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Current Intensive care News and Events

Current Intensive care News and Events, Intensive care News Articles.
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A speedier pipeline to diagnosing genetic diseases in seriously ill infants
Building on previous research, scientists have made improvements to an artificial intelligence pipeline used to diagnose genetic diseases via blood samples obtained from gravely ill infants in a San Diego-based children's hospital. (2019-04-24)
Breakthrough for children with serious epileptic seizures
Emergency medicine doctors now have a better way to treat severe epileptic seizures in children, thanks to a New Zealand-Australian study. (2019-04-17)
Study finds low hand hygiene compliance on ICUs
Healthcare workers on intensive care units (ICUs) are regularly missing opportunities to clean their hands during the care of patients, despite its critical importance for infection control, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16). (2019-04-14)
ICU patients with non-brain-related injuries may suffer undetected cognitive dysfunction
Researchers assessed 20 patients as they left the ICU and every single patient had detectable cognitive deficits in two or more cognitive areas of investigation, including memory, attention, decision-making and reasoning. (2019-04-12)
Researchers call for rethink of external NHS inspections amid questions of effectiveness
Researchers at the University of York have shown that costly external NHS hospital inspections are not associated with improvements in quality of care. (2019-04-11)
Tweeting their own horn: Author self-promotion on Twitter increases research dissemination
Researchers from the University of Toronto presented a new study at CHEST Congress 2019 Thailand in Bangkok that aimed to determine the effect of authors' self-promotion on the social media site, Twitter, in regards to the dissemination of their research. (2019-04-09)
Mass. General study provides insight into use of critical care resources
A study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found wide variation in the use of different hospital units -- intensive care or general medical units -- to deliver a type of advanced respiratory support called noninvasive ventilation. (2019-04-08)
Integrating infant mental health into the neonatal intensive care unit
Psychotherapists attend to mental health needs of NICU families, specifically focusing on the developing relationship between babies and parents. (2019-04-03)
Fast-changing genetics key to hospital superbug survival
A highly drug-resistant bacteria common in hospitals, Klebsiella pneumoniae, represents a significant antimicrobial resistance threat and should be monitored globally, say UCL researchers. (2019-04-02)
Study links insurance coverage to access to hospital care
Compared to privately insured patients, individuals who lack insurance or use Medicaid are more likely to be transferred to another hospital after receiving initial treatment in the emergency department (ED). (2019-04-01)
Lurie Children's offers kids virtual escape from intensive care unit
For the first time in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), patients get a chance to scuba dive, snowboard, and go on a safari or other adventures, all from their hospital bed. (2019-03-27)
Study examines racial segregation, inequality of care in NICUs
This observational study looked at the extent of racial segregation and inequality of care for very low-birth-weight and very preterm infants at neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) across the United States. (2019-03-25)
New model for ICU care, developed by Rutgers, discovers causes of health emergencies
A new model for intensive care, developed by Rutgers and RWJBarnabas Health System, can help identify preventable -- and previously overlooked -- factors that often send chronically ill patients to the intensive care unit (ICU). (2019-03-20)
Clinical guidelines from specialty societies often biased
Clinical practice guidelines issued by specialty societies in North America often recommend health care services linked to their specialties, in contrast with European guidelines and those from independent organizations, argues a commentary published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-03-18)
Lowering blood pressure prevents worsening brain damage in elderly
Elderly people with high blood pressure, or hypertension, who took medicine to keep their 24-hour systolic blood pressure around 130 mm Hg for three years showed significantly less accumulation of harmful brain lesions compared with those taking medicine to maintain a systolic blood pressure around 145 mm Hg, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session. (2019-03-18)
Key to successful care of pregnant women in heart failure? Team-based care, study finds
Any time a pregnant woman presents in heart failure there are risks to both mother and baby. (2019-03-16)
Blood test to diagnose heart attacks is flawed, warn researchers
The blood test used to diagnose a heart attack (acute myocardial infarction) in patients admitted to hospital can be misleading, warn researchers in a study published by The BMJ today. (2019-03-13)
Excessive hygiene promotes resistance to antibiotics
In Nature Communications, researchers from Graz in Austria present initial approaches to how the spread of antibiotic resistances can be prevented in hospitals. (2019-03-12)
Ecological vineyards help protecting bird population in the environment
Ecological farmlands help protecting bird populations and reducing the effects of global change on the environment. (2019-03-06)
New Regenstrief studies report drug focused approach insufficient to manage ICU delirium
The results of two new Regenstrief Institute trials published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society underscore and confirm the need to look to options other than medication to lower the duration or severity of delirium in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. (2019-03-05)
