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Current Infectious diseases News and Events

Current Infectious diseases News and Events, Infectious diseases News Articles.
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Test accurately IDs people whose gonorrhea can be cured with simple oral antibiotic
A test designed by UCLA researchers can pinpoint which people with gonorrhea will respond successfully to the inexpensive oral antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which had previously been sidelined over concerns the bacterium that causes the infection was becoming resistant to it. (2020-08-07)
Potentially predictive humoral immune response markers in COVID-19 patients
Results of partnership between the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard and UW Medicine identify five markers of the humoral immune response that may be able to predict COVID-19 patient outcomes. (2020-08-07)
Study finds benefit in more frequent HIV screenings for young men who have sex with men
A new study has found that HIV screening every three months compared to annually will improve clinical outcomes and be cost-effective among high-risk young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in the United States. (2020-08-06)
Unveiled: A channel SARS-CoV-2 may use to proceed with viral replication in the host cell
By visualizing coronavirus replication in an infected host cell, researchers may have answered a long-standing question about how newly synthesized coronavirus components are able to be incorporated into fully infectious viruses. (2020-08-06)
Study examines skin diseases in older adults
In a study of 552 adults aged 70 to 93 years old, 80% of participants had at least one skin disease that required treatment, and the most common conditions were fungal skin infections, rosacea, actinic keratosis, and eczema. (2020-08-05)
Are vultures spreaders of microbes that put human health at risk?
A new analysis published in IBIS examines whether bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that are present in wild vultures cause disease in the birds, and whether vultures play a role in spreading or preventing infectious diseases to humans and other animal species. (2020-08-05)
NIH-Moderna investigational COVID-19 vaccine shows promise in mouse studies
The investigational vaccine known as mRNA-1273 protected mice from infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, according to research published today in Nature. (2020-08-05)
Land use changes may increase disease outbreak risks
Global changes in land use are disrupting the balance of wild animal communities in our environment, and species that carry diseases known to infect humans appear to be benefiting, finds a new UCL-led study published in Nature. (2020-08-05)
Warming climate may trigger more West Nile outbreaks in Southern California
A new study of captured mosquitoes in Los Angeles finds that West Nile infection is strongly associated with average temperature, and that temperatures above 73 degrees Fahrenheit are highly favorable for West Nile transmission. (2020-08-05)
Decoy receptor neutralizes coronavirus in cell cultures
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread, scientists and health care providers are seeking ways to keep the coronavirus from infecting tissues once they're exposed. (2020-08-04)
Identification of a new mechanism in the immune system provides knowledge about diseases
A recently identified mechanism in the immune system reveals a previously unknown protein that could provide an opening to a better understanding of infections and autoimmune diseases. (2020-08-04)
Experts issue back-to-school guidelines for pediatric solid organ transplant recipients
As school districts look ahead to a very different school year, pediatric infectious disease experts from across the United States convened to outline back-to-school safety guidelines for solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. (2020-08-04)
Better outcomes in severe COVID-19 patients administered interleukin-6 inhibitors early
New research from Boston Medical Center found that patients experiencing severe COVID-19 symptoms had improved outcomes when administered an Interleukin-6 (IL6ri) inhibitor, sarilumab or tocilizumab, given to mediate severe systemic inflammatory responses. (2020-08-04)
Children's National Hospital case report sounds the alarm for antibiotic resistance
A recent meningitis case at Children's National Hospital raises serious concerns about antibiotic resistance in the common bacterium that caused it, researchers from the hospital write in a case report. (2020-08-03)
Study reveals COVID-19 transmission rate on trains
A study by scientists from the University of Southampton has examined the chances of catching COVID-19 in a train carriage carrying an infectious person. (2020-07-31)
Young kids could spread COVID-19 as much as older children and adults
A study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago discovered that children younger than 5 years with mild to moderate COVID-19 have much higher levels of genetic material for the virus in the nose compared to older children and adults. (2020-07-30)
Rapid antibody development yields possible treatment for yellow fever
Researchers have developed a potential treatment for yellow fever. The drug, a purified antibody that targets the virus, has shown success in early-stage clinical trials in Singapore. (2020-07-29)
'Good' virus for common infection
Australian researchers have shown how viruses can be used to save lives, developing the potential use of bacteriophages in bandages to treat life-threatening golden staph infections which may not respond to traditional antibiotics. (2020-07-29)
Experimental COVID-19 vaccine protects upper and lower airways in nonhuman primates
Two doses of an experimental vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) induced robust immune responses and rapidly controlled the coronavirus in the upper and lower airways of rhesus macaques exposed to SARS-CoV-2, report scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2020-07-28)
UCalgary researchers unlock new insights that could help with vaccine development
Researchers at the University of Calgary have unlocked new insights that may help with vaccine development for infectious diseases such as COVID-19, malaria, and tuberculosis. (2020-07-27)
Livestock expansion is a factor in global pandemics
The growth of global livestock farming is a threat to our biodiversity and also increases the health risks to both humans and domesticated animals. (2020-07-24)
Rapid COVID-19 test developed to detect neutralising antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity
As the current COVID-19 pandemic continues to adversely impact communities and economies across the world, efficiency in testing for the infection and antibodies is vital. (2020-07-24)
Kidney transplantation between people with HIV is safe, NIH study finds
Kidney transplantation from deceased donors with HIV to people living with both HIV and end-stage kidney disease is feasible and safe, investigators supported by the National Institutes of Health have found. (2020-07-23)
Tracking antibody profiles for influenza exposures across the lifespan
Immune responses to influenza exposures increase early in life, then decline in middle age, according to a study published July 23 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Bingyi Yang of the University of Florida, Steven Riley of Imperial College London, Derek Cummings of the University of Florida, and colleagues. (2020-07-23)
Phage therapy shows potential for treating prosthetic joint infections
Bacteriophages, or phages, may play a significant role in treating complex bacterial infections in prosthetic joints, according to new Mayo Clinic research. (2020-07-23)
Can social unrest, riot dynamics be modeled?
