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Current Injury News and Events, Injury News Articles.
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Cannabis in Michigan: New report documents trends before recreational legalization
Nearly twelve years ago, Michigan voters approved the use of medical cannabis by residents with certain health conditions. (2020-06-04)
Eye injury sets immune cells on surveillance to protect the lens
The discovery further challenges the accepted scientific dogma that the lens is shut out from the immune protection. (2020-05-26)
CU researchers publish study on nerve cell repair in Nature Neuroscience
Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have identified a new way that cells in the central nervous system regenerate and repair following damage. (2020-05-18)
AI successfully used to identify different types of brain injuries
Researchers have developed an AI algorithm that can detect and identify different types of brain injuries. (2020-05-14)
New hope for ACL injuries: Adding eccentric exercises could improve physical therapy outcomes
People with anterior cruciate ligament injuries can lose up to 40% of the muscle strength in the affected leg--with muscle atrophy remaining a big problem even after ACL reconstruction and physical therapy. (2020-05-13)
Study shows how memory function could be preserved after brain injury
study examining the effect of the immune receptor known as Toll-like Receptor 4, or TLR4, on how memory functions in both the normal and injured brain has found vastly different cellular pathways contribute to the receptor's effects on excitability in the uninjured and injured brain. (2020-05-12)
Stem cells shown to delay their own death to aid healing
A new study shows how stem cells -- which can contribute to creating many parts of the body, not just one organ or body part -- are able to postpone their own death in order to respond to an injury that needs their attention. (2020-05-07)
A new biomarker for the aging brain
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan have identified changes in the aging brain related to blood circulation. (2020-05-06)
Research suggests new therapeutic target for kidney diseases
Researchers have published a new study that suggests a signaling pathway called ROBO2 is a therapeutic target for kidney diseases, specifically kidney podocyte injury and glomerular diseases. (2020-05-04)
Non-fatal injuries cost US $1,590 and 11 days off work per injured employee every year
Non-fatal injuries in the US add up to an estimated $1,590 and an average of 11 days off work per injured employee every year, indicates an analysis of medical insurance claims and productivity data, published online in the journal Injury Prevention. (2020-05-04)
Children in rural communities at risk for poor lawnmower injury outcomes
Children in rural communities are 1.7 times more likely to undergo an amputation after a lawnmower injury than children in urban communities, according to a new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). (2020-05-01)
Certain scores may predict which trauma patients face high risk of multiple infections
A team at Massachusetts General Hospital has found that certain scores already used to assess the severity of a trauma patient's condition can provide clues to their risk for multiple infections. (2020-05-01)
Clinicians warn of the dangers of equating COVID-19 with high altitude pulmonary edema
Early reports of COVID-19 symptoms and the compelling need to quickly identify treatment options and curb the growing number of critically ill patients have led to erroneous and potentially dangerous comparisons between COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases like high altitude pulmonary edema, or HAPE. (2020-04-30)
Temple scientists regenerate neurons in mice with spinal cord injury and optic nerve damage
Each year thousands of patients face life-long losses in sensation and motor function from spinal cord injury and related conditions in which axons are badly damaged or severed. (2020-04-30)
COVID-19 personal protective equipment causes serious skin injuries
A new study of medical staff treating COVID-19-infected patients found 42.8% experienced serious skin injury related to the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), including masks, goggles, face shields, and protective gowns. (2020-04-30)
Simple 'sniff test' reliably predicts recovery of severely brain injured patients
The ability to detect smells predicts recovery and long-term survival in patients who have suffered severe brain injury, a new study has found. (2020-04-29)
Researchers restore injured man's sense of touch using brain-computer interface technology
On April 23 in the journal Cell, a team of researchers report that they have been able to restore sensation to the hand of a research participant with a severe spinal cord injury using a brain-computer interface (BCI) system. (2020-04-23)
Spinal cord injury increases risk for mental health disorders
A new study finds adults with traumatic spinal cord injury are at an increased risk of developing mental health disorders and secondary chronic diseases compared to adults without the condition. (2020-04-21)
Lung injury in COVID-19 is not high altitude pulmonary edema
A group of researchers with experience in treating high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) have written to correct the misconception in medical social media forums and elsewhere that the lung injury seen in COVID-19 is not like typical acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is instead like HAPE. (2020-04-20)
