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Current Infectious disease News and Events

Current Infectious disease News and Events, Infectious disease News Articles.
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Vaccine reduces likelihood of severe pneumonia
A new study has found severe pneumonia decreases by 35 per cent in children who receive a vaccine against a pneumonia-causing bacteria. (2019-11-12)
Universal guideline for treating mucormycosis developed
'One World -- One Guideline': Researchers at the University of Cologne and Cologne University Hospital have launched an initiative to significantly reduce the mortality rate of the rare fungal disease mucormycosis, which afflicts 7,000 people worldwide every year. (2019-11-12)
Study reveals 'bug wars' that take place in cystic fibrosis
Scientists have revealed how common respiratory bugs that cause serious infections in people with cystic fibrosis interact together, according to a new study in eLife. (2019-11-12)
Infectious cancer in mussels spread across the Atlantic
An infectious cancer that originated in 1 species of mussel growing in the Northern Hemisphere has spread to related mussels in South America and Europe, says a new study published today in eLife. (2019-11-05)
New transmission model for Ebola predicted Uganda cases
A new risk assessment model for the transmission of Ebola accurately predicted its spread into the Republic of Uganda, according to the Kansas State University researchers who developed it. (2019-11-05)
For patients with sepsis, an infectious disease expert may reduce the risk of death
When people with severe sepsis, an extreme overreaction by the body to a serious infection, come to the emergency room (ER), they require timely, expert care to prevent organ failure and even death. (2019-10-31)
Research reveals how malaria parasite plans ahead, preparing blueprint to strike in humans
Within seconds after an infected mosquito bites, the malaria parasite navigates the host skin and blood vessels to invade the liver, where it will stay embedded until thousands of infected cells launch malaria's deadly blood-stage infection. (2019-10-31)
In unvaccinated children, 'immune amnesia' occurs in the wake of measles infection
Two separate investigations into the immune systems of 77 unvaccinated children before and after measles infection have revealed the infection can cripple immunity against viruses and bacteria for the long-term, creating a kind of 'immune amnesia' that leaves individuals more vulnerable to future infections by other pathogens. (2019-10-31)
Evidence of cross-species filovirus transmission from bats to humans
Virus spillover may be occurring between bats and humans in Nagaland, India, according to a new collaborative study by the National Centre of Biological Sciences (NCBS) in India, Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore, and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) in the USA. (2019-10-31)
Study calls for screening for drug-resistant E. coli in capsulized fecal transplants
Study recommends enhanced screening for drug-resistant E. coli in capsulized fecal transplants. (2019-10-30)
New insight on how bacteria evolve drug resistance could lead to improved antibiotic therapies
Researchers have provided new insight into a mechanism behind the evolution of antibiotic resistance in a type of bacterium that causes severe infections in humans. (2019-10-29)
Think you're allergic to penicillin? You are probably wrong
More than 30 million people in the United States wrongly believe they are allergic to penicillin. (2019-10-29)
Journal articles explore fatal consequences of immigrant detention policies, conditions
An analysis and related commentary published in Clinical Infectious Diseases today provide in-depth examination of the deplorable and dangerous conditions in US immigrant detention centers where seven children have died in the last 10 months. (2019-10-23)
Mathematical modelling vital to tackling disease outbreaks
Predicting and controlling disease outbreaks would be easier and more reliable with the wider application of mathematical modelling, according to a new study. (2019-10-17)
New effective vaccines for Lyme disease are coming
There is no effective vaccine currently available to prevent Lyme disease in humans. (2019-10-17)
Researchers uncover novel virus type that may shed light on viral evolution
Viruses are non-living creatures, consisting of genetic material encased in a protein coat. (2019-10-16)
NIH scientists develop test for uncommon brain diseases
National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists have developed an ultrasensitive new test to detect abnormal forms of the protein tau associated with uncommon types of neurodegenerative diseases called tauopathies. (2019-10-16)
Scientists work toward a rapid point-of-care diagnostic test for Lyme disease
A study published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology describes a new rapid assay for Lyme disease that could lead to a practical test for use by healthcare providers. (2019-10-16)
Predicting Ebola outbreaks by understanding how ecosystems influence human health
The next Ebola outbreak could be predicted using a new UCL-developed model that tracks how changes to ecosystems and human societies combine to affect the spread of the deadly infectious disease (2019-10-15)
Tiny droplets allow bacteria to survive daytime dryness on leaves
