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Current Internal medicine News and Events

Current Internal medicine News and Events, Internal medicine News Articles.
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Women have substantially less influence on Twitter than men in academic medicine
Women who are health policy or health services researchers face a significant disparity in social media influence compared to their male peers, according to a new study. (2019-10-14)
Medicare overpayments for graduate medical education could total $1.28 billion annually
If Medicare capped funds for Graduate Medical Education (GME) at the rate of $150,000 per resident, the move would free up more than $1 billion a year, according to a study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. (2019-10-07)
American Journal of Roentgenology finds no consensus on handling outside imaging studies
According to an ahead-of-print article published in the January issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), there is 'no consensus' among academic radiologists regarding how to handle second-opinion consultations on outside studies. (2019-10-04)
Canadians told to stop taking aspirin to prevent first heart attack, stroke
If you've never had a heart attack or stroke, you likely should not be taking aspirin to prevent them, according to new research. (2019-10-02)
Changes in internal medicine subspecialty choices of women, men
This study used enrollment data to examine changes in the internal medicine subspecialty choices of women and men from 1991 to 2016. (2019-09-23)
Study changes guidelines for sepsis management
University of Arizona Health Sciences researcher ends debate among physicians regarding sepsis management. (2019-09-17)
Study supports taking blood cultures before beginning treatment for sepsis
In a new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, a team performed a prospective study in seven centers across North America and found that blood cultures drawn after antimicrobial administration resulted in a loss of almost 50 percent of available clinical information. (2019-09-17)
Parasitology: Mother cells as organelle donors
Microbiologists at LMU and UoG have discovered a recycling process in the eukaryotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii that plays a vital role in the organism's unusual mode of reproduction. (2019-09-13)
Coffee may protect against gallstones
Drinking more coffee may help reduce the risk of developing gallstones, according to a new study published in the Journal of Internal Medicine. (2019-09-05)
Researchers find alarming risk for people coming off chronic opioid prescriptions
A recent study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine found an alarming outcome: Patients coming off opioids for pain were three times more likely to die of an overdose in the years that followed. (2019-09-05)
Planetary collisions can drop the internal pressures in planets
A new study finds that collisions between planetary bodies, such as the event that created Earth's moon, could abruptly drop the planet's internal pressure. (2019-09-04)
Oncologists echo findings that suggest a reduced risk of breast cancer recurrence
Oncologists at VCU Massey Cancer Center were invited to co-author an editorial published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology providing expert commentary on findings from a large study conducted by German investigators that a modified drug combination may lead to a decreased chance of disease recurrence for women with high risk, HER-2 negative breast cancer. (2019-08-26)
Heart attack patients with mild cognitive impairment get fewer treatments
University of Michigan research finds people with mild cognitive impairment don't always receive the same, established medical treatment that patients with normal cognitive functioning get when they have a heart attack. (2019-08-23)
Kidney transplants covered by Medicaid increased in states after Medicaid expansion
Medicaid expansion has helped more young, low-income adults with advanced kidney disease to avoid the costs and poor quality-of-life associated with dialysis, reports a study from researchers at Drexel University College of Medicine and the Dornsife School of Public Health at Drexel. (2019-08-20)
Case studies suggest that 'red flag' laws play a role in preventing mass shootings
Case studies of individuals threatening mass violence suggest that extreme risk protection orders (ERPOs), colloquially known as 'red flag' orders, may play a role in preventing mass shootings. (2019-08-19)
Survey data suggests widespread bullying by superiors in medical residency training
Using questionnaire answers from thousands of internal medicine residents, primarily from US training programs, a research team at Johns Hopkins Medicine says it has added to the evidence that bullying of medical trainees is fairly widespread. (2019-08-15)
Remove false teeth before general anesthetic, doctors warn
False teeth need to be taken out before a general anesthetic, doctors warn in the journal BMJ Case Reports after a 72-year-old's dentures got stuck in his throat during surgery to remove a harmless lump in his abdominal wall, and weren't discovered for eight days. (2019-08-12)
Study finds racial disparities in pregnancy rates for kidney transplant recipients
Research from the University of Cincinnati finds that among women who are kidney transplant recipients, Hispanic women have a higher likelihood of pregnancy than white women. (2019-08-12)
News from Annals of Internal Medicine: Organizations urge immediate action to prevent firearm-relate
The American College of Physicians (ACP) and the nation's leading physician and public health organizations called for policies to reduce firearms-related injuries and deaths in the US in a new call-to-action, 'Firearm-Related Injury and Death in the United States: A Call to Action from the Nation's Leading Physician and Public Health Professional Organizations,' published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine. (2019-08-07)
