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Current Ice sheet News and Events, Ice sheet News Articles.
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Greenland ice sheet meltwater can flow in winter, too
Liquid meltwater can sometimes flow deep below the Greenland Ice Sheet in winter, not just in the summer, according to CIRES-led work published in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters today. (2020-04-09)
Ancient teeth from Peru hint now-extinct monkeys crossed Atlantic from Africa
Four fossilized monkey teeth discovered deep in the Peruvian Amazon provide new evidence that more than one group of ancient primates journeyed across the Atlantic Ocean from Africa. (2020-04-09)
A rapidly changing Arctic
A new study by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and their international colleagues found that freshwater runoff from rivers and continental shelf sediments are bringing significant quantities of carbon and trace elements into parts of the Arctic Ocean via the Transpolar Drift--a major surface current that moves water from Siberia across the North Pole to the North Atlantic Ocean. (2020-04-08)
Thanks to 'flexoskeletons,' these insect-inspired robots are faster and cheaper to make
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new method that doesn't require any special equipment and works in just minutes to create soft, flexible, 3D-printed robots. (2020-04-08)
Neutron research: Magnetic monopoles detected in Kagome spin ice systems
Magnetic monopoles are actually impossible. At low temperatures, however, certain crystals can contain so-called quasi-particles that behave like magnetic monopoles. (2020-04-07)
Researchers discover pressure-induced polyamorphism in dense SO2
Recently, a team of Chinese scientists and their collaborators at the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science examined polyamorphism in the molecular substance SO2. (2020-04-06)
The Arctic may influence Eurasian extreme weather events in just two to three weeks
Scientists argue that the effects of rising temperatures and melting ice in the Arctic may actually be felt across the rest of the planet in a matter of weeks, but more robust, observational-based analysis is needed to fully understand how quickly Arctic events impact the rest of Earth. (2020-04-02)
Experiments lead to slip law for better forecasts of glacier speed, sea-level rise
Backed by experimental data from a laboratory machine that simulates the huge forces involved in glacier flow, glaciologists have written an equation that accounts for the motion of ice that rests on the soft, deformable ground underneath unusually fast-moving parts of ice sheets. (2020-04-02)
New 'law' to explain how glaciers flow over soft ground
Addressing a major source of uncertainty in glacier-flow models, researchers present a new slip law to describe glaciers sliding on soft, deformable material. (2020-04-02)
A sensational discovery: Traces of rainforests in West Antarctica
An international team of researchers led by geoscientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have now provided a new and unprecedented perspective on the climate history of Antarctica. (2020-04-01)
Traces of ancient rainforest in Antarctica point to a warmer prehistoric world
Researchers have found evidence of rainforests near the South Pole 90 million years ago, suggesting the climate was exceptionally warm at the time. (2020-04-01)
New discovery: Evidence for a 90-million-year-old rainforest near the South Pole
Researchers have found unexpected fossil traces of a temperate rainforest near the South Pole 90 million years ago, suggesting the continent had an exceptionally warm climate in prehistoric times. (2020-04-01)
Unique structural fluctuations at ice surface promote autoionization of water molecules
Hydrated protons at the surface of water ice are of fundamental importance in a variety of physicochemical phenomena on earth and in the universe. (2020-03-30)
Seafloor of Fram Strait is a sink for microplastic from Arctic and North Atlantic Ocean
Working in the Arctic Fram Strait, scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have found microplastic throughout the water column with particularly high concentrations at the ocean floor. (2020-03-27)
Less ice, more methane from northern lakes: A result from global warming
Shorter and warmer winters lead to an increase in emissions of methane from northern lakes, according to a new study by scientists in Finland and the US. (2020-03-26)
The Caucasus without a cap
Global warming has caused the total area of more than 600 Greater Caucasus glaciers to drop by approximately 16%, according to an international research team that includes Stanislav Kutuzov, geographer from HSE University. (2020-03-26)
How stable is deep ocean circulation in warmer climate?
