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Current Ice sheet News and Events

Current Ice sheet News and Events, Ice sheet News Articles.
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How saving the ozone layer in 1987 slowed global warming
It may have been an accidental side effect but new research shows that when the world's nations signed the Montreal Protocol in 1987 to ban CFCs and save the ozone layer they also signed an agreement that has already done more to slow global warming than the Kyoto Protocol. (2019-12-06)
Can Arctic 'ice management' combat climate change?
According to a much-debated geo-engineering approach, both sea-ice retreat and global warming could be slowed by using millions of wind-powered pumps, drifting in the sea ice, to promote ice formation during the Arctic winter. (2019-12-05)
The impact of molecular rotation on a peculiar isotope effect on water hydrogen bonds
Quantum nature of hydrogen bonds in water manifests itself in peculiar physicochemical isotope effects: while deuteration often elongates and weakens hydrogen bonds of typical hydrogen-bonded systems composed of bulky constituent molecules, it elongates but strengthens hydrogen bonds of water molecular aggregates. (2019-12-02)
Evidence: Antarctica's thinning ice shelves causing more ice to move from land into sea
New study provides the first evidence that thinning ice shelves around Antarctica are causing more ice to move from the land into the sea. (2019-12-02)
Sweet potato uses a single odor to warn its neighbors of insect attack
A single volatile substance can be sufficient to induce a defense response in sweet potatoes to herbivores. (2019-12-02)
Sustaining roads with grape and agricultural waste
The US spends $5 billion a year to repair damages to road infrastructure from winter snow and ice control operations and the use of traditional deicers. (2019-12-02)
Drone images show Greenland ice sheet becoming more unstable as it fractures
The world's second-largest ice sheet, and the single largest contributor to global sea-level rise, is potentially becoming unstable because of fractures developing in response to faster ice flow and more meltwater forming on its surface. (2019-12-02)
McGill-led research unravels mystery of how early animals survived ice age
How did life survive the most severe ice age? A McGill University-led research team has found the first direct evidence that glacial meltwater provided a crucial lifeline to eukaryotes during Snowball Earth, when the oceans were cut off from life-giving oxygen, answering a question puzzling scientists for years. (2019-12-02)
Throwing cold water on ice baths: Avoid this strategy for repairing or building muscle
New research suggests that ice baths aren't helpful for repairing and building muscle over time, because they decrease the generation of protein in muscles. (2019-12-02)
Antarctic ice sheets could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought
Antarctica is the largest reservoir of ice on Earth -- but new research by the University of South Australia suggests it could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought. (2019-12-01)
The Eurasian continent remembers and amplifies cold waves as the Arctic warms
Cold waves triggered by sea ice loss in the Arctic are memorized in the Eurasian Continent, amplifying cooling in the winters to follow, according to a joint research team between Hokkaido University and Niigata University in Japan. (2019-11-29)
Nine climate tipping points now 'active,' warn scientists
More than half of the climate tipping points identified a decade ago are now 'active,' a group of leading scientists have warned. (2019-11-27)
Animals could help humans monitor oceans
Sharks, penguins, turtles and other seagoing species could help humans monitor the oceans by transmitting oceanographic information from electronic tags. (2019-11-27)
Novel tactile display using computer-controlled surface adhesion
Touch surfaces have become ubiquitous and enable users to intuitively manipulate the displayed contents with their fingers. (2019-11-25)
Two million-year-old ice cores provide first direct observations of an ancient climate
Princeton University-led researchers have extracted 2 million-year-old ice cores from Antarctica -- the oldest yet recovered -- that provide the first direct observations of prehistoric atmospheric conditions and temperatures. (2019-11-21)
Nature's secret recipe for making leaves
The secret recipe nature uses to make the diverse leaf shapes we see everywhere around us has been revealed in research. (2019-11-21)
Icebergs as a source of nutrients
The importance of icebergs as an important source of nutrients in the polar regions has long been discussed. (2019-11-20)
Vanishing ice puts reindeer herders at risk
Mongolia's Tsaatan reindeer herders depend on munkh mus, or eternal ice, for their livelihoods. (2019-11-20)
Exoplanet axis study boosts hopes of complex life, just not next door
There's new hope that we aren't alone in the universe, that advanced beings may exist on exoplanets. (2019-11-19)
Study on surface damage to vehicles traveling at hypersonic speeds
Vehicles moving at hypersonic speeds are bombarded with ice crystals and dust particles in the surrounding atmosphere, making the surface material vulnerable to damage such as erosion and sputtering with each tiny collision. (2019-11-19)
Pollution from Athabasca oil sands affects weather processes
Scientists have been looking at pollution affecting the air, land and water around the Athabaska Oil Sands for some time. (2019-11-18)
First evidence of the impact of climate change on Arctic Terns
New study shows how changes in Antarctic sea ice is driving one of the world's smallest seabirds to forage further for food. (2019-11-18)
A one-way street for light
Light can be directed in different directions, usually also back the same way. (2019-11-14)
Going with the floe: Sea ice movements trace dynamics transforming the new Arctic
UC Riverside-led research is the first to use MODIS satellite imagery to understand long-term ocean movements from sea ice dynamics. (2019-11-14)
Chemists map an artificial molecular self-assembly pathway with complexities of life
Two pathways diverged in a chemical synthesis, and one molecule took them both. (2019-11-14)
Last Arctic ice refuge is disappearing
The oldest and thickest Arctic sea ice is disappearing twice as fast as ice in the rest of the Arctic Ocean, according to new research. (2019-11-12)
What future do emperor penguins face?