New treatment option shown for heart failure fluid overload
UT Health San Antonio clinical researchers found that giving higher doses of the diuretic spironolactone could safely and effectively treat fluid excess in heart failure patients who did not respond to other diuretics. (2019-08-02)
Designed protein switch allows unprecedented control over living cells
Scientists have created the first completely artificial protein switch that can work inside living cells to modify or even commandeer the cell's complex internal circuitry. (2019-07-24)
Survey finds patients want more guidance from physicians on self-care
Physicians and consumers agree that self-care is important to health, yet 75% of patients say they haven't discussed it with their physician within the last two years, according to a new survey released today, conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs. (2019-07-23)
Survey finds physicians struggle with their own self-care
Despite believing that self-care is a vitally important part of health and overall well-being, many physicians overlook their own self-care, according to a new survey released today, conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs. (2019-07-23)
Space research helps patients on Earth with low blood pressure condition
With the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing approaching, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers are publishing heart-related space research that helps us to understand the problem of low blood pressure. (2019-07-19)
Prescribed opioids associated with overdose risk for family members without prescriptions
Access to family members' drugs may be a strong risk factor for overdose in individuals without their own prescriptions, according to a new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital. (2019-07-16)
'The way you move': Body structure brings coordinated movement
A computer model shows that a starfish-like animal can coordinate rhythmic motion based on body structure without the brain telling them to do so. (2019-07-12)
Study probes how to tell elderly patients not to bother with cancer screening
Over the past decades, the idea that all adults should get regularly screened for cancer -- with mammograms, colonoscopies and prostate specific antigen blood tests -- has been conveyed to the public time after time. (2019-07-02)
Doctors need nutrition education, says commentary in JAMA Internal Medicine
Overweight, diabetes, heart disease, and many forms of cancer are driven by unhealthful diets, but most doctors do not have the knowledge to turn this problem around. (2019-07-02)
More women in US receive 3D mammography but disparities remain
Use of 3D mammography, an advanced form of breast cancer screening, has risen rapidly in recent years, according to Yale researchers in a new study. (2019-06-24)
Can deprescribing drugs linked to cognitive impairment actually reduce risk of dementia?
A JAMA Internal Medicine commentary by three Regenstrief Institute research scientists calls for randomized deprescribing trials to address anticholinergic drug use as a potentially modifiable and reversible risk factor for dementia, a growing public health issue. (2019-06-24)
New p53 gene discovery sheds light on how to make cancer therapies more effective
Scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center have discovered that the loss of a protein called DBC1 in breast cancer cells leads to the dysregulation of normal anti-cancer functions, contributing to cancer cell growth and resistance to therapies. (2019-06-20)
Study shows 70% of patients lack advance directives before elective surgery
Only 30% of elective surgery patients in a recent study had Advance Directives documenting their wishes regarding emergency medical care. (2019-06-17)
UTMB researchers learned how to better combat muscle loss during space flights
A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has further documented how muscles are affected by reduced gravity conditions during space flight missions and uncovered how exercise and hormone treatments can be tailored to minimize muscle loss for individual space travelers. (2019-06-13)
'Five star' hospitals often provide fewer services than other hospitals, new data suggests
If you're looking for a top-notch hospital with a wide range of services, narrowing your list to hospitals with a five-star patient experience rating might lead you astray. (2019-06-12)
The sun may have a dual personality, simulations suggest
A deep dive into the sun's interior provides new clues to the forces that govern that star's internal clock. (2019-06-11)
Mount Sinai study reports asthma control in older patients and shows lower ED visits
Mount Sinai was part of the largest clinical trial for asthma self-management support in older patients, which resulted in improved control and quality of life, and fewer emergency department visits. (2019-06-10)
For dying patients, early plans can improve quality of life
Careful documentation of a hospice patient's end-of-life wishes -- and prominently noting that information in health records early -- could prevent unwanted hospitalizations and medical interventions, a new study suggests. (2019-06-06)
Probing semiconductor crystals with a sphere of light
Tohoku University researchers have developed a technique using a hollow sphere to measure the electronic and optical properties of large semiconducting crystals. (2019-06-06)
Study follows the health of older adults with prediabetes problems
In a Journal of Internal Medicine study that followed older adults with prediabetes for 12 years, most remained stable or reverted to normal blood sugar levels, and only one-third developed diabetes or died. (2019-06-05)
Should STEMI patients recover in the ICU?
Providers need more clear guidance on whether a patient who has suffered from STEMI heart attack should recover in the intensive care unit, a new University of Michigan study, published in The BMJ, finds. (2019-06-04)
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