Results of trial to stem hospital-acquired bacterial infections published
A trial evaluated whether daily bathing with the antiseptic soap chlorhexidine (CHG) -- and in those patients with MRSA, adding the nasal antibiotic mupirocin -- more effectively reduced hospital-acquired bacterial infections than bathing with ordinary soap and water. (2019-03-05)
Traumatic brain injury and kids: New treatment guidelines issued
To help promote the highest standards of care, and improve the overall rates of survival and recovery following TBI, a panel of pediatric critical care, neurosurgery and other pediatric experts today issued the third edition of the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines for the Management of Pediatric Severe TBI. (2019-03-01)
New wireless system 'cuts the cord' from newborn patient monitoring approaches
A new, less invasive system for monitoring the vital signs of some of the world's most fragile patients -- infants born pre-term or with debilitating disease -- would allow parents skin-to-skin contact with these children when they otherwise couldn't have it. (2019-02-28)
Computer simulators show how to reduce damage to lungs of children in intensive care
Changing the ventilation settings for children on life support can reduce the risk of damage to their lungs, researchers at the University of Warwick and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia have found on computer simulated patients. (2019-02-20)
Small benefit of inducing labor over 'wait and see' approach for late-term pregnancies
Inducing labor at 41 weeks of pregnancy leads to a small reduction in birth complications compared with expectant management (a 'wait and see' approach) until 42 weeks in low risk women, finds a clinical trial published by The BMJ today. (2019-02-20)
Study finds acetaminophen significantly reduced in-hospital delirium
Patients treated with acetaminophen demonstrated a significant reduction in in-hospital delirium. (2019-02-19)
Western diet may increase risk of severe sepsis, death, study finds
A Western diet high in fat and sugar can pack on the pounds. (2019-02-11)
Is it better to have a heart attack while traveling or at home?
Is it better to have a heart attack while travelling or at home? (2019-02-08)
NIH study provides answer to long-held debate on blood sugar control after stroke
Doctors all over the world have debated whether intensive glucose management, which requires the use of IV insulin to bring blood sugar levels down to 80-130 mg/dL, or standard glucose control using insulin shots, which aims to get glucose below 180 mg/dL, lead to better outcomes after stroke. (2019-02-07)
Intensive blood pressure lowering safe for clot-buster-treated stroke patients, but...
Rapidly lowering blood pressure beyond recommended targets safely reduced the risk of bleeding as a side effect in stroke patients but did not limit post-stroke disability. (2019-02-07)
Does intensive blood pressure control reduce the risk of dementia?
Alzheimer's disease and related dementias are projected to affect 115 million people worldwide by 2050. (2019-01-28)
Quality, experience of outpatient care in US for adults with or without primary care
Adults who have primary care receive similar amounts of care as adults who don't, but they receive more high-value care, similar low-value care, and report better access and patient experiences. (2019-01-28)
Lowering blood pressure reduces risk of cognitive impairment
Intensive control of blood pressure in older people significantly reduced the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a precursor of early dementia, in a clinical trial led by scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health. (2019-01-28)
Alzheimer's Association funds two-year extension of the sprint mind study
The Alzheimer's Association has awarded more than $800,000 to support the SPRINT MIND 2.0 Study, which will further investigate the impact of intensive blood pressure treatment on reducing risk of dementia. (2019-01-28)
Decision-making tool fails to ease anxiety for families of life-support patients
Using a computer-based decision guide to plan treatment for a loved one on life support can help families feel less conflicted, but did not ease symptoms of depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress, according to new research led by Duke Health. (2019-01-28)
Flu vaccination keeps COPD patients out of the hospital
A new study published in the January issue of CHEST® establishes that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) face heightened risks of death, critical illness, and hospitalization if they develop the flu and demonstrates the beneficial effects of influenza vaccination. (2019-01-23)
Virus-based therapy targets a pediatric eye cancer
A cancer-killing, virus-based therapy showed promising effects against retinoblastoma -- a tumor of the retina that affects mainly children -- in mouse models and a pilot clinical trial. (2019-01-23)
No substantial benefit from transplantation reported for a high-risk leukemia subtype
Study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital found treatment guided by measuring minimal residual disease was associated with better outcomes for hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. (2019-01-18)
Most parents say hands-on, intensive parenting is best
Most parents say a child-centered, time-intensive approach to parenting is the best way to raise their kids, regardless of education, income or race. (2019-01-16)
Conserving large carnivores in Alaska requires overhauling state policy
Large carnivore management in Alaska should be based on rigorous science and monitoring of the status and trends of carnivore populations, according to a Perspective article published Jan. (2019-01-15)
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