events, Hydropower News Articles.
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Using mountains for long-term energy storage
The storage of energy for long periods of time is subject to special challenges. (2019-11-11)
Concordia research shows how climate change will affect hydropower production in Canada
Changing climate and weather patterns are going to have dramatic impacts on Canada's production potential of hydroelectricity, according to new Concordia research. hydropower giant Quebec will see its hydroelectricity output potential jump by as much as 15%. (2019-11-07)
Solar and wind energy preserve groundwater for drought, agriculture
A Princeton University-led study in Nature Communications is among the first to show that solar and wind energy not only enhance drought resilience, but also aid in groundwater sustainability. (2019-11-06)
Switching to solar and wind will reduce groundwater use
IIASA researchers explored optimal pathways for managing groundwater and hydropower trade-offs for different water availability conditions as solar and wind energy start to play a more prominent role in the state of California. (2019-11-06)
Putting the Water Framework Directive to the test
The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) is one of the most progressive regulatory frameworks for water management worldwide. (2019-10-29)
Study champions inland fisheries as rural nutrition hero
Researchers from MSU and the FAO synthesize new data and assessment methods to show how freshwater fish feed poor rural populations in many areas of the world. (2019-09-26)
New Mersey designs show tidal barriers bring more benefits than producing clean energy
When designed holistically, tidal barrage schemes can provide additional transport links for commuters, become tourism destinations, mitigate wildlife habitat loss, as well as provide opportunities to boost people's health and wellbeing with additional options for cycling and walking, say researchers from Lancaster University and the University of Liverpool. (2019-09-24)
AI helps reduce Amazon hydropower dams' carbon footprint
A team of scientists has developed a computational model that uses artificial intelligence to find sites for hydropower dams in order to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. (2019-09-19)
A catalyst for sustainable methanol
Scientists at ETH Zurich and oil and gas company Total have developed a new catalyst that converts CO2 and hydrogen into methanol. (2019-07-29)
Mountain-dwellers can adapt to melting glaciers without caring about climate change
For many people, climate change feels like a distant threat -- something that happens far away, or far off in the future. (2019-06-10)
New study in Nature: Just one-third of the world's longest rivers remain free-flowing
Infrastructure development and other man-made changes have already fragmented or disrupted two-thirds of Earth's longest rivers. (2019-05-08)
Scientists study fish to learn how to adapt to the impacts of climate change
Freshwater biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and nature-based solutions which increase the resilience of ecological communities are becoming increasingly important in helping communities prepare for the unavoidable effects of climate change. (2019-03-19)
Renewable energy won't make Bitcoin 'green,' but tweaking its mining mechanism might
The cryptocurrency Bitcoin is known for its energy footprint. Now, researcher Alex de Vries, from PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) in the Netherlands, suggests that renewable hydropower production cannot supply the large quantities of energy needed to power machinery used to validate Bitcoin transactions. (2019-03-14)
CCNY's Nir Krakauer in monsoon research breakthrough
With average precipitation of 35 inches per four-month season over an area encompassing most of the Indian subcontinent, the South Asia summer monsoon is intense, only partly understood, and notoriously difficult to predict. (2019-02-22)
Paper: Carbon taxes could create new winners and losers among countries
A global carbon tax would create new sets of economic winners and losers, with some countries holding a distinct competitive advantage over others, says new research from Don Fullerton, a Gutgsell Professor of Finance at Illinois and a scholar at the Institute of Government and Public Affairs. (2019-02-19)
Study: Environmental regulations may have unintended consequences in energy production
Many countries have passed environmental laws to preserve natural ecosystems. (2019-02-04)
Social and environmental costs of hydropower are underestimated, study shows
Study shows that deforestation, loss of biodiversity and economic damage done to communities living near dams have not been factored into the cost of these projects. (2019-01-10)
Droughts boost emissions as hydropower dries up
Recent droughts caused increases in emissions of carbon dioxide and harmful air pollutants from power generation in several western states as fossil fuels came online to replace hampered hydroelectric power. (2018-12-21)
A damming trend
Hundreds of dams are being proposed for Mekong River basin in Southeast Asia. (2018-12-14)
Study: Damning evidence of dam's impacts on rainforest birds
A study by an international team of conservation scientists found that a dam built in Thailand 31 years ago has caused the local bird population to collapse. (2018-12-07)
Widespread decrease in wind energy resources found over the Northern Hemisphere
