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Current Indigenous people News and Events

Current Indigenous people News and Events, Indigenous people News Articles.
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Bolivian forager-farmers with amazing heart health are split over what makes a good life
A small Bolivian society of indigenous forager-farmers, known for astonishingly healthy cardiovascular systems, is seeing a split in beliefs about what makes a good life. (2019-10-16)
Fishing for answers: Researchers develop tool to incorporate social, cultural concerns in resource management
Okamoto and a group of biologists, mathematicians, social scientists, resource managers and representatives of indigenous cultures have created tools that look at the social and cultural costs and benefits of different management strategies used to protect and recover fisheries. (2019-10-14)
Study examines impact of climate change on Louisiana's Houma tribe
Repeated disasters and environmental changes on Louisiana's Gulf Coast are rapidly eroding the land, and along with it, an Indigenous tribe's ability to sustain its culture, health and livelihoods, new research suggests. (2019-09-27)
Music is essential for the transmission of ethnobiological knowledge
Songs are a storehouse for ethnobiological knowledge and a means to construct, maintain and mobilize peoples' relations with their local environments. (2019-09-26)
Extinct human species gave modern humans an immunity boost
Garvan researchers have discovered a gene variant that sheds new light on how human immunity was fine-tuned through history. (2019-09-18)
Wilderness areas halve extinction risk
The global conservation community has been urged to adopt a specific target to protect the world's remaining wilderness areas to prevent large scale loss of at-risk species. (2019-09-18)
Undervalued wilderness areas can cut extinction risk in half
Wilderness areas, long known for intrinsic conservation value, are far more valuable for biodiversity than previously believed, and if conserved, will cut the world's extinction risk in half, according to a new study published in the journal Nature. (2019-09-18)
Study finds human hearts evolved for endurance
Major physical changes occurred in the human heart as people shifted from hunting and foraging to farming and modern life. (2019-09-16)
Latest studies suggest a possible downturn in rate of new cases of diabetes
While overall, the numbers (prevalence) of people with type 2 diabetes continue to grow at an alarming rate, new research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept. (2019-09-15)
New viruses discovered in endangered wild Pacific salmon populations
Three new viruses -- including one from a group of viruses never before shown to infect fish -- have been discovered in endangered Chinook and sockeye salmon populations. (2019-09-04)
Livestock bones help date the earliest spread of millet grains outside China
New research from Washington University in St. Louis and Kiel University in Germany uses DNA from the skeletal remains of sheep and goats to show that animals first domesticated in the Near East had reached eastern Kazakhstan by 2700 BC, and that these animals were fed millet grain first domesticated in China to help them survive harsh winters. (2019-09-04)
Parasitic worms infect dogs, humans
A human infective nematode found in remote northern areas of Australia has been identified in canine carriers for the first time. (2019-08-26)
Damage found in the bit area of most Finnish trotters
In a Finnish study, damage was found in the part of the mouth affected by the bit in more than 80% of trotters examined after a race. (2019-08-16)
Premature mortality is partly predicted by city neighborhood
A new in-depth study from Ryerson University called 'The influence of environmental and health indicators on premature mortality: an empirical analysis of the City of Toronto's 140 neighborhoods' assesses the impact of several environmental, health, socioeconomic and demographic characteristics on lifespan. (2019-08-15)
DNA tests of UK waters could help catch invasive species early
A team of scientists led by the University of Southampton have discovered several artificially introduced species in the coastal waters of southern England, using a technique that could help the early detection of non-native species if adopted more widely. (2019-08-13)
Coca and conflict: the factors fuelling Colombian deforestation
Deforestation in Colombia has been linked to armed conflict and forests' proximity to coca crops, the plant from which cocaine is derived. (2019-08-13)
High lead concentrations in amazonian wildlife
Researchers from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and the Central University of Catalonia/Vic University detect high levels of lead concentration in wildlife samples from the Peruvian Amazon caused by lead-based ammunition and oil-related pollution in extraction areas. (2019-08-05)
The front line of environmental violence
Environmental defenders on the front line of natural resource conflict are being killed at an alarming rate, according to a University of Queensland study. (2019-08-05)
Many North American indigenous youth experience symptoms of depression during adolescence
A new study that analyzed data on the development of depressive symptoms among Indigenous youth in the United States and Canada found that many of the youth had experienced these symptoms during adolescence. (2019-07-31)
Biodiversity highest on Indigenous-managed lands
More than one million plant and animal species worldwide are facing extinction, according to a recent United Nations report. (2019-07-31)
Suicidal thoughts can be reduced among Indigenous people; this new study finds the factors
