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Current Imaging News and Events

Current Imaging News and Events, Imaging News Articles.
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CU researchers: Fast MRIs offer alternative to CT scans for pediatric head injuries
Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have released a study that shows that a new imaging method 'fast MRI' is effective in identifying traumatic brain injuries in children, and can avoid exposure to ionizing radiation and anesthesia. (2019-09-18)
Brain imaging shows how nonverbal children with autism have slower response to sounds
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) used state-of-the-art brain imaging techniques to determine how nonverbal or minimally verbal people who have autism spectrum disorder (ASD) processes auditory stimuli, which could have important diagnostic and prognostic implications across the autism spectrum. (2019-09-18)
Every step a cell takes, every move they make -- scientists will be watching
An interdisciplinary team has found a solution to a problem plaguing developmental biology -- long-term cell tracking and manipulation. (2019-09-17)
Studying drivers behind cardiac arrhythmias
Despite advances in medical imaging, the mechanisms leading to the irregular contractions of the heart during rhythm disorders remain poorly understood. (2019-09-17)
Nonphysician providers rarely interpret diagnostic imaging -- except radiography, fluoroscopy
Although Medicare claims data confirm the increasing role of nonphysician providers in imaging-guided procedures across the United States, according to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology, nurse practitioners and physician assistants still rarely render diagnostic imaging services, compared with the overall number of diagnostic imaging interpretations. (2019-09-13)
Lollies, vitamins and fish-shaped sauce containers hit the MRI mark
A study by Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia, has identified four common items that could be cheaper and equally effective alternatives to commercial markers for use in MRI scanning to pinpoint specific anatomical areas or pathologies being scanned. (2019-09-09)
Single traumatic brain injury can have long-term consequences for cognition
A single incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to long-lasting neurodegeneration, according to a study of 32 individuals. (2019-09-04)
ASNC announces multisocietal cardiac amyloidosis imaging consensus
ASNC assembled a writing team of 26 experts in cardiovascular imaging and amyloidosis representing nine societies to author Expert Consensus Recommendations For Multimodality Imaging in Cardiac Amyloidosis. (2019-09-04)
Use of medical imaging
This observational study looked at patterns of use for computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and nuclear medicine imaging in the United States and in Ontario, Canada, from 2000 to 2016. (2019-09-03)
A dual imaging approach may improve diagnosis and monitoring of prostate cancer
A new platform that combines two established imaging methods can peer into both the structure and molecular makeup of the prostate in men with prostate cancer. (2019-08-28)
Computational approach speeds up advanced microscopy imaging
Researchers have developed a way to enhance the imaging speed of two-photon microscopy up to 5 times without compromising resolution. (2019-08-27)
Dietary zinc protects against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection
Researchers have uncovered a crucial link between dietary zinc intake and protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae, the primary bacterial cause of pneumonia. (2019-08-22)
Scientists propose network of imaging centers to drive innovation in biological research
Last fall, the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) convened a National Science Foundation workshop to identify the bottlenecks that stymie innovation in microscopy and imaging, and recommend approaches for transforming how imaging technologies are developed and deployed. (2019-08-21)
Scaling up a nanoimmunotherapy for atherosclerosis through preclinical testing
By integrating translational imaging techniques with improvements to production methods, Tina Binderup and colleagues have scaled up a promising nanoimmunotherapy for atherosclerosis in mice, rabbits and pigs -- surmounting a major obstacle in nanomedicine. (2019-08-21)
Yale study uses real-time fMRI to treat Tourette Syndrome
Characterized by repetitive movements or vocalizations known as tics, Tourette Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that plagues many adolescents. (2019-08-21)
Thanks to a world record in tomography, synchrotron radiation can be used to watch how metal foam forms
An international research team at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) has set a new tomography world record using a rotary sample table developed at the HZB. (2019-08-21)
uSEE breakthrough unlocks the nanoscale world on standard biology lab equipment
Standard optical microscopes can image cells and bacteria but not their nanoscale features which are blurred by a physical effect called diffraction. (2019-08-16)
Comparison between major types of arthritis based on diagnostic ultrasonography
Ultrasound is a non-invasive and relatively inexpensive means of diagnosing a number of medical conditions. (2019-08-09)
Two-in-one contrast agent for medical imaging
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) visualizes internal body structures, often with the help of contrast agents to enhance sensitivity. (2019-08-08)
Collaboration sees sustained increase in imaging history quality from ordering providers
American Journal of Roentgenology 'Original Research' article standardizes the definition of complete imaging history and engineers systems to include supportive prompts in the order entry interface with a single keystroke -- sustainably improving the quality of all imaging histories. (2019-08-07)
