Current Incentives News and Events

Current Incentives News and Events, Incentives News Articles.
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Better than money? In-kind payments incentivize farmers to conserve agrobiodiversity
An innovative payment scheme for ecosystem services successfully encouraged farmers to cultivate and conserve agrobiodiversity, according to a new study of eight years of implementation in Latin America (2020-11-16)

Potentially preventable hospitalizations among older adults: 2010-2014
When complications due to diabetes, asthma, urinary tract infections, high blood pressure and other common conditions lead patients to visit the ER, researchers and health care quality administrators may label these visits as ''potentially preventable hospitalizations.'' That is, with good outpatient care, these visits could have been potentially avoided. Potentially preventable hospitalizations are costly and can negatively impact the health and well-being of individuals, particularly if they are older. (2020-11-10)

How to accelerate solar adoption for the underserved
Berkeley Lab researchers examined if certain policy and business models could improve solar panel adoption equity in terms of household income. They found that three of the five interventions they studied, including targeted financial incentives and leasing models, do increase adoption of solar photovoltaics (PV) among low- and middle-income households, thus increasing adoption equity, which they define as the degree to which adopter incomes reflect the incomes of the general population. (2020-11-09)

Do small gifts to donors increase charity appeal ROI?
Pre-giving incentives have different effects on different outcomes. The best strategy depends on what the charity wants to achieve. (2020-11-04)

COVID-19 vaccine nationalism could cost world up to $1.2 trillion: New RAND Europe study
A huge global research effort is taking place to bring a fast-tracked COVID-19 vaccine to the market but there is concern that certain countries may prioritise their own population's access to any vaccines developed. New RAND Europe research shows that if some countries are unable to obtain vaccines owing to vaccine nationalism it could cost the global economy up to $1.2 trillion per year in GDP terms. (2020-10-28)

Focused efforts needed to help health IT reach its promise
Most health systems have adopted electronic health records and other health information technology over the past decade, yet the performance of health systems across the US continues to lag. A new study finds that leveraging the technology to improve the quality of health care will require significant and sustained effort by health systems. (2020-10-27)

A fraction of global COVID-19 stimulus funds could aid climate change efforts
A modest fraction of worldwide COVID-19 economic stimulus package funds--which have surpassed USD 12 trillion to date--could help put the world on track to Paris Agreement goals for the climate, say Marina Andrijevic and colleagues in this Policy Forum. (2020-10-15)

The unending waste management challenge - are we at our wits' end?
The doctoral dissertation by Beatrice Obule-Abila (University of Vaasa, Finland) focuses on changing the paradigm of waste management by exploring the adoption of knowledge management framework, developing and deploying more knowledge management tools, systems, and approaches in seeking solutions to the problem of waste: so that waste no longer constitutes a nuisance, but a valuable resource. (2020-10-12)

Enforcement more effective than financial incentives in reducing harmful peat fires?
A new study looking at incentives to reduce globally harmful peatland fires suggests that fear of enforcement and public health concerns influence behaviour more than the promise of financial rewards. The findings come as wildfires devastate the US West Coast and Russian Arctic, and fire season begins in Australia, Indonesia and Brazil. (2020-09-30)

Covert tobacco industry marketing tactics exposed by former employees
Tobacco companies use covert marketing tactics and exploit loopholes in Australian tobacco control laws to promote their products despite current tobacco advertising bans, finds new research from University of Sydney and Cancer Council NSW. To circumvent current tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship (TAPS) laws in Australia, tobacco companies are incentivising retailers with cash payments, all-expenses paid holidays, exclusive parties and tickets to sporting events to drive tobacco sales. (2020-09-28)

Overpriced? TUD researchers explain artificial price increases in the taxi app Uber
How exactly does the strategy of the artificial price increases in the taxi app Uber work and when is it used? This is what Dr. Malte Schröder and Professor Marc Timme from the Chair for Network Dynamics at the Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) and the Institute for Theoretical Physics at TU Dresden have been investigating alongside PhD students David-Maximilian Storch and Philip Marszal. The two researchers published a study in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-09-24)

