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Current Infectious disease News and Events

Current Infectious disease News and Events, Infectious disease News Articles.
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New Penn-developed vaccine prevents herpes in mice, guinea pigs
A novel vaccine developed at Penn Medicine protected almost all mice and guinea pigs exposed to the herpes virus. (2019-09-20)
Towards better hand hygiene for flu prevention
Rubbing hands with ethanol-based sanitizers should provide a formidable defense against infection from flu viruses, which can thrive and spread in saliva and mucus. (2019-09-18)
Researchers find building mutations into Ebola virus protein disrupts ability to cause disease
Creating mutations in a key Ebola virus protein that helps the deadly virus escape from the body's defenses can make the virus unable to produce sickness and activate protective immunity in the infected host, according to a study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2019-09-17)
'Asexual' Chagas parasite found to sexually reproduce
The parasite that causes Chagas disease, which had largely been thought to be asexual, has been shown to reproduce sexually after scientists uncovered clues hidden in its genomic code. (2019-09-10)
NIAID officials call for innovative research on sexually transmitted infections
Sexually transmitted infections, or STIs, pose a significant public health challenge. (2019-09-09)
Research warns of the far-reaching consequences of measles epidemic and failure to vaccinate
The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) 5th Vaccine Conference will hear that the risks of failing to vaccinate children may extend far beyond one specific vaccine, although currently the most urgent problem to address is the resurgence of measles. (2019-09-05)
Cell-free DNA detects pathogens and quantifies damage
A new Cornell study, 'A Cell-Free DNA Metagenomic Sequencing Assay that Integrates the Host Injury Response to Infection,' published Aug. (2019-08-29)
Graphene shield shows promise in blocking mosquito bites
An innovative graphene-based film helps shield people from disease-carrying mosquitos, according to a new study funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2019-08-26)
Researchers identify key areas of measles virus polymerase to target for antiviral drug development
Targeting specific areas of the measles virus polymerase, a protein complex that copies the viral genome, can effectively fight the measles virus and be used as an approach to developing new antiviral drugs to treat the serious infectious disease, according to a study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University published in PLoS Pathogens. (2019-08-22)
Memory T cells shelter in bone marrow, boosting immunity in mice with restricted diets
Even when taking in fewer calories and nutrients, humans and other mammals usually remain protected against infectious diseases they have already encountered. (2019-08-22)
Antibiotics report highlights stewardship, workforce, research needs
A CDC report on antibiotics use in health care US healthcare settings show progress made in promoting appropriate use of infection-fighting drugs, but strengthened and continued efforts needed. (2019-08-20)
Association between coeliac disease risk and gluten intake confirmed
An extensive study has confirmed that the risk of developing coeliac disease is connected to the amount of gluten children consume. (2019-08-14)
Ancient natural history of antibiotic production and resistance revealed
The study is the first to put antibiotic biosynthesis and resistance into an evolutionary context. (2019-08-12)
Comparison between major types of arthritis based on diagnostic ultrasonography
Ultrasound is a non-invasive and relatively inexpensive means of diagnosing a number of medical conditions. (2019-08-09)
Nordic researchers: A quarter of the world's population at risk of developing tuberculosis
A new study from Aarhus University Hospital and Aarhus University, Denmark, has shown that probably 1 in 4 people in the world carry the tuberculosis bacterium in the body. (2019-08-02)
MERS-CoV vaccine is safe and induces strong immunity in Army-led first-in-human trial
The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research conducted a Phase 1 first-in-human trial of a Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS CoV) vaccine candidate that was shown to be safe, well-tolerated, and induced a robust immune response comparable to response seen in survivors of natural MERS CoV infection. (2019-07-24)
How kissing as a risk factor may explain the high global incidence of gonorrhoea
In 2016, there were 87 million people diagnosed with gonorrhoea, the most antibiotic resistant of all the STIs. (2019-07-17)
Gut microbes protect against neurologic damage from viral infections
Gut microbes produce compounds that prime immune cells to destroy harmful viruses in the brain and nervous system, according to a mouse study published today in eLife. (2019-07-16)
Singapore scientists uncover mechanism behind development of viral infections
A team of researchers from the SingHealth Duke-NUS Academic Medicine Centre's Viral Research and Experimental Medicine Centre (ViREMiCS) found that immune cells undergoing stress and an altered metabolism are the reasons why some individuals become sick from viral infections while others do not, when exposed to the same virus. (2019-07-16)
Political support, strong public health systems key to eliminating measles outbreaks worldwide
Strong political support and strong public health systems are necessary to combat measles outbreaks, which are growing in frequency around the world, argue public health experts in a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-07-15)
Mad cow disease: A computational model reveals the mechanism of replication of prions
An article published in the journal PLOS Pathogens reports a realistic computational model for the structure and mechanism of replication of prions, infectious agents responsible for mad cow disease and other neurodegenerative disorders of human and animals. (2019-07-11)
Scientists identify new virus-killing protein
A new protein called KHNYN has been identified as a missing piece in a natural antiviral system that kills viruses by targeting a specific pattern in viral genomes, according to new findings published today in eLife. (2019-07-09)
World first: Homing instinct applied to stem cells show cells 'home' to cardiac tissue
In a world first, scientists have found a new way to direct stem cells to heart tissue. (2019-07-03)
Can we feed 11 billion people while preventing the spread of infectious disease?