New nationally representative Canadian study from the University of Toronto and Algoma University finds that 3-quarters of formerly suicidal Indigenous adults who are living off-reserve had been free from suicidal thoughts in the past year. (2019-07-23)
UNM scientists document late Pleistocene/early Holocene Mesoamerican stone tool tradition
In new research published recently in PLOS One titled Linking late Paleoindian stone tool technlogies and populations in North, Central and South America, scientists from The University of NewMexico led a study in Belize to document the very earliest indigenous stone tool tradition in southern Mesoamerica. (2019-07-22)
Sustainable land management key to reducing Amazon wildfires, study shows
The unrelenting deforestation of the Amazon region could lead to a dramatic increase to the risk of destructive wildfire outbreaks, research has shown. (2019-07-19)
Study reveals unusually high carbon stocks and tree diversity in Panama's Darien forest
Through a participatory forest-carbon monitoring project in the Darien forest of Panama, scientists and a team of trained indigenous technicians found that, even in disturbed areas, it maintained the same tree species richness and a disproportionately high capacity to sequester carbon. (2019-07-18)
New study works with historically disenfranchised communities to combat sudden oak death
Science often reflects the priorities of dominant industries and ignores the needs of disenfranchised communities, resulting in the perpetuation of historical injustices. (2019-07-17)
Expert panel identifies top climate risks for Canada, potential for adaptation
An expert panel convened by the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) has identified Canada's top climate change risks and determined that many costs and damages could be avoided with prompt and thoughtful adaptation. (2019-07-08)
Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru
Methods used 1,400 years ago could boost water availability during Lima's dry season, according to new Imperial College London research. (2019-06-24)
Indigenous oral health inequalities begin in childhood: A multi-country study
At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Dandara Haag, University of Adelaide, Australia, gave an oral presentation on 'Indigenous Oral Health Inequalities Begin in Childhood: A Multi-country Study.' (2019-06-22)
Climate change had significant impact on Amazon communities before arrival of Europeans
Climate change had a significant impact on people living in the Amazon rainforest before the arrival of Europeans and the loss of many indigenous groups, a new study shows. (2019-06-17)
How protected areas are losing ground in the United States and Amazonia
Once champions of global conservation, the United States and Brazil are now leading a troubling global trend of large-scale rollbacks in environmental policy, putting hundreds of protected areas at risk, a new study suggests. (2019-05-30)
Multi-step spread of first herders into sub-Saharan Africa
An analysis of 41 ancient African genomes led by Mary Prendergast and David Reich suggests that the spread of herding and farming into eastern Africa affected human populations in phases, involving multiple movements of -- and gene flow among -- ancestrally distinct groups. (2019-05-30)
Trace metal exposure among pregnant women living near fracking wells in Canada
Researchers find higher concentrations of trace metals such as barium in the hair and urine of 29 pregnant women living near fracking wells in British Columbia, Canada. (2019-05-23)
The cultural significance of carbon-storing peatlands to rural communities
A group of UK and Peruvian researchers have carried out the first detailed study of how rural communities interact with peatlands in the Peruvian Amazon, a landscape that is one of the world's largest stores of carbon. (2019-05-21)
Discrimination against older people needs attention, study says
Ever cracked a joke about old people? It might seem funny, but in a world where the population aged 60 or over is growing faster than all younger age groups, ageism is no laughing matter, says a University of Alberta researcher. (2019-05-21)
Abrupt climate change drove early South American population decline
Abrupt climate change some 8,000 years ago led to a dramatic decline in early South American populations, suggests new UCL research. (2019-05-09)
High rates of Indigenous people in jail is a health crisis
The overincarceration of Indigenous people in Canada is a health crisis, causing more years of life to be lost than premature death from heart disease, injuries and cancer, argues a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-05-06)
The quiet loss of knowledge threatens indigenous communities
Most of the knowledge that indigenous communities in South America have about plants is not written down. (2019-05-02)
Details of the history of inner Eurasia revealed by new study
An international team of researchers has combined archaeological, historical and linguistic data with genetic information from over 700 newly analyzed individuals to construct a more detailed picture of the history of inner Eurasia than ever before available. (2019-04-29)
Vaccine-preventable diseases surge in crisis-hit Venezuela
Vaccine-preventable diseases have not just returned, but surged in crisis hit Venezuela, according to new research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019). (2019-04-15)
Researchers interpret Cherokee inscriptions in Alabama cave
For the first time, a team of scholars and archaeologists has recorded and interpreted Cherokee inscriptions in Manitou Cave, Alabama. (2019-04-10)
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