Buffalo-based study aims to connect the dots on food access
A new University at Buffalo study based in Western New York is the first that simultaneously examined the preferences of community members and compared those with the community-based programs and resources available to identify the most viable strategies for addressing disparities in healthy food consumption. (2020-09-18)

Trust the power of markets
Organizations using groups or committees to make decisions might do better to crowdsource their decisions, says UC Riverside-led research. The study found that people trust groups even though their susceptibility to manipulation can cause poor decisions. Information markets, in which people bet on potential outcomes, make more accurate decisions, but people trust them less. Once people get used to using markets they trust them more, making markets a useful decision-making tool for large organizations. (2020-08-25)

Climate change mitigation not the primary motivator in regenerative ranching
Regenerative ranching, a holistic approach to managing grazing lands, enhances ranchers' adaptive capacity and socioeconomic well-being while also providing an opportunity to mitigate climate change. (2020-08-17)

Examine narratives to end policy deadlock, boost agricultural development in Africa, economists say
Impasse over dominant and counter approaches-- state-led or market-led policy-- to promote agricultural development in Africa could be solved by analyzing the one-sided narratives that shape this dichotomy. (2020-07-13)

Putting zinc on bread wheat leaves
Applying zinc to the leaves of bread wheat can increase wheat grain zinc concentrations and improve its nutritional content. (2020-07-02)

Matching-commitment agreements to incentivize climate action
Many countries are failing to comply with the non-binding commitments of the Paris Agreement, making it increasingly clear that we have to reconsider how to ensure collective action to limit global warming to less than 2°C above preindustrial levels. A new IIASA-led study supports a different approach to designing an international climate agreement that would incentivize countries to cooperate. (2020-06-19)

New research says displaying fake reviews increases consumer trust in platforms by 80%
Many people are using COVID-19 quarantine to get projects done at home, meaning plenty of online shopping for tools and supplies. But do you buy blind? Research shows 97% of consumers consult product reviews before making a purchase. Fake reviews are a significant threat for online review portals and product search engines given the potential for damage to consumer trust. Little is known about what review portals should do with fraudulent reviews after detecting them. (2020-06-18)

State-level R&D tax credits spur growth of new businesses
Here's some good news for US states trying to spur an economic recovery in the years ahead: The R&D tax credit has a significant effect on entrepreneurship, according to a new study led by an MIT professor. (2020-06-12)

Economic Development Quarterly announces a special issue on business incentives
Local and state policymakers push economic development incentives to spur job creation and economic wealth. The outstanding question is, 'do these various types of financial incentives--tax credits, abatements, grants, and others--work?' The selected research papers in the May issue of Economic Development Quarterly (EDQ) focus on estimating the effect of local and state financial incentives in shaping business location decisions. (2020-06-02)

Effect of workplace wellness program on employee health, medical use
This randomized clinical trial evaluated the effect of a workplace wellness program that included health screenings, wellness activities and financial incentives on employee health, health beliefs and medical use after 12 and 24 months among 4,800 employees at a large US university. (2020-05-26)

Solving the space junk problem
Aging satellites and space debris crowd low-Earth orbit, and launching new satellites adds to the collision risk. The most effective way to solve the space junk problem, according to a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is not to capture debris or deorbit old satellites: it's an international agreement to charge operators 'orbital-use fees' for every satellite put into orbit. (2020-05-25)

Study suggests aggressive carbon taxation could help US meet targets in Paris agreement
A new study looked at US tax policy as it relates to carbon dioxide (CO2), from 2015 through 2030. The study found only limited short-term opportunities for decarbonization (reducing greenhouse gas emissions) outside the electricity sector. The result is substantial CO2 tax revenue. The findings shed light on future tax policy decisions. (2020-05-19)

Talent is key to school turnarounds
New research has shown that the key to implementing successful reform in low-performing schools is hiring and retaining effective principals and teachers. (2020-05-08)

HRM practices a predictor for business resilience after layoffs
As retrenchments continue to cloud the foreseeable future of businesses worldwide, new research from the University of South Australia, the University of Melbourne and RMIT indicates that some businesses will fare better than others -- and it's all dependent on their type of human resource management system. (2020-04-30)

