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Current Infectious diseases News and Events

Current Infectious diseases News and Events, Infectious diseases News Articles.
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Eastern equine encephalitis virus poses emergent threat, say NIAID officials
2019 has been a particularly deadly year in the U.S. (2019-11-21)
Researchers develop a database to aid in identifying key genes for bacterial infections
A team of scientists from the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and the Centre de Regulació Genomica have created the BacFITBase database, which characterises bacterial genes relevant to the infection process in live organisms. (2019-11-19)
New clinical guideline for the treatment and prevention of drug-resistant tuberculosis
The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, European Respiratory Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America have published an official clinical guideline on the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) in the Nov. (2019-11-18)
Gut microbiota imbalance promotes the onset of colorectal cancer
Researchers have demonstrated that an imbalance in the gut microbiota, also known as 'dysbiosis', promotes the onset of colorectal cancer. (2019-11-18)
HIV drug exposure in womb may increase child risk of microcephaly, developmental delays
Children born to women on HIV therapy containing the drug efavirenz were 2 to 2.5 times more likely to have microcephaly, or small head size, compared to children born to women on regimens of other antiretroviral drugs, according to an analysis funded by the National Institutes of Health. (2019-11-18)
Tailored T-cell therapies neutralize viruses that threaten kids with PID
Tailored T-cells specially designed to combat a half dozen viruses are safe and may be effective in preventing and treating multiple viral infections, according to research led by Children's National Hospital faculty presented during a symposium jointly led by Children's National and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. (2019-11-18)
Mild Zika infection in fetuses may cause brain abnormalities in young despite no symptoms
Using a relevant animal model (pigs), University of Saskatchewan researchers have shown that mild Zika virus infection in fetuses can cause abnormal brain development in apparently healthy young animals. (2019-11-15)
Vaccine reduces likelihood of severe pneumonia
A new study has found severe pneumonia decreases by 35 per cent in children who receive a vaccine against a pneumonia-causing bacteria. (2019-11-12)
Universal guideline for treating mucormycosis developed
'One World -- One Guideline': Researchers at the University of Cologne and Cologne University Hospital have launched an initiative to significantly reduce the mortality rate of the rare fungal disease mucormycosis, which afflicts 7,000 people worldwide every year. (2019-11-12)
Study vaccine protects monkeys against four types of hemorrhagic fever viruses
Scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health have developed an investigational vaccine that protected cynomolgus macaques against four types of hemorrhagic fever viruses endemic to overlapping regions in Africa. (2019-11-08)
Genetic diversity facilitates cancer therapy
Cancer patients with more different HLA genes respond better to treatment. (2019-11-08)
Researchers discover new toxin that impedes bacterial growth
The researchers determined that the rapid production of (p)ppApp by this enzyme toxin depletes cells of a molecule called ATP. (2019-11-06)
Infectious cancer in mussels spread across the Atlantic
An infectious cancer that originated in 1 species of mussel growing in the Northern Hemisphere has spread to related mussels in South America and Europe, says a new study published today in eLife. (2019-11-05)
New transmission model for Ebola predicted Uganda cases
A new risk assessment model for the transmission of Ebola accurately predicted its spread into the Republic of Uganda, according to the Kansas State University researchers who developed it. (2019-11-05)
NIH researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children have sesame allergy
Investigators at the National Institutes of Health have found that sesame allergy is common among children with other food allergies, occurring in an estimated 17% of this population. (2019-11-04)
For patients with sepsis, an infectious disease expert may reduce the risk of death
When people with severe sepsis, an extreme overreaction by the body to a serious infection, come to the emergency room (ER), they require timely, expert care to prevent organ failure and even death. (2019-10-31)
Measles infection wipes our immune system's memory leaving us vulnerable to other diseases
Scientists have shown how measles causes long-term damage to the immune system, leaving people vulnerable to other infections. (2019-10-31)
In unvaccinated children, 'immune amnesia' occurs in the wake of measles infection
Two separate investigations into the immune systems of 77 unvaccinated children before and after measles infection have revealed the infection can cripple immunity against viruses and bacteria for the long-term, creating a kind of 'immune amnesia' that leaves individuals more vulnerable to future infections by other pathogens. (2019-10-31)
Evidence of cross-species filovirus transmission from bats to humans
Virus spillover may be occurring between bats and humans in Nagaland, India, according to a new collaborative study by the National Centre of Biological Sciences (NCBS) in India, Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore, and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) in the USA. (2019-10-31)
