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Current Indigenous people News and Events

Current Indigenous people News and Events, Indigenous people News Articles.
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How protected areas are losing ground in the United States and Amazonia
Once champions of global conservation, the United States and Brazil are now leading a troubling global trend of large-scale rollbacks in environmental policy, putting hundreds of protected areas at risk, a new study suggests. (2019-05-30)
Multi-step spread of first herders into sub-Saharan Africa
An analysis of 41 ancient African genomes led by Mary Prendergast and David Reich suggests that the spread of herding and farming into eastern Africa affected human populations in phases, involving multiple movements of -- and gene flow among -- ancestrally distinct groups. (2019-05-30)
Trace metal exposure among pregnant women living near fracking wells in Canada
Researchers find higher concentrations of trace metals such as barium in the hair and urine of 29 pregnant women living near fracking wells in British Columbia, Canada. (2019-05-23)
The cultural significance of carbon-storing peatlands to rural communities
A group of UK and Peruvian researchers have carried out the first detailed study of how rural communities interact with peatlands in the Peruvian Amazon, a landscape that is one of the world's largest stores of carbon. (2019-05-21)
Discrimination against older people needs attention, study says
Ever cracked a joke about old people? It might seem funny, but in a world where the population aged 60 or over is growing faster than all younger age groups, ageism is no laughing matter, says a University of Alberta researcher. (2019-05-21)
Abrupt climate change drove early South American population decline
Abrupt climate change some 8,000 years ago led to a dramatic decline in early South American populations, suggests new UCL research. (2019-05-09)
High rates of Indigenous people in jail is a health crisis
The overincarceration of Indigenous people in Canada is a health crisis, causing more years of life to be lost than premature death from heart disease, injuries and cancer, argues a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-05-06)
The quiet loss of knowledge threatens indigenous communities
Most of the knowledge that indigenous communities in South America have about plants is not written down. (2019-05-02)
Details of the history of inner Eurasia revealed by new study
An international team of researchers has combined archaeological, historical and linguistic data with genetic information from over 700 newly analyzed individuals to construct a more detailed picture of the history of inner Eurasia than ever before available. (2019-04-29)
Vaccine-preventable diseases surge in crisis-hit Venezuela
Vaccine-preventable diseases have not just returned, but surged in crisis hit Venezuela, according to new research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019). (2019-04-15)
Researchers interpret Cherokee inscriptions in Alabama cave
For the first time, a team of scholars and archaeologists has recorded and interpreted Cherokee inscriptions in Manitou Cave, Alabama. (2019-04-10)
World-first study shows Indigenous skills vital to conservation research outcomes
Working with Aboriginal rangers in the Kimberley, University of Sydney biologists have published a study with the first empirical evidence that culturally diverse teams produces better conservation results. (2019-04-08)
Rainforest conservation in Peru must become more effective
A few years ago, the Peruvian government launched a program to protect the rainforest. (2019-04-05)
New expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies
A new expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) finds that many Indigenous communities do not receive policing services that meet their safety and security needs, and the evidence suggests a relationship-based, community driven approach provides an opportunity to make meaningful and sustainable improvements. (2019-04-04)
Human history through tree rings: Trees in Amazonia reveal pre-colonial human disturbance
The Brazil nut tree (Bertholletia excelsa) is well known around the world today and has been an important part of human subsistence strategies in the Amazon forest from at least the Early Holocene. (2019-04-03)
Amazon rainforest could become US-China trade war casualty, experts warn
Deforestation of the Amazon rainforest could accelerate as a result of the US-China trade war, University of Edinburgh researchers have warned. (2019-03-29)
Income inequalities in Indigenous groups linked to mental health issues
Indigenous peoples in Canada have high rates of psychological distress, suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts, and these mental health issues are linked to income inequalities, found a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-03-25)
Surge in cannabis use among youth preceded legalization in Canada
National discussions on cannabis legalization, along with increased access to medical marijuana, may have encouraged more high school students to consume the drug years before it became legal in Canada. (2019-03-25)
C-sections are seen as breastfeeding barrier in US, but not in other global communities
Amanda Veile, an assistant professor of anthropology at Purdue University, and her team report that indigenous mothers in farming communities in Yucat√°n, Mexico, breastfeed for about 1.5 months longer following cesarean deliveries than they do following vaginal deliveries. (2019-03-21)
Eating fish may help prevent asthma
A scientist from James Cook University in Australia says an innovative study has revealed new evidence that eating fish can help prevent asthma. (2019-03-18)