Lessons of conventional imaging let scientists see around corners
Scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Universidad de Zaragoza in Spain, drawing on the lessons of classical optics, have shown that it is possible to image complex hidden scenes using a projected 'virtual camera' to see around barriers. (2019-08-05)
Neuroimaging essential for Zika cases
Infants in a recent study 'represented a group of ZIKV-exposed infants who would be expected to have a high burden of neuroimaging abnormalities, which is a difference from other reported cohorts,' Sarah B. (2019-07-31)
What the brains of people with excellent general knowledge look like
The brains of people with excellent general knowledge are particularly efficiently wired. (2019-07-31)
Worrisome increase in some medical scans during pregnancy
Use of medical imaging during pregnancy increased significantly in the United States, a new study has found, with nearly a four-fold rise over the last two decades in the number of women undergoing computed tomography (CT) scans, which expose mothers and fetuses to radiation. (2019-07-24)
Closing the terahertz gap: Tiny laser is an important step toward new sensors
In a major step toward developing portable scanners that can rapidly measure molecules in pharmaceuticals or classify tissue in patients' skin, researchers have created an imaging system that uses lasers small and efficient enough to fit on a microchip. (2019-07-24)
Box-sized sensor brings portable, noninvasive fluid monitoring to the bedside
Lina Colucci and colleagues have created a portable device that within 45 seconds accurately detected excess fluid buildup in the legs of seven participants with end-stage kidney failure. (2019-07-24)
Solving the salt problem for seismic imaging
Automated imaging of underground salt bodies from seismic data could help streamline oil and gas exploration. (2019-07-22)
CNIC is the coordinator of an international consensus document on the use of magnetic resonance
CNIC has coordinated the first international consensus document providing guidelines on the conduct of magnetic resonance imaging studies after a myocardial infarction in clinical trials or experimental models. (2019-07-08)
New imaging method aids in water decontamination
A breakthrough imaging technique developed by Cornell University researchers shows promise in decontaminating water by yielding surprising and important information about catalyst particles that can't be obtained any other way. (2019-07-08)
It's not an antibody, it's a frankenbody: A new tool for live-cell imaging
Researchers from Colorado State University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology have added a new tool to the arsenal of antibody-based probes, but with a powerful distinction: Their genetically encoded probe works in living cells. (2019-07-03)
One simple change cut unnecessary imaging for cancer patients in half
Most 'nudges' seek to increase a behavior, but this is one of the few employed to reduce it. (2019-06-27)
Influence of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine jumps 25%
The Journal of Nuclear Medicine again ranks among the top 5 medical imaging journals in the world. (2019-06-27)
Molecular imaging suggests smokers may have impaired neuroimmune function
Research presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNM MI) shows preliminary evidence that tobacco smokers may have reduced neuroimmune function compared with nonsmokers. (2019-06-25)
PET/CT detects cardiovascular disease risk factors in obstructive sleep apnea patients
Research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2019 Annual Meeting draws a strong link between severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and impaired coronary flow reserve, which is an early sign of the heart disease atherosclerosis. (2019-06-24)
Interim scan during prostate cancer therapy helps guide treatment
New prostate cancer research shows that adding an interim scan during therapy can help guide a patient's treatment. (2019-06-24)
Earlier diagnosis and treatment assessment of tuberculosis achieved with pet/ct
Research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2019 Annual Meeting shows that molecular imaging with 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can evaluate tuberculosis at the molecular level, effectively identifying diseased areas and guiding treatment for patients. (2019-06-24)
Nuclear medicine PSMA-targeted study offers new options for cancer theranostics worldwide
Research presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) describes a new class of radiopharmaceuticals, named radiohybrids (rh), that offer a fresh perspective on cancer imaging and radioligand therapy (theranostics). (2019-06-24)
Novel noninvasive molecular imaging for monitoring rheumatoid arthritis
A first-in-human Phase 1/Phase II study demonstrates that intravenous administration of the radiopharmaceutical imaging agent technetium-99m (99mTc) tilmanocept promises to be a safe, well-tolerated, noninvasive means of monitoring rheumatoid arthritis disease activity. (2019-06-23)
Scientists discover new method for developing tracers used for medical imaging
University of North Carolina researchers discovered a method for creating radioactive tracers to better track pharmaceuticals in the body as well as image diseases, such as cancer, and other medical conditions. (2019-06-20)
Researchers see around corners to detect object shapes
Computer vision researchers have demonstrated they can use special light sources and sensors to see around corners or through gauzy filters, enabling them to reconstruct the shapes of unseen objects. (2019-06-19)
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