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Current Infants News and Events

Current Infants News and Events, Infants News Articles.
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Early introduction of peanuts in babies to reduce allergy risk
Worried about peanut allergies in children? A practice article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) outlines five things to know about early introduction of peanuts in infants to reduce the risk of peanut allergy. (2019-07-22)
2016 election linked to increase in preterm births among US Latinas
A significant jump in preterm births to Latina mothers living in the U.S. occurred in the nine months following the November 8, 2016 election of President Donald Trump, according to a study led by a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2019-07-19)
Greater prevalence of congenital heart defects in high intensity oil and gas areas
Mothers living near more intense oil and gas development activity have a 40-70% higher chance of having children with congenital heart defects (CHDs) compared to those living in areas of less intense activity, according to a new study from researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health. (2019-07-18)
Maternal secrets of our earliest ancestors unlocked
New research brings to light for the first time the evolution of maternal roles and parenting responsibilities in one of our oldest evolutionary ancestors. (2019-07-15)
Study questions if tongue-tie surgery for breastfeeding is always needed
New research raises questions as to whether too many infants are getting tongue-tie and lip tether surgery (also called frenulectomy) to help improve breastfeeding, despite limited medical evidence supporting the procedure. (2019-07-11)
Mattresses could emit higher levels of VOCs during sleep
Hundreds of household items, including furniture, paint and electronics, emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which at high levels can pose health risks. (2019-07-10)
Symptom-triggered medication for neonatal opioid withdrawal yields shorter hospital stays
A study led by researchers at Boston Medical Center (BMC) found that symptom-triggered medication dosing for neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome instead of infants receiving a fixed schedule of medication with a long taper reduced the length of their hospital stay. (2019-07-09)
Growth failure in preterm infants tied to altered gut bacteria
Extremely premature infants who fail to grow as expected have delayed development of their microbiome, or communities of bacteria and other micro-organisms living in the gut, according to a new study published in Scientific Reports. (2019-07-09)
Blood flow monitor could save lives
A tiny fibre-optic sensor has the potential to save lives in open heart surgery, and even during surgery on pre-term babies. (2019-07-08)
New high blood pressure guidelines could increase detection of gestational hypertension
Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and colleagues conducted the first-ever study to evaluate the impact the 2017 ACA/AHA guidelines could have on detecting gestational hypertension. (2019-07-03)
A mechanism that makes infants more likely than adults to die from sepsis is discovered
Scientists at the Center for Research on Inflammatory Diseases (CRID) show why pediatric patients with sepsis suffer from more inflammation and organ injury than adults. (2019-07-03)
Arts and medicine: clarifying history, lessons for today from Peter Neubauer's twins study
This Arts and Medicine feature reviews 'Three Identical Strangers' and 'The Twinning Reaction,' two documentaries telling the story of identical twins and triplets adopted as infants into separate families who were unknowing participants in a two-decade nature vs. nurture study of child development beginning in 1960. (2019-07-02)
After WIC offered better food options, maternal and infant health improved
A major 2009 revision to a federal nutrition program for low-income pregnant women and children improved recipients' health on several key measures, researchers at UC San Francisco have found. (2019-07-01)
Benzodiazepine use with opioids intensifies neonatal abstinence syndrome
Babies born after being exposed to both opioids and benzodiazepines before birth are more likely to have severe drug withdrawal, requiring medications like morphine for treatment, compared to infants exposed to opioids alone, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in Hospital Pediatrics. (2019-07-01)
Infant mortality is higher for low-skilled parents
Infants of women with a short-term education are more likely to die within the first year of life. (2019-06-27)
Computational tool predicts how gut microbiome changes over time
A new computational modeling method uses snapshots of which types of microbes are found in a person's gut to predict how the microbial community will change over time. (2019-06-27)
Babies can learn link between language and ethnicity, study suggests
Eleven-month-old infants can learn to associate the language they hear with ethnicity, recent research from the University of British Columbia suggests. (2019-06-25)
New therapy targets gut bacteria to prevent and reverse food allergies
A new study, led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital, identifies the species of bacteria in the human infant gut that protect against food allergies, finding changes associated with the development of food allergies and an altered immune response. (2019-06-24)
Researchers find cause of rare, fatal disease that turns babies' lips and skin blue
Scientists used a gene editing method called CRISPR/Cas9 to generate mice that faithfully mimic a fatal respiratory disorder in newborn infants that turns their lips and skin blue. (2019-06-19)
Scientists identify genes associated with biliary atresia survival
Scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have identified an expression pattern of 14 genes at the time of diagnosis that predicts two year, transplant-free survival in children with biliary atresia -- the most common diagnosis leading to liver transplants in children. (2019-06-19)