A new study focusing on the change in wind energy resources and models' simulation ability over the Northern Hemisphere reveals a widespread decline in wind energy resources over the Northern Hemisphere. (2018-12-05)
New research questions fish stocking obligations
Fish stocking as a fisheries compensation method in hydropower operations no longer meets latest legal and scientific requirements, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. (2018-11-30)
Hydropower, innovations and avoiding international dam shame
For sweeping drama, it's hard to beat hydropower from dams -- a renewable source of electricity that helped build much of the developed world. (2018-11-05)
Yangtze dams put endangered sturgeon's future in doubt
Before the damming of the Yangtze River in 1981, Chinese sturgeon swam freely each summer one after another into the river's mouth, continuing upriver while fasting all along the way. (2018-11-01)
Study examines pros and cons of hydropower
Hydropower can generate electricity without emitting greenhouse gases but can cause environmental and social harms, such as damaged wildlife habitat, impaired water quality, impeded fish migration, reduced sediment transport, and diminished cultural and recreation benefits of rivers. (2018-09-06)
It is all about the distribution
Wind turbines could cover 40 percent of the current electricity consumption in Germany. (2018-09-05)
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2018
These are ORNL story tips: Residents' shared desire for water security benefits neighborhoods; 3-D printed molds for concrete facades promise lower cost, production time; ORNL engineered the edges of structures in 2-D crystals; chasing runaway electrons in fusion plasmas; new tools to understand U.S. waterways and identify potential hydropower sites; and better materials for 3-D printed permanent magnets could last longer, perform better. (2018-08-01)
When and where did the drought occur severely in the Yellow River basin during the last 55 years?
Drought is one of the severe natural disasters to impact human society and occurs widely and frequently in China. (2018-06-04)
Land under water: Estimating hydropower's land use impacts
One of the key ways to combat global climate change is to boost the world's use of renewable energy. (2018-03-15)
Study says Mekong River dams could disrupt lives, environment
The Mekong River traverses six Southeast Asian countries and supports the livelihoods of millions of people. (2018-03-08)
Greenhouse gas emissions of hydropower in the Mekong River Basin can exceed fossil fuel sources
Hydropower is commonly considered as a clean energy source to fuel Southeast Asian economic growth. (2018-03-05)
Wind and solar power could meet four-fifths of US electricity demand, study finds
The United States could reliably meet about 80 percent of its electricity demand with solar and wind power generation, according to scientists at the University of California, Irvine; the California Institute of Technology; and the Carnegie Institution for Science. (2018-02-27)
Avoiding blackouts with 100% renewable energy
Researchers propose three separate ways to avoid blackouts if the world transitions all its energy to electricity or direct heat and provides the energy with 100 percent wind, water and sunlight. (2018-02-08)
The influence of hydropower dams on river connectivity in the Andes Amazon
Hydropower dams in the Andes Amazon significantly disturb river connectivity in this region, and consequently, the many natural and human systems these rivers support, according a new study. (2018-01-31)
Small hydroelectric dams increase globally with little research, regulations
University of Washington researchers have published the first major assessment of small hydropower dams around the world -- including their potential for growth -- and highlight the incredibly variability in how dams of varying sizes are categorized, regulated and studied. (2018-01-22)
New hope for critically endangered Myanmar snub-nosed monkey
Scientists and conservation teams from Fauna & Flora International (FFI), Dali University and the German Primate Center just published a comprehensive conservation status review of one of the world's most threatened primate species, the critically endangered Myanmar snub-nosed monkey (also known affectionately as the 'snubby' by scientists, and as the black snub-nosed monkey in China), Rhinopithecus strykeri. (2018-01-16)
Hydropower dams can be managed without an all-or-nothing choice between energy and food
Nearly 100 hydropower dams are planned for construction along tributaries off the Mekong River's 2,700-mile stretch. (2017-12-07)
An unexpected way to boost fishery yields using dams
A new study based on the Mekong River basin, home to one of the largest freshwater fisheries in the world, reveals particular dam flow patterns that could be harnessed to boost food production -- by up to nearly four-fold compared to un-dammed ecosystems. (2017-12-07)
Are elevated levels of mercury in the American dipper due to run-of-river dams?
A study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry used American dippers to determine if run-of-river (RoR) dams altered food webs and mercury levels at 13 stream sites in British Columbia. (2017-11-01)
Among 'green' energy, hydropower is the most dangerous
Many governments are promoting a move away from fossil fuels towards renewable energy sources. (2017-10-25)
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