A new article published in Nature Sustainability describes how the increase in population and the need to feed everyone will give rise to human infectious disease, a situation the authors of the paper consider 'two of the most formidable ecological and public health challenges of the 21st century.' (2019-07-02)
Standard TB tests may not detect infection in certain exposed individuals
In a study, infectious disease experts identified a large group of people who were clearly exposed to TB for more than 10 years but the two most reliable tests (TST and IGRA) came back negative on repeated tests. (2019-07-01)
Long delays prescribing new antibiotics hinder market for needed drugs
US hospitals wait over a year on average to begin prescribing newly developed antibiotics, a delay that might threaten the supply or discourage future development of needed drugs, according to a University of Wisconsin-Madison study. (2019-06-26)
New hypothesis links habitat loss and the global emergence of infectious diseases
Auburn University researchers have published a new hypothesis that could provide the foundation for new scientific studies looking into the association of habitat loss and the global emergence of infectious diseases. (2019-06-24)
NIAID scientists develop 'mini-brain' model of human prion disease
Scientists have used human skin cells to create what they believe is the first cerebral organoid system, or 'mini-brain,' for studying sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). (2019-06-14)
New insight could improve maternal vaccines that also protect newborns
Duke researchers describe a previously unidentified route for antibodies to be transferred from the mother to the fetus, illuminating a potential way to capitalize on this process to control when and how certain antibodies are shared. (2019-06-13)
Early-season hurricanes result in greater transmission of mosquito-borne infectious disease
The timing of a hurricane is one of the primary factors influencing its impact on the spread of mosquito-borne infectious diseases such as West Nile Virus, dengue, chikungunya and Zika, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2019-06-13)
Half of Ebola outbreaks undetected
An estimated half of Ebola virus disease outbreaks have gone undetected since it was discovered in 1976, according to research published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (2019-06-13)
Researcher identifies adjuvant that prevents vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease in RSV
A unique adjuvant, a substance that enhances the body's immune response to toxins and foreign matter, can prevent vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease, a sickness that has posed a major hurdle in vaccine development for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), according to a study led by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2019-06-12)
Xpert Ultra test for diagnosing TB now included in Cochrane Review
Tuberculosis causes more deaths globally than any other infectious disease and is a top 10 cause of death worldwide. (2019-06-10)
Breakthrough in chronic wasting disease research reveals distinct deer, elk prion strains
Researchers have developed a new gene-targeted approach to study chronic wasting disease in mice, allowing opportunities for research that has not previously existed. (2019-06-10)
Are American Zika strains more virulent than Pacific and Asian strains?
Over recent years, Zika virus (ZIKV) has spread eastward from Africa and Asia, leading to an epidemic in the Americas. (2019-06-06)
Immune cells play unexpected role in early tuberculosis infection
A class of immune cells called innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) mediates the body's initial defense against TB, according to a report published online today in Nature. (2019-06-05)
Many kids with pneumonia get unnecessary antibiotics, chest X-rays
Preschool children with community-acquired pneumonia often receive unnecessary tests and treatment at outpatient clinics and emergency departments, according to a nationally representative study led by Todd Florin, M.D., MSCE, from Ann & Robert H. (2019-06-04)
Understanding why virus can't replicate in human cells could improve vaccines
The identification of a gene that helps to restrict the host range of the modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) could lead to the development of new and improved vaccines against diverse infectious agents, according to a study published May 30, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Bernard Moss of the National Institutes of Health, and colleagues. (2019-05-30)
Experimental drug completely effective against Nipah virus infection in monkeys
The experimental antiviral drug remdesivir completely protected four African green monkeys from a lethal dose of Nipah virus, according to a new study in Science Translational Medicine from National Institutes of Health scientists and colleagues. (2019-05-29)
Coat of proteins makes viruses more infectious and links them to Alzheimer's disease
New research from Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet shows that viruses interact with proteins in the biological fluids of their host which results in a layer of proteins on the viral surface. (2019-05-27)
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