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Current Infectious diseases News and Events

Current Infectious diseases News and Events, Infectious diseases News Articles.
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AI-guided robotics enable automation of complex synthetic biological molecules
This article describes a platform that combines artificial intelligence-driven synthesis planning, flow chemistry and a robotically controlled experimental platform to minimize the need for human intervention in the synthesis of small organic molecules. (2019-09-17)
Researchers find building mutations into Ebola virus protein disrupts ability to cause disease
Creating mutations in a key Ebola virus protein that helps the deadly virus escape from the body's defenses can make the virus unable to produce sickness and activate protective immunity in the infected host, according to a study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2019-09-17)
Starting HIV treatment in ERs may be key to ending HIV spread worldwide
In a follow-up study conducted in South Africa, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have evidence that hospital emergency departments (EDs) worldwide may be key strategic settings for curbing the spread of HIV infections in hard-to-reach populations if the EDs jump-start treatment and case management as well as diagnosis of the disease. (2019-09-16)
Too much of a good thing: Overactive immune cells trigger inflammation
Scientists describe a previously unknown disorder of the immune system: in a distinct subset of immune cells from patients with primary immunodeficiency, cellular respiration is significantly increased. (2019-09-16)
The 'pathobiome' -- a new understanding of disease
Cefas and University of Exeter scientists have presented a novel concept describing the complex microbial interactions that lead to disease in plants, animals and humans. (2019-09-12)
Few people with peanut allergy tolerate peanut after stopping oral immunotherapy
Studies have shown that peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) -- ingesting small, controlled amounts of peanut protein -- can desensitize adults and children and prevent allergic reactions, but the optimal duration and dose is unknown. (2019-09-12)
Can a DNA construction kit replace expensive antibody medication?
Researchers at KU Leuven in Belgium have developed a technique to make sheep produce new antibodies simply by injecting the DNA building blocks. (2019-09-11)
Papillomaviruses may be able to be spread by blood
Researchers found that rabbit and mouse papillomaviruses could be transferred by blood to their respective hosts, raising the possibility that human papillomavirus (HPV) may also be transferable by blood in humans. (2019-09-11)
Research shows 80% drop in ICU bloodstream infections
Bloodstream infections acquired in UK Intensive Care Units (ICUs) reduced by 80% between 2007 and 2012, according to research funded by the NIHR Guy's and St Thomas' Biomedical Research Centre. (2019-09-10)
'Asexual' Chagas parasite found to sexually reproduce
The parasite that causes Chagas disease, which had largely been thought to be asexual, has been shown to reproduce sexually after scientists uncovered clues hidden in its genomic code. (2019-09-10)
Prolonged antibiotic treatment may alter preterm infants' microbiome
Treating preterm infants with antibiotics for more than 20 months appears to promote the development of multidrug-resistant gut bacteria, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. (2019-09-09)
NIAID officials call for innovative research on sexually transmitted infections
Sexually transmitted infections, or STIs, pose a significant public health challenge. (2019-09-09)
Allergic diseases increase the risk of adult-onset asthma
A Finnish study found that the more allergic diseases an individual has, the higher the asthma risk. (2019-09-06)
Disrupting the gut microbiome may affect some immune responses to flu vaccination
The normal human gut microbiome is a flourishing community of microorganisms, some of which can affect the human immune system. (2019-09-06)
Research warns of the far-reaching consequences of measles epidemic and failure to vaccinate
The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) 5th Vaccine Conference will hear that the risks of failing to vaccinate children may extend far beyond one specific vaccine, although currently the most urgent problem to address is the resurgence of measles. (2019-09-05)
Researchers identify biomarker to predict if someone infected with malaria will get sick
Increased p53, the well-known tumor-suppressor protein, can predict whether malaria-infected children will develop fever or other symptoms, suggests a study publishing Sept. (2019-09-03)
Mumps study shows immunity gaps among vaccinated people
Immunity against mumps virus appears insufficient in a fraction of college-aged people who were vaccinated in childhood, research from Emory and CDC indicates. (2019-09-02)
Cell-free DNA detects pathogens and quantifies damage
A new Cornell study, 'A Cell-Free DNA Metagenomic Sequencing Assay that Integrates the Host Injury Response to Infection,' published Aug. (2019-08-29)
Molecular big data, a new weapon for medicine
Being able to visualize the transmission of a virus in real-time during an outbreak, or to better adapt cancer treatment on the basis of the mutations present in a tumor's individual cells are only two examples of what molecular Big Data can bring to medicine and health globally. (2019-08-28)
Alberta researchers find elusive key to stopping neglected tropical diseases
Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America. (2019-08-26)
Graphene shield shows promise in blocking mosquito bites
An innovative graphene-based film helps shield people from disease-carrying mosquitos, according to a new study funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2019-08-26)
