Current Intensive care News and Events

Current Intensive care News and Events, Intensive care News Articles.
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Sheep show the contamination by microplastics in the agricultural soils of Murcia
A team from the Diverfarming project has found microplastics in 92% of the faeces of sheep fed in intensive agricultural zones of Murcia that they analysed (2020-11-25)

Doctors use existing treatment earlier to save the lives of Covid-19 patients
The lives of patients hospitalised with COVID-19 are being saved by doctors who are using an existing medical treatment at an earlier stage. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) in the first days of hospitalisation seems to save between 10% to 20% of patients. The researchers also found that the early use of CPAP potentially reduces lung damage during the worst of the COVID-19 infection and allows the patient to recover from the inflammatory effects. (2020-11-25)

Study shows protective role sex steroids play in COVID-19
''Sex and Covid-19: A protective role for reproductive steroids,'' by Graziano Pinna, research associate professor in psychiatry, analyzes existing research to look at reasons why COVID-19 symptom severity and mortality are more frequent in men than in women and in older people. His paper suggests female reproductive steroids play a protective role. (2020-11-24)

Research shows bariatric surgery may reduce severity of COVID-19 in patients with obesity
A Cleveland Clinic study shows that among patients who have obesity and who tested positive for COVID-19, a past history of bariatric surgery was significantly associated with a lower risk of hospital and intensive care unit admission. The results were published in the journal of Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases. (2020-11-24)

Diabetic eye disease associated with five-fold risk of severe COVID-19
People with diabetes and eye disease have a five-fold increased risk of requiring intubation when hospitalised with COVID-19. (2020-11-23)

Study evaluates new World Health Organization Labor Care Guide for maternity care providers
The World Health Organization developed the new Labor Care Guide to support clinicians in providing good quality, women-centered care during labor and childbirth. In a study published in Birth, researchers evaluated the usability, feasibility, and acceptability of the new Labor Care Guide for maternity care providers in six countries. (2020-11-20)

Eye protection for patients with COVID-19 undergoing prolonged prone-position ventilation
Researchers report two cases of ophthalmic clinical examination findings in patients who underwent prolonged prone positioning in the intensive care unit during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-11-19)

Insights in the search for new antibiotics
A collaborative research team from the University of Oklahoma, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Merck & Co. published an opinion article in the journal, Nature Chemical Biology, that addresses the gap in the discovery of new antibiotics. (2020-11-19)

61 healthcare groups urge Congress to support implementing the physician fee schedule
Today, more than 60 healthcare stakeholders, representing Medicare providers, signed a letter urging congressional leaders to support bipartisan legislation that would implement the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service's (CMS) Calendar Year 2021 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) final rule as written. (2020-11-17)

Health care workers most at risk for COVID-19
Health care workers -- particularly nurses -- have a higher prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection than non-health care workers, according to researchers at Rutgers, which released baseline results from a large prospective study of participants at Rutgers and affiliated hospitals recruited during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-11-16)

Sleep apnea may be risk factor for COVID-19
The question of sleep apnea as the risk factor for COVID-19 arose in a study conducted by the Turku University Hospital and the University of Turku on patients of the first wave of the pandemic. This is the first COVID-19-related study where sleep apnea as suspected risk factor emerges as the main finding. (2020-11-13)

Study: Respiratory failure in COVID-19 usually not driven by cytokine storm
A study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis showed that, contrary to expectation, most people with severe COVID-19 do not suffer from unbridled inflammation. The findings suggest that anti-inflammatory therapies may not be helpful for most COVID-19 patients. (2020-11-13)

Best practices for mechanical ventilation in patients with ARDS, COVID-19
A team from pulmonary and critical care medicine at Michigan Medicine outlines 20 evidence-based practices shown to reduce time spent on a ventilator and death in patients with acute respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress -- conditions that have many overlaps with severe COVID-19. (2020-11-13)

Racial disparities in pediatric diabetes treatment
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the third most common pediatric chronic disease in the United States, and the risk of the disease has risen sharply in non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children in the last 20 years, data show. Ironically, the significant advances in T1D therapeutics over recent years, especially new technologies, may have exacerbated racial disparities in diabetes treatment and outcomes. (2020-11-12)

Electrical stimulation reduces swallowing problems in patients with neurological conditions
Using electrical stimulation in the throats of patients recovering from conditions such as strokes or head injuries will help to relieve swallowing problems, leading to a quicker recovery time, according to a new study. (2020-11-10)

Parents, MDs agree: genome sequencing as first-tier diagnostic benefits infants in ICU
A vast majority of doctors and parents of babies in intensive care, with diseases of unknown origin, believe genomic sequencing is beneficial in managing care, according to two new papers published by Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine. (2020-11-05)

Intensive lab experiences and online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic
For students studying ecology and evolution, it's important to experience the processes and concepts they are learning about nature in nature. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, field-based courses rapidly transitioned to online only delivery. An article published in Ecology and Evolution discusses the potential advantages of pairing an intensive lab experience with an otherwise online delivery. (2020-11-04)

Biomarker combination predicts kidney injury in critically ill children
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have identified a unique method of identifying the early signs of a potentially serious condition known as Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). (2020-11-02)

Where you get depression care matters, study finds
Research shows that collaborative care programs in which primary-care providers work with a depression care manager and a designated psychiatric consultant can more than double the likelihood of improving depression outcomes. But a new study published in Health Affairs shows that not all care is equal. (2020-11-02)

New strategies suggested for critical heart care in the ICU
Critically ill heart patients are at increased risk of complications that are potentially preventable and associated with death, longer hospital stays and higher costs. Best practices to prevent complications include meticulous hand hygiene among the health care team, prompt removal of invasive medical devices and implementing a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals from various specialties. (2020-10-29)