Cannabis use disorder is declining among young adolescents and young adults
The prevalence of cannabis use disorder decreased in 2002 to 2016 among frequent users. (2019-10-30)
Study calls for screening for drug-resistant E. coli in capsulized fecal transplants
Study recommends enhanced screening for drug-resistant E. coli in capsulized fecal transplants. (2019-10-30)
Think you're allergic to penicillin? You are probably wrong
More than 30 million people in the United States wrongly believe they are allergic to penicillin. (2019-10-29)
Broadly protective antibodies could lead to better flu treatments and vaccines
A newly-identified set of three antibodies could lead to better treatments and vaccines against influenza, according to a paper published in Science. (2019-10-25)
Ending HIV will require optimizing treatment and prevention tools, say NIH experts
Optimal implementation of existing HIV prevention and treatment tools and continued development of new interventions are essential to ending the HIV pandemic, National Institutes of Health experts write in a commentary in Clinical Infectious Diseases. (2019-10-24)
Rare diseases: Over 300 million patients affected worldwide
Rare diseases represent a global problem. Until now, the lack of data made it difficult to estimate their prevalence. (2019-10-24)
Researchers discover 4 new strains of human adenovirus
Large-scale study to identify human adenovirus genotypes in Singapore leads to discovery of four new adenovirus strains and increase in strains linked to severe diseases. (2019-10-24)
A weapon to make a superbug to become more deadly
A recent research from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has discovered an easily transmitted DNA piece that can make a new type of hyper-resistant and deadly superbug become hyper-virulent quickly, posing an unprecedented threat to human health. (2019-10-23)
Journal articles explore fatal consequences of immigrant detention policies, conditions
An analysis and related commentary published in Clinical Infectious Diseases today provide in-depth examination of the deplorable and dangerous conditions in US immigrant detention centers where seven children have died in the last 10 months. (2019-10-23)
Candidate Ebola vaccine still effective when highly diluted, macaque study finds
A single dose of a highly diluted VSV-Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccine -- approximately one-millionth of what is in the vaccine being used to help control the ongoing Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo -- remains fully protective against disease in experimentally infected monkeys, according to NIH scientists. (2019-10-18)
Mathematical modelling vital to tackling disease outbreaks
Predicting and controlling disease outbreaks would be easier and more reliable with the wider application of mathematical modelling, according to a new study. (2019-10-17)
Researchers uncover novel virus type that may shed light on viral evolution
Viruses are non-living creatures, consisting of genetic material encased in a protein coat. (2019-10-16)
NIH scientists develop test for uncommon brain diseases
National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists have developed an ultrasensitive new test to detect abnormal forms of the protein tau associated with uncommon types of neurodegenerative diseases called tauopathies. (2019-10-16)
Scientists work toward a rapid point-of-care diagnostic test for Lyme disease
A study published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology describes a new rapid assay for Lyme disease that could lead to a practical test for use by healthcare providers. (2019-10-16)
Predicting Ebola outbreaks by understanding how ecosystems influence human health
The next Ebola outbreak could be predicted using a new UCL-developed model that tracks how changes to ecosystems and human societies combine to affect the spread of the deadly infectious disease (2019-10-15)
Increased risk of tularemia as the climate changes
Researchers at Stockholm University have developed a method for statistically predicting impacts of climate change on outbreaks of tularemia in humans. (2019-10-15)
Public reporting on aortic valve surgeries has decreased access, study finds
Public reporting on aortic valve replacement outcomes has resulted in fewer valve surgeries for people with endocarditis, a new study has found. (2019-10-11)
Infectious disease in marine life linked to decades of ocean warming
New research shows that long-term changes in diseases in ocean species coincides with decades of widespread environmental change. (2019-10-09)
Household bleach inactivates chronic wasting disease prions
A 5-minute soak in a 40% solution of household bleach decontaminated stainless steel wires coated with chronic wasting disease (CWD) prions, according to a new study published in PLOS One. (2019-10-04)
Analysis of HIV-1B in Indonesia illuminates transmission dynamics of the virus
Research into the molecular phylogeny (evolutionary history) of the HIV-1B virus in Indonesia has succeeded in illuminating the transmission period and routes for three clades (main branches of the virus). (2019-10-03)
Preaching the benefits of vaccination in an increasingly skeptical world
The jam-packed schedule for IDWeek2019 includes presentations about vaccines and other therapies that are effective against infectious diseases, new research insights about emerging infections and updates about global outbreaks past and present, such as measles and Zika. (2019-10-02)
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