Researchers discover treatment for spasticity in mice, following spinal cord injuries
In experiments with mice, researchers have studied neuronal mechanisms and found a way to by and large prevent spasticity from developing after spinal cord injuries. (2020-04-16)
Many women vets report adverse pregnancy outcomes, postpartum mental health problems after leaving military service
Women Veterans with more symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or moral injury (guilt, shame or demoralization in response to participating in or witnessing events that violate one's sense of right and wrong), are at greater risk for negative pregnancy outcomes and postpartum depression in the three years following discharge from military service. (2020-04-15)
Temple treats 1st patient in US in trial of gimsilumab for patients with COVID-19 and ARDS
Temple University Hospital has treated the first patient in the United States in the BREATHE clinical trial evaluating the impact of intravenous treatment with gimsilumab on mortality for patients with COVID-19 and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (2020-04-15)
PTSD and moral injury linked to pregnancy complications
Elevated symptoms of PTSD and moral injury can lead to pregnancy complications, found a Veterans Affairs study of women military veterans. (2020-04-14)
Keratin scaffolds could advance regenerative medicine and tissue engineering for humans
Researchers at Mossakowski Medical Research Center of the Polish Academy of Science have developed a simple method for preparing 3D keratin scaffold models which can be used to study the regeneration of tissue. (2020-04-14)
Physically active older veterans fall more, but hurt themselves less
Active older veterans fall more often than their more sedentary peers who never served in the armed forces, but they're less likely to injure themselves when they do, says a University of Michigan researcher. (2020-04-14)
First in-human study of drug targeting brain inflammation supports further development
MW189 blocks abnormal inflammation in the brain that is known to contribute to injury- and disease-induced neurologic impairments in a number of acute and chronic brain disorders. (2020-04-09)
Mayo Clinic offer guidance on treating COVID-19 patients with signs of acute heart attack
Much remains unknown about COVID-19, but many studies already have indicated that people with cardiovascular disease are at greater risk of COVID-19. (2020-04-09)
Neuropsychological and psychological methods are essential
Clinical neuropsychology and psychology have evolved as diagnostic and treatment-oriented disciplines necessary for individuals with neurological, psychiatric, and medical conditions. (2020-04-08)
Off-the-shelf artificial cardiac patch repairs heart attack damage in rats, pigs
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed an 'off-the-shelf' artificial cardiac patch that can deliver cardiac cell-derived healing factors directly to the site of heart attack injury. (2020-04-08)
Some flowers have learned to bounce back after injury
Some flowers have a remarkable and previously unknown ability to bounce back after injury, according to a new study. (2020-04-07)
Men pose more risk to other road users than women
Men pose more risk to other road users than women do and they are more likely to drive more dangerous vehicles, reveals the first study of its kind, published online in the journal Injury Prevention. (2020-04-06)
Chilling concussed cells shows promise for full recovery
In the future, treating a concussion could be as simple as cooling the brain. (2020-04-02)
Researchers reverse muscle fibrosis from overuse injury in animals, hope for human trials
High-force, high-repetition movements create microinjuries in muscle fibers. Muscle tissue responds by making repairs. (2020-03-30)
Cells must age for muscles to regenerate in muscle-degenerating diseases
Exercise can only improve strength in muscle-degenerating diseases when a specific type of muscle cell ages, report a Hokkaido University researcher and colleagues with Sapporo Medical University in Japan. (2020-03-30)
How tissues harm themselves during wound healing
Researchers from Osaka University discovered that increased expression of Rbm7 in apoptotic tissue cells results in the recruitment of segregated-nucleus-containing atypical monocytes, leading to tissue fibrosis. (2020-03-25)
Stroke: When the system fails for the second time
After a stroke, there is an increased risk of suffering a second one. (2020-03-23)
Kidney injury risks higher for hospitalized pregnant women
New research from the University of Cincinnati shows an increased rate of sudden episodes of kidney failure or damage in women who are hospitalized during pregnancy. (2020-03-18)
New strategies for managing bowel and bladder dysfunction after spinal cord injury
Two complications have emerged as top priorities for spinal cord injury researchers -- neurogenic bowel and neurogenic bladder. (2020-03-12)
Sensing infection, suppressing regeneration
UIC researchers describe an enzyme that blocks the ability of blood vessel cells to self-heal. (2020-03-11)
Cycling to work linked to higher risk of injury-related hospitalization among UK commuters
Cycling to work is associated with a higher risk of admission to hospital for an injury than other modes of commuting, suggests a UK study published in The BMJ today. (2020-03-11)
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