Physicians slow to use effective new antibiotics against superbugs
New, more effective antibiotics are being prescribed in only about a quarter of infections by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), a family of the world's most intractable drug-resistant bacteria, according to an analysis by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. (2019-08-26)
Researchers identify key areas of measles virus polymerase to target for antiviral drug development
Targeting specific areas of the measles virus polymerase, a protein complex that copies the viral genome, can effectively fight the measles virus and be used as an approach to developing new antiviral drugs to treat the serious infectious disease, according to a study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University published in PLoS Pathogens. (2019-08-22)
'Malaria cell atlas' reveals gene clusters, possible drug targets
After performing single-cell RNA sequencing on thousands of malaria parasites -- the genomes of which have historically encoded many uncharacterized genes -- researchers report the first high-resolution atlas of malaria parasite gene expression across the entirety of these organisms' complex lifecycles. (2019-08-22)
Memory T cells shelter in bone marrow, boosting immunity in mice with restricted diets
Even when taking in fewer calories and nutrients, humans and other mammals usually remain protected against infectious diseases they have already encountered. (2019-08-22)
Health care workers unprepared for magnitude of climate change
An epidemic of chronic kidney disease that has killed tens of thousands of agricultural workers worldwide, is just one of many ailments poised to strike as a result of climate change, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus (2019-08-22)
Antibiotics report highlights stewardship, workforce, research needs
A CDC report on antibiotics use in health care US healthcare settings show progress made in promoting appropriate use of infection-fighting drugs, but strengthened and continued efforts needed. (2019-08-20)
Age-related illness risk for people living with HIV
The first large-scale review into the health outcomes of people living with HIV has found that this group has an increased risk of contracting specific diseases and illnesses, some of which are more commonly associated with ageing. (2019-08-15)
Nanocapsule reaches cancer that has spread to central nervous system in mice
Researchers developed a drug delivery system that can break through the blood-brain barrier in mice. (2019-08-14)
New insights into the mechanism of vaccine-induced T cell immunity
A team led by the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research has gained new insights into the mechanism of vaccine-induced T cell immunity, including regulation, gene expression and metabolic pathways. (2019-08-14)
Anti-viral immune discovery could lead to better vaccines
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have identified a molecular switch that impacts immune responses to viral infections, and whether or not protective antibodies are produced. (2019-08-13)
New evidence points to viral culprit in AFM child paralysis
Scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the University of California San Diego report antibody evidence in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that points to enterovirus (EV) infection as a cause for acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), a disease responsible for partially paralyzing more than 560 children in the United States since 2014. (2019-08-13)
Enterovirus antibodies detected in acute flaccid myelitis patients
A new study analyzing samples from patients with and without acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) provides additional evidence for an association between the rare but often serious condition that causes muscle weakness and paralysis, and infection with non-polio enteroviruses. (2019-08-13)
Ancient natural history of antibiotic production and resistance revealed
The study is the first to put antibiotic biosynthesis and resistance into an evolutionary context. (2019-08-12)
Lung lining fluid key to elderly susceptibility to tuberculosis disease
Texas Biomed researchers published an article in the Journal of Infectious Diseases in July 2019. (2019-08-07)
Kids might be naturally immunized after C. difficile colonization in infancy
Exposure to C. difficile in infancy produces an immune response that might protect against this gastrointestinal infection later in childhood, according to a study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases journal. (2019-08-06)
Nordic researchers: A quarter of the world's population at risk of developing tuberculosis
A new study from Aarhus University Hospital and Aarhus University, Denmark, has shown that probably 1 in 4 people in the world carry the tuberculosis bacterium in the body. (2019-08-02)
Experimental treatment slows prion disease, extends life of mice
Scientists using an experimental treatment have slowed the progression of scrapie, a degenerative central nervous disease caused by prions, in laboratory mice and greatly extended the rodents' lives, according to a new report in JCI Insight. (2019-08-01)
'Wildling' mice could help translate results in animal models to results in humans
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health developed a new mouse model that could improve the translation of research in mice into advances in human health. (2019-08-01)
New vaccine against Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) elicits strong immune response
An experimental vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), one of the leading causes of infectious disease deaths in infants, has shown early promise in a Phase 1 human clinical trial. (2019-08-01)
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