Tax incentives for businesses could contribute to the decline of the middle class
Economic development incentives may do more harm than good, especially for middle-class workers, according to new West Virginia University research. (2020-03-09)

Drug development for rare diseases affecting children is increasing
The number of treatments for rare diseases affecting children has increased, a new study suggests. But federal incentives intended to encourage drug development for rare conditions are being used more often to expand the use of existing drugs rather than for creating new ones. (2020-03-03)

The GDP fudge: China edition
By linking GDP growth to promotions, the Chinese government has inadvertently created incentives for provincial officials to report inaccurate financial data, a study says. (2020-03-02)

Study: Corporate tax incentives do more harm than good to states
A study of tax incentives aimed at attracting and retaining businesses finds that the vast majority of these incentives ultimately leave states worse off than if they had done nothing. (2020-02-27)

Illuminating interactions between decision-making and the environment
Employing a game theory model, University of Pennsylvania researchers demonstrate how strategic decisions influence the environment in which those decisions are made, alterations which in turn influence strategy. Their analysis, which identifies how incentives can tip a strategy from one extreme to another, applies to fields as diverse as fisheries dynamics to climate change policy. (2020-02-19)

What is the best way to encourage innovation? Competitive pay may be the answer
Economists and business leaders agree that innovation is a major force behind economic growth, but many disagree on what is the best way to encourage workers to produce the 'think-outside-of-the-box' ideas that create newer and better products and services. New research from the University of California San Diego indicates that competitive 'winner-takes-all' pay structures are most effective in getting the creative juices flowing that help fuel economic growth. (2020-02-12)

Pilot program aims to improve reproducibility, utility, and ethics of biomedical research
Addressing the widespread concern over transparency and reproducibility in biomedical research, one of the largest institutions in German science has begun to provide a framework, interventions, and incentives for improving the quality and value of translational research. The program is described by its leader, Ulrich Dirnagl of Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), and colleagues in a new article publishing on Feb. 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. (2020-02-11)

Place-based tax incentives stimulate employment in remote regions
A place-based payroll tax incentive can be effective in stimulating employment in remote and underdeveloped regions, helping to address regional inequalities, according to a new UCL and University of Oslo study. (2020-02-09)

Publicly sharing a goal could help you persist after hitting failure
Publicly sharing a goal may help you persist after hitting a failure, but only if you care about what others think of you, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-02-04)

Structured, salary-only compensation plan for physicians is a model for pay equity
Gender pay equity in the field of medicine remains elusive. Gender-based pay differences have been shown to persist, even when controlling for experience, clinical productivity, academic rank and other factors. These inequities result in significantly lower lifetime earnings, job burnout and negative attitudes toward work, and adverse effects on the profession and society. (2020-01-02)

Addressing committed emissions in both US and China requires carbon capture and storage
While the energy systems of the two highest-emitting countries differ, each needs to develop CCS to address their committed emissions, which threaten global climate targets. (2019-12-19)

APS tip sheet: Dark matter's galactic emissions and game theory of vaccination
The APS Tip Sheet highlights noteworthy research recently published in the Physical Review Journals. Unless otherwise noted, Physical Review papers are not embargoed. Please contact media@aps.org for media inquiries and complimentary access to the journals. (2019-12-11)

Ratcheting up NBA rookie salaries may incentivize athletes to finish college
In a paper for the 'International Journal of Sport Finance' Barbara Arel and Michael J. Tomas III, faculty in the business school at the University of Vermont, reimagined the NBA's rookie salary scale to redistribute pay in a way that compensates players for each year of college completed. (2019-12-05)

New modeling will shed light on policy decisions' effect on migration from sea level rise
A new modeling approach can help researchers, policymakers and the public better understand how policy decisions will influence human migration as sea levels rise around the globe. (2019-11-26)

Income inequality fuels status anxiety and sexualisation, research shows
Researchers at the universities of Melbourne and New South Wales have examined the relationship between income inequality, status anxiety and sexualisation of women. (2019-11-25)

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