Microscopic droplets on the surface of leaves give refuge to bacteria that otherwise may not survive during the dry daytime, according to a new study published today in eLife. (2019-10-15)
Increased risk of tularemia as the climate changes
Researchers at Stockholm University have developed a method for statistically predicting impacts of climate change on outbreaks of tularemia in humans. (2019-10-15)
Infectious disease in marine life linked to decades of ocean warming
New research shows that long-term changes in diseases in ocean species coincides with decades of widespread environmental change. (2019-10-09)
New study is 'chilling commentary' on future of antibiotics
The health care market is failing to support new antibiotics used to treat some of the world's most dangerous, drug-resistant 'superbugs,' according to a new analysis by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine infectious disease scientists. (2019-10-07)
Ingestible sensor allows patients to be independent but still supported during TB treatment
Ingestible sensor enables patients to take tuberculosis drugs independently and receive timely support from medical staff. (2019-10-04)
Household bleach inactivates chronic wasting disease prions
A 5-minute soak in a 40% solution of household bleach decontaminated stainless steel wires coated with chronic wasting disease (CWD) prions, according to a new study published in PLOS One. (2019-10-04)
Preaching the benefits of vaccination in an increasingly skeptical world
The jam-packed schedule for IDWeek2019 includes presentations about vaccines and other therapies that are effective against infectious diseases, new research insights about emerging infections and updates about global outbreaks past and present, such as measles and Zika. (2019-10-02)
Protozoans and pathogens make for an infectious mix
The new observation that strains of V. cholerae can be expelled into the environment after being ingested by protozoa, and that these bacteria are then primed for colonisation and infection in humans, could help explain why cholera is so persistent in aquatic environments. (2019-10-01)
Emerging parasitic disease mimics the symptoms of visceral leishmaniasis in people
A new study suggests that transmission of a protozoan parasite from insects may also cause leishmaniasis-like symptoms in people. (2019-10-01)
For hospitalized patients with fungal infections, specialists save lives
Fungal bloodstream infections are responsible for the deaths of more than 10,000 people every year. (2019-09-25)
Many patients not receiving first-line treatment for sinus, throat, ear infections
Investigators have now shown that only half of patients presenting with sinus, throat, or ear infections at different treatment centers received the recommended first-line antibiotics, well below the industry standard of 80 percent. (2019-09-25)
Tapeworms need to keep their head to regenerate
Scientists have identified the stem cells that allow tapeworms to regenerate and found that their location in proximity to the head is essential, according to a new study in eLife. (2019-09-24)
Changes in internal medicine subspecialty choices of women, men
This study used enrollment data to examine changes in the internal medicine subspecialty choices of women and men from 1991 to 2016. (2019-09-23)
New Penn-developed vaccine prevents herpes in mice, guinea pigs
A novel vaccine developed at Penn Medicine protected almost all mice and guinea pigs exposed to the herpes virus. (2019-09-20)
Towards better hand hygiene for flu prevention
Rubbing hands with ethanol-based sanitizers should provide a formidable defense against infection from flu viruses, which can thrive and spread in saliva and mucus. (2019-09-18)
Researchers find building mutations into Ebola virus protein disrupts ability to cause disease
Creating mutations in a key Ebola virus protein that helps the deadly virus escape from the body's defenses can make the virus unable to produce sickness and activate protective immunity in the infected host, according to a study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2019-09-17)
'Asexual' Chagas parasite found to sexually reproduce
The parasite that causes Chagas disease, which had largely been thought to be asexual, has been shown to reproduce sexually after scientists uncovered clues hidden in its genomic code. (2019-09-10)
NIAID officials call for innovative research on sexually transmitted infections
Sexually transmitted infections, or STIs, pose a significant public health challenge. (2019-09-09)
Research warns of the far-reaching consequences of measles epidemic and failure to vaccinate
The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) 5th Vaccine Conference will hear that the risks of failing to vaccinate children may extend far beyond one specific vaccine, although currently the most urgent problem to address is the resurgence of measles. (2019-09-05)
Cell-free DNA detects pathogens and quantifies damage
A new Cornell study, 'A Cell-Free DNA Metagenomic Sequencing Assay that Integrates the Host Injury Response to Infection,' published Aug. (2019-08-29)
Graphene shield shows promise in blocking mosquito bites
An innovative graphene-based film helps shield people from disease-carrying mosquitos, according to a new study funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2019-08-26)
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