State initiative to address disparities in mother's milk for very low birth weight infants
A new study, published in Pediatrics, indicates that the initiative yielded positive results on improving rates of prenatal human milk education, early milk expression and skin to skin care among mothers of very low birth weight infants during initial hospitalization, but did not lead to sustained improvement in mother's milk provision at hospital discharge. (2019-06-19)
Gut microbes associated with temperament traits in children
Scientists in the FinnBrain research project of the University of Turku discovered that the gut microbes of a 2.5-month-old infant are associated with the temperament traits manifested at six months of age. (2019-06-18)
Preventing hepatitis C transmission from mothers to babies
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission from mothers to babies could largely be prevented if Canada recommended universal screening for HCV in pregnancy, argues a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-06-17)
Breastmilk antibody protects preterm infants from deadly intestinal disease
Human and mouse experiments show that an antibody in breastmilk is necessary to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis -- an often deadly bacterial disease of the intestine. (2019-06-17)
Research identifies key driver for infanticide among chimpanzees
Study concludes that the sexual selection hypothesis was the main reason for the high rates of infanticide among a community of chimpanzees in Uganda. (2019-06-13)
Research finds pre-pregnancy weight affects infant growth response to breast milk
In the first study of its kind, LSU Health New Orleans researchers report that women's pre-pregnancy overweight or obesity produces changes in breast milk, which can affect infant growth. (2019-06-13)
New pathogens in beef and cow's milk products: More research required
In February 2019, the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ) presented findings on new infection pathogens that go by the name of 'Bovine Milk and Meat Factors' (BMMF). (2019-06-11)
Nationwide study finds breast cancer patients unaware of surgical options
The majority of women who underwent lumpectomy or mastectomy surgeries for breast cancer report that the scars from those surgeries negatively affect their daily lives. (2019-06-03)
A little formula in first days of life may not impact breastfeeding at 6 months
A study has lodged a new kink in the breastfeeding dilemma that adds to the angst of exhausted new parents: While most newborns lose weight in the first days of life, do you or don't you offer a little formula after breastfeeding if the weight loss is more than usual? (2019-06-03)
A common skin bacterium put children with severe eczema at higher risk of food allergy
In a new study published today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, scientists from King's College London have found that young children with severe eczema infected with Staphylococcus aureus (SA) bacterium, are at a higher risk of developing a food allergy. (2019-05-31)
Breastfeeding moms' milk can transfer lifelong protection against infection to their babies
Research in mice has found that the transfer of immunity from mum to baby can be long-term, beyond the period of breastfeeding. (2019-05-29)
Put more father friendly cues in OB/GYN offices, Rutgers-led study suggests
A new Rutgers-led study finds that by adding a few subtle cues to prenatal care waiting rooms, such as photos of men and babies, and pamphlets and magazines aimed toward men, OBGYNS can get fathers more involved in prenatal care and increase healthier outcomes for women and infants. (2019-05-28)
Music helps to build the brains of very premature babies
In Switzerland, 1% of children are born 'very prematurely.' These children are at high risk of developing neuropsychological disorders. (2019-05-27)
Do you hear what I hear?
A new study by Columbia University researchers found that infants at high risk for autism were less attuned to differences in speech patterns than low-risk infants. (2019-05-24)
Infants later diagnosed with autism seldom initiate joint attention
A new study published in Biological Psychiatry shows that infants who are later diagnosed with autism react adequately when others initiate joint attention, but seldom actively seek to establish such episodes themselves. (2019-05-22)
Bacterial pneumonia predicts ongoing lung problems in infants with acute respiratory FAI
Bacterial pneumonia appears to be linked to ongoing breathing problems in previously healthy infants who were hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure. (2019-05-19)
Protection by the malaria vaccine: not only a matter of quantity but also of quality
The quantity and quality of antibodies recognizing the end region of the malaria parasite's CSP protein is a good marker of protection by the RTS,S/AS01E vaccine, shows a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa.' The results provide valuable information for guiding the design of future, more effective vaccines. (2019-05-15)
3D images reveal how infants' heads change shape during birth
Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), scientists have captured 3D images that show how infants' brains and skulls change shape as they move through the birth canal just before delivery. (2019-05-15)
How much language are unborn children exposed to in the womb?
The different soundscapes of NICUs has recently attracted interest in how changes in what we hear in our earliest days might affect language development in the brain. (2019-05-14)
Early term infants less likely to breastfeed
A new, prospective study provides evidence that 'early term' infants (those born at 37-38 weeks) are less likely than full-term infants to be breastfeed within the first hour and at one month after birth. (2019-05-14)
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