Study documents racial differences in US hospice use and end-of-life care preferences
In a new medical records analysis of racial disparities in end-of-life care, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and three collaborating institutions report that Black patients voluntarily seek substantially more intensive treatment in the last six months of life, while white patients more often choose hospice services. (2020-10-28)

Death rates among people with severe COVID-19 drop by a half in England
Death rates from people with severe COVID-19 in hospital have dropped to around a half of the rate at the peak of the pandemic, new research has revealed. (2020-10-27)

Black Hispanic individuals hardest hit by COVID-19
Results from a new study led by Boston Medical Center (BMC) demonstrate the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Hispanic groups within the US, with the most severe outcomes, including death and intensive care, among Hispanic Black individuals. (2020-10-27)

Serum creatinine-to- cystatin C ratio predicts mortality
In patients initiating continuous renal replacement therapy for acute kidney injury, higher serum creatinine-to-cystatin C ratios were associated with lower mortality. (2020-10-21)

Scientists develop algorithm to help relieve pressure on the NHS
New research suggests an algorithm could be used to help optimise the sharing of healthcare resources during the Covid-19 pandemic, preventing NHS intensive care units (ICU) from becoming overwhelmed. (2020-10-21)

Hospitals leaned toward strict COVID-19 NICU policies despite low prevalence of infection
Two studies examining the impact of COVID-19 on neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) found the prevalence of COVID-19 in NICU infants is low, yet many hospitals at the start of the pandemic put in place strict parental visitation policies and scaled back NICU services such as lactation support and therapy. (2020-10-21)

Examining association between early treatment with tocilizumab, risk of death among critically ill COVID-19 patients
Whether treatment with tocilizumab in the first two days after being admitted to an intensive care unit was associated with a reduced risk of death among critically ill patients with COVID-19 was investigated in this study. (2020-10-20)

Study reveals kidney disease or injury is associated with much higher risk of mortality for COVID-19 patients in ICU
New research published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) reveals the much higher risk of mortality faced by COVID-19 patients in intensive care who have chronic kidney disease (CKD) or, those who develop new (acute) kidney injury (AKI) as a result of developing COVID-19. (2020-10-16)

Brain injury survivors and their caregivers can benefit from a resiliency program
An early resiliency intervention program for survivors of acute brain injury and their caregivers has shown clinically significant improvement in emotional distress, according to a study conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). The program achieved measurable reductions in depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress among individuals with acute neurologic illness who had been hospitalized in the intensive care unit, and their caregivers. (2020-10-14)

Obesity implies risk of COVID-19 regardless of age, sex, ethnicity and health condition
Conclusion presented by Brazilian researchers in Obesity Research & Clinical Practice is based on analysis of nine clinical studies involving 6,577 patients infected by SARS-CoV-2 in five countries. (2020-10-14)

A call for more comprehensive smoking cessation programs for cancer patients who smoke
In an editorial published in JAMA, UNC Lineberger's Adam Goldstein, MD, MPH, director of the UNC Tobacco Treatment Programs and professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Family Medicine, and his co-authors called for more funding and better reimbursement for smoking cessation counseling for cancer patients who smoke. (2020-10-13)

Long-term, frequent phone counseling helps cancer patients who smoke quit
Recently diagnosed cancer patients who smoke are significantly more likely to quit and remain tobacco-free if they receive frequent and sustained telephone counseling, according to a new study. The study offers hope that these patients will respond better to treatment and enjoy improved quality of life while coping with cancer. (2020-10-13)

First reported UK case of sudden permanent hearing loss linked to COVID-19
Although uncommon, sudden permanent hearing loss seems to be linked to COVID-19 infection in some people, warn doctors, reporting the first UK case in the journal BMJ Case Reports. (2020-10-13)

COVID-19 recovery at home possible for most patients
A new study shows that the vast majority of patients who visited the Ruth and Harry Roman Emergency Department at Cedars-Sinai with suspected COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) symptoms, and who were treated and sent home to recuperate, recovered within a week. (2020-10-12)

SNew solar panel design could lead to wider use of renewable energy
Researchers say the breakthrough could lead to the production of thinner, lighter and more flexible solar panels that could be used to power more homes and be used in a wider range of products. (2020-10-08)

COVID-19 outcomes in patients with rare inborn immune disorders
Garvan's Prof Stuart Tangye and KU Leuven's Prof Isabelle Meyts have co-led a multi-centre international consortium to assess the severity of COVID-19 in individuals with inborn errors of immunity. (2020-10-06)

High risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with COVID-19
In a systematic review of the worldwide published data on ''Venous thromboembolism (VTE) in COVID-19 patients'', researchers from the Department of Medicine I (MedUni Vienna), provide an in-depth analysis on the risk of VTE in patients hospitalised for COVID-19. While hospitalized patients at general wards have a VTE risk between 5 and 11%, the risk of developing deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism in critically ill patients is 18 to 28%. (2020-10-01)

Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with COVID-19
Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with covid-19 and is associated with poor survival, particularly among patients aged 80 or older, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-09-30)

COVID-19 may deplete testosterone, helping to explain male patients' poorer prognosis
For the first time, data from a study with patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 suggest that the disease might deteriorate men's testosterone levels. (2020-09-28)

High-intensity resistance training in post-acute care produced better outcomes and patient experience
Today, researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus released a new study evaluating the effectiveness and safety of high-intensity rehabilitation for older adults in skilled nursing facilities. ''Our study identified an impactful opportunity to improve the way we care for patients in skilled nursing facilities.'' said lead author Allison Gustavson, PT, DPT, PhD, at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-09-24)

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