Hepatitis B virus sheds light on ancient human population movements into Australia
Australian researchers have used hepatitis B virus genome sequences to deduce that the mainland Aboriginal population separated from other early humans at least 59,000 years ago. (2019-03-17)
Ancient DNA research shines spotlight on Iberia
The University of Huddersfield's Archaeogenetics Research Group joins an international team to conduct the largest-ever study of ancient DNA from the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) which suggests that the Iberian male lineages were almost completely replaced between 4,500 and 4,000 years ago by newcomers originating on the Russian steppe. (2019-03-14)
Revamping science: Making room for more voices
Science is known for being objective and apolitical, but is it? (2019-03-12)
Pollinators need people
A global study has concluded that people are essential to conserving the pollinators that maintain and protect biodiversity, agriculture and habitat. (2019-03-11)
Translocation of bighorn sheep in Arizona has positive genetic outcomes
Research shows it is possible to re-establish bighorn sheep populations without a reduction of genetic diversity over a short period and without erosion of ancestral lineage. (2019-03-06)
WSU researcher discovers oldest tattoo tool in western North America
Washington State University archaeologists have discovered the oldest tattooing artifact in western North America. (2019-02-28)
3,500 years of shellfish farming by indigenous peoples on the Northwest coast
The indigenous peoples of British Columbia have been harvesting shellfish from specially-constructed clam gardens for at least 3,500 years, according to a study released Feb. (2019-02-27)
Northwest Coast clam gardens nearly 2,000 years older than previously thought -- study
A study led by SFU archaeology professor Dana Lepofsky and Hakai Institute researcher Nicole Smith reveals that clam gardens, ancient Indigenous food security systems located along B.C.'s coast, date back at least 3,500 years -- almost 2,000 years older than previously thought. (2019-02-27)
Indigenous knowledge, key to a successful ecosystem restoration
Ecological restoration projects actively involving indigenous peoples and local communities are more successful. (2019-02-26)
Indigenous agriculture has potential to contribute to food needs under climate change
Researchers from Kamehameha Schools, University of Hawaii at Manoa and the United States Geological Survey have published a study in the journal Nature Sustainability (March 2019) highlighting the large role indigenous agriculture can play in producing food, while supporting biodiversity and indigenous well-being in Hawaii under intense land use and climate changes. (2019-02-26)
Mothers with children taken into out-of-home care at risk of poor prenatal care in next pregnancies
Mothers whose first child was taken into care were found to have inadequate or no prenatal care during subsequent pregnancies, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-02-25)
Potential of strategic partnerships to form a Health Equity Network of the Americas (HENA)
Recognizing the persistence of health inequities in the Americas, an emerging Health Equity Network of the Americas (HENA) describes its approach to promoting health equity through intersectoral partnerships in a newly released issue of Ethnicity & Disease. (2019-02-22)
Indigenous hunters have positive impacts on food webs in desert Australia
Australia has the highest rate of mammal extinction in the world. (2019-02-17)
Marin County: Safe harbor for Native residents during the Mission era and beyond
Contrary to the dominant narrative of cultural extinction, indigenous residents of Marin County survived colonization, preserving and passing on their traditions and cultural practices. (2019-02-14)
Cultural practices improve health care for Indigenous women living with violence
The health of Indigenous women recovering from the trauma of partner violence improves when the healing process integrates elder-led circles and other cultural elements, finds new research from the University of British Columbia and Western University. (2019-01-31)
Addressing dietary inequities in Canada
To address the root causes of poor diets, improve nutrition and reduce dietary inequities in Canada requires a broad approach, combining nutrition and social policies, argues an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-01-28)
Body-painting protects against bloodsucking insects
A study by researchers from Sweden and Hungary shows that white, painted stripes on the body protect skin from insect bites. (2019-01-17)
3,000-year-old eastern North American quinoa discovered in Ontario
A mass of charred seeds found while clearing a home construction site in Brantford, Ontario, has been identified as ancient, domesticated goosefoot (C. berlandieri spp. jonesianum), a form of quinoa native to Eastern North America. (2019-01-14)
Revised Brazilian forest code may lead to increased legal deforestation in Amazon
Researchers show that up to 15 million hectares of forest risk losing protection owing to a new clause in the law under which state governments can let private landowners protect only 50 percent of their property, down from 80 percent previously, if over 65 percent of the state is protected by conservation units or indigenous reservations. (2019-01-04)
Major gaps remain in how traditional knowledge is used in salmon governance in Norway and Finland
A new article published today in the journal Arctic points to major challenges in the ways traditional knowledge is included in the management of Atlantic salmon in Norway and Finland. (2018-12-20)
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