Emperor penguins establish their colonies on sea ice under extremely specific conditions. (2019-11-12)
Turbulence creates ice in clouds
Vertical air motions increase ice formation in mixed-phase clouds. This correlation was predicted theoretically for a long time, but could now be observed for the first time in nature. (2019-11-08)
Biology: Artic sea ice loss may facilitate disease spread in marine mammals
Artic sea ice reduction due to climate change may allow pathogens infecting sea mammals to spread more regularly between the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2019-11-07)
Melting arctic sea ice linked to emergence of deadly virus in marine mammals
Scientists have linked the decline in Arctic sea ice to the emergence of a deadly virus that could threaten marine mammals in the North Pacific, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. (2019-11-07)
Unless warming is slowed, emperor penguins will be marching towards extinction
Emperor penguins are some of the most striking and charismatic animals on Earth, but a new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has found that a warming climate may render them extinct by the end of this century. (2019-11-07)
Why is ice so slippery
The answer lies in a film of water that is generated by friction, one that is far thinner than expected and much more viscous than usual water through its resemblance to the 'snow cones' of crushed ice we drink during the summer. (2019-11-05)
Changes in high-altitude winds over the South Pacific produce long-term effects
In the past million years, the high-altitude winds of the southern westerly wind belt, which spans nearly half the globe, didn't behave as uniformly over the Southern Pacific as previously assumed. (2019-11-05)
Just 15 years of post-Paris emissions to lock in 20 cm of sea level rise in 2300: study
Unless governments significantly scale up their emission reduction efforts, the 15 years' worth of emissions released under their current Paris Agreement pledges alone would cause 20 cm of sea-level rise over the longer term, according to new research published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by researchers at Climate Analytics and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). (2019-11-04)
Sea levels to continue rising after Paris agreement emission pledges expire in 2030
Sea levels will continue to rise around the world long after current carbon emissions pledges made through the Paris climate agreement are met and global temperatures stabilize, a new study indicates. (2019-11-04)
Scientists probe the limits of ice
The smallest nanodroplet of water in which ice can form is only as big as 90 water molecules -- a tenth the size of the smallest virus. (2019-11-04)
Parasite manipulates algal metabolism for its own benefit
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology and the universities of Jena and Frankfurt show that a pathogenic fungus alters the metabolism of its host unicellular algae, for its own purposes: the small bioactive substances that are formed in the process benefit the fungi's own propagation while preventing the algae from proliferating. (2019-10-30)
Drones help map Iceland's disappearing glaciers
Dr. Kieran Baxter from the University of Dundee has created composite images that compare views from 1980s aerial surveys to modern-day photos captured with the help of state-of-the-art technology. (2019-10-30)
Two million-year-old ice provides snapshot of Earth's greenhouse gas history
Two million-year old ice from Antarctica recently uncovered by a team of researchers provides a clearer picture into the connections between greenhouse gases and climate in ancient times and will help scientists understand future climate change. (2019-10-30)
Reframing Antarctica's meltwater pond dangers to ice shelves and sea level
On Antarctica, meltwater ponds riddle a kilometer-thick, 10,000-year-old ice shelf, which shatters just weeks later. (2019-10-25)
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