If circulation of deep waters in the Atlantic stops or slows due to climate change, it could cause cooling in northern North America and Europe - a scenario that has occurred during past cold glacial periods. (2020-03-26)
East Antarctica's Denman Glacier has retreated almost 3 miles over last 22 years
East Antarctica's Denman Glacier has retreated 5 kilometers, nearly 3 miles, in the past 22 years, and researchers at the University of California, Irvine and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are concerned that the shape of the ground surface beneath the ice sheet could make it even more susceptible to climate-driven collapse. (2020-03-23)
Greenland shed ice at unprecedented rate in 2019; Antarctica continues to lose mass
In a new study in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters, scientists from the University of California, Irvine and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory describe Greenland's loss of 600 billion tons of ice in the summer of 2019, raising global sea levels by 2.2 millimeters in a short time. (2020-03-18)
Increasingly mobile sea ice risks polluting Arctic neighbors
The movement of sea ice between Arctic countries is expected to significantly increase this century, raising the risk of more widely transporting pollutants like microplastics and oil, according to new research from CU Boulder. (2020-03-18)
Seeing with electrons: Scientists pave the way to more affordable and accessible cryo-EM
In recent years, a powerful technology called cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM), where flash-frozen samples are embedded in glass-like ice and probed by an electron beam, has revolutionized biomolecule imaging. (2020-03-17)
New research first to relate Antarctic sea ice melt to weather change in tropics
While there is a growing body of research showing how the loss of Arctic sea ice affects other parts of the planet, a new study is the first to also consider the long-range effect of Antarctic sea ice melt. (2020-03-16)
Mysterious bone circles made from the remains of mammoths reveal clues about Ice Age
Mysterious bone circles made from the remains of dozens of mammoths have revealed clues about how ancient communities survived Europe's ice age. (2020-03-16)
Mercury's 400 C heat may help it make its own ice
Despite Mercury's 400 C daytime heat, there is ice at its caps, and now a study shows how that Vulcan scorch probably helps the planet closest to the sun make some of that ice. (2020-03-13)
A new record of deglaciations in last million years shows persistent role of obliquity pacing
Over the last million years, small variations in Earth's orbit continued to trigger and terminate global glaciations, throughout and after the Mid-Pleistocene Transition, according to a new study, which presents a novel high-resolution record of the last 11 deglaciations. (2020-03-12)
What causes an ice age to end?
Research by an international team helps to resolve some of the mystery of why ice ages end by establishing when they end. (2020-03-12)
Deciphering disorder
Researchers have combined experimental and theoretical techniques to measure atomic positions of all the atoms in a 2D material and calculate how the arrangement impacts the electronic properties of various regions of the system. (2020-03-11)
New flood damage framework helps planners prepare for sea-level rise
Princeton researchers have developed a new framework allowing urban planners and policymakers to consider a combination of responses to sea-level rise and, if hard structures, how high these protections should be built, depending on their tolerance for risk and the projected financial losses to a particular area due to flooding. (2020-03-11)
Magic twist angles of graphene sheets identified
Graphene is 200 times stronger than steel and can be as much as 6 times lighter. (2020-03-11)
HKU paleontologists discover solid evidence of formerly elusive abrupt sea-level jump
Meltwater pulses (MWPs) known as abrupt sea-level rise will inevitably affect cities especially those on coastal plains of low elevation. (2020-03-10)
Radar and ice could help detect an elusive subatomic particle
A new study published today in the journal Physical Review Letters shows, for the first time, an experiment that could detect a class of ultra-high-energy neutrinos using radar echoes. (2020-03-06)
First real-time observation of the chaos within 3D liquid crystals
A new study offers the opportunity to watch dynamic 3D liquid crystal systems and the chaotic motion within that until now have largely been studied through theory and simulations. (2020-03-05)
FSU researchers find newly uncovered Arctic landscape plays important role in carbon cycle
As the ice sheet covering most of Greenland retreats, Florida State University researchers are studying the newly revealed landscape to understand its role in the carbon cycle. (2020-03-05)
Almost alien: Antarctic subglacial lakes are cold, dark and full of secrets
More than half of the planet's fresh water is in Antarctica. (2020-03-04)
How a magnet could help boost understanding of superconductivity
Physicists have unraveled a mystery behind the strange behavior of electrons in a ferromagnet, a finding that could eventually help develop high temperature superconductivity. (2020-03-04)
Whether horseradish flea beetles deter predators depends on their food plant and their life stage
Horseradish flea beetles use glucosinolates from their host plants for their own defense. (2020-03-02)
Study shows rapid sea level rise along Atlantic coast of North America in 18th century
Sea levels along a stretch of the Atlantic coast of North America in the 18th century were rising almost as fast as in the 20th century, a new study has revealed. (2020-02-28)
Antarctic ice walls protect the climate
Inland Antarctic ice contains volumes of water that can raise global sea levels by several metres. (2020-02-27)
Overlooked arch in the foot is key to its evolution and function
A long-overlooked part of the human foot is key to how the foot works, how it evolved, and how we walk and run, a Yale-led team of researchers said. (2020-02-26)
Mathematician identifies new tricks for the old arch in our foot
Walking and running subjects our feet to forces in excess of body weight. (2020-02-26)
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