Episodes of social unrest rippled throughout Chile in 2019. Researchers specializing in economics, mathematics and physics in Chile and the U.K. banded together to explore the surprising social dynamics people were experiencing. (2020-07-21)
"Winter is coming": The influence of seasonality on pathogen emergence
Seasonal fluctuations drive the dynamics of many infectious diseases. For instance, the flu spreads more readily in winter. (2020-07-21)
New drug discoveries are closely linked to the quality of lab procedures
High-quality lab procedures are even more crucial to identifying effective drugs than previously thought, new research from the University of Bath has revealed. (2020-07-21)
Clear strategies needed to reduce bushmeat hunting
Extensive wildlife trade not only threatens species worldwide but can also lead to the transmission of zoonotic diseases. (2020-07-17)
Pesticides speed the spread of deadly waterborne pathogens
Widespread use of pesticides can speed the transmission of the debilitating disease schistosomiasis, while also upsetting the ecological balances in aquatic environments that prevent infections, finds a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. (2020-07-17)
Scientists uncover SARS-CoV-2-specific T cell immunity in recovered COVID-19 and SARS patients
The T cells, along with antibodies, are an integral part of the human immune response against viral infections due to their ability to directly target and kill infected cells. (2020-07-16)
Only a third of pediatricians fully follow guidelines on peanut allergy prevention
While 93 percent of U.S. pediatricians surveyed were aware of the national guidelines on peanut allergy prevention in infants, only 30 percent were fully implementing the recommended practices and 64 percent reported partial implementation, according to the study published in JAMA Network Open. (2020-07-15)
When a pandemic strikes, we still expect an ambulance
Edith Cowan University (ECU) PhD candidate and paramedic Cameron Anderson investigated community attitudes regarding the professional obligation of paramedics to respond during pandemics. (2020-07-14)
Experimental COVID-19 vaccine safe, generates immune response
An investigational vaccine, mRNA-1273, designed to protect against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, was generally well tolerated and prompted neutralizing antibody activity in healthy adults, according to interim results published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. (2020-07-14)
International recommendations for nontuberculous mycobacteria
After 13 years, international Infectious Diseases and Respiratory Medicine societies have jointly issued new recommendations for the treatment of patients with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). (2020-07-13)
Single-dose flu drug can reduce spread within households, study finds
Only 1.9% of uninfected household members who took a single dose of baloxavir marboxil came down with the flu. (2020-07-13)
Scientists evaluated the perspectives of zinc intake for COVID-19 prevention
Researchers from Sechenov University in collaboration with colleagues from Germany, Greece and Russia reviewed scientific articles on the role of zinc in the prevention and treatment of viral infections and pneumonia, with projections on those caused by SARS-CoV-2. (2020-07-13)
Commentary in Pediatrics: Children don't transmit Covid-19, schools should reopen in fall
Based on one new and three recent studies, the authors of this commentary in Pediatrics conclude that children rarely transmit Covid-19, either among themselves or to adults. (2020-07-10)
Viral dark matter exposed: Metagenome database detects phage-derived antibacterial enzyme
In a pioneer study published in Cell Host & Microbe - Researchers at Osaka City University and The Institute for Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, reported intestinal bacterial and viral metagenome information from the fecal samples of 101 healthy Japanese individuals. (2020-07-10)
COVID-19 can be transmitted in the womb, reports pediatric infectious disease journal
A baby girl in Texas -- born prematurely to a mother with COVID-19 -- is the strongest evidence to date that intrauterine (in the womb) transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can occur, reports The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, the official journal of The European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases. (2020-07-10)
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