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Current Internal medicine News and Events

Current Internal medicine News and Events, Internal medicine News Articles.
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UTMB researchers learned how to better combat muscle loss during space flights
A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has further documented how muscles are affected by reduced gravity conditions during space flight missions and uncovered how exercise and hormone treatments can be tailored to minimize muscle loss for individual space travelers. (2019-06-13)
'Five star' hospitals often provide fewer services than other hospitals, new data suggests
If you're looking for a top-notch hospital with a wide range of services, narrowing your list to hospitals with a five-star patient experience rating might lead you astray. (2019-06-12)
The sun may have a dual personality, simulations suggest
A deep dive into the sun's interior provides new clues to the forces that govern that star's internal clock. (2019-06-11)
Mount Sinai study reports asthma control in older patients and shows lower ED visits
Mount Sinai was part of the largest clinical trial for asthma self-management support in older patients, which resulted in improved control and quality of life, and fewer emergency department visits. (2019-06-10)
For dying patients, early plans can improve quality of life
Careful documentation of a hospice patient's end-of-life wishes -- and prominently noting that information in health records early -- could prevent unwanted hospitalizations and medical interventions, a new study suggests. (2019-06-06)
Probing semiconductor crystals with a sphere of light
Tohoku University researchers have developed a technique using a hollow sphere to measure the electronic and optical properties of large semiconducting crystals. (2019-06-06)
Study follows the health of older adults with prediabetes problems
In a Journal of Internal Medicine study that followed older adults with prediabetes for 12 years, most remained stable or reverted to normal blood sugar levels, and only one-third developed diabetes or died. (2019-06-05)
Should STEMI patients recover in the ICU?
Providers need more clear guidance on whether a patient who has suffered from STEMI heart attack should recover in the intensive care unit, a new University of Michigan study, published in The BMJ, finds. (2019-06-04)
UT Southwestern develops test to predict immunotherapy response in kidney cancer
A novel imaging test shows promise for identifying kidney cancer patients most likely to benefit from immunotherapy. (2019-06-03)
Vitamin D could help cancer patients live longer
Michigan State University physicians have found that vitamin D, if taken for at least three years, could help cancer patients live longer. (2019-06-03)
New evidence: It's not necessary to fast before complete cholesterol test
A large study led by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Imperial College provides robust evidence that nonfasting lipid levels were similar to fasting lipid levels in the same individuals, predicting cardiovascular risk just as well. (2019-05-28)
Reinvent Motherisk to protect mothers and babies
Canada should reinvent the Motherisk program to support pregnant women to have healthy babies, argues an editorial in CMAJ. (2019-05-27)
Life-threatening genetic cholesterol condition could be found through blood donations
Blood donation programs represent a unique opportunity as a public health portal to screen for diseases. (2019-05-22)
New method could shed light on workers' historical radiation exposure
Researchers in the UK have developed a new method for evaluating plutonium workers' historical internal radiation exposure in a study funded by the National Institute for Health Research. (2019-05-21)
Diabetes complications soar in the US, but not Canada, as teenagers become young adults
A new study finds that hospitalizations for diabetic ketoacidosis rise sharply as adolescents transition to adulthood in the US, but not in Canada. (2019-05-08)
HIV epidemic stubbornly persists despite proven tool to prevent spread
A new survey of more than 200 Internal Medicine residents indicates that more than half rated their knowledge of a proven medication to prevent the spread of HIV as only poor or fair. (2019-05-08)
Feeling valued, respected appear most important for job satisfaction in academic medicine
A survey of physicians in the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Medicine finds that feeling valued, being treated with respect and working in a supportive environment were the factors most strongly associated with job satisfaction. (2019-05-06)
Regenstrief faculty discuss communication and patient advocacy at national meeting
Regenstrief Institute research scientists are presenting some of the institute's latest research on patient engagement and advocacy at the Society of General Internal Medicine Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., May 8-11. (2019-05-06)
Medical costs create hardships for more than half of Americans
A new study by American Cancer Society researchers finds more than half of people in the US report problems with affordability, stress, or delaying care because of medical costs (2019-05-02)
Internal waves induced by sequential typhoons transmitted with different frequency
The interaction of near-inertial internal waves (NIWs) excited by sequential typhoons are rare phenomena, but in a new study pointed out that internal waves induced by sequential typhoons transmitted with different frequency. (2019-04-24)
Stressed, anxious? Ask the brain!
Our actions are driven by 'internal states' such as anxiety, stress or thirst -- which will strongly affect and motivate our behaviors. (2019-04-23)
Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes are at risk of giving birth prematurely
Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of delivering their baby prematurely. (2019-04-23)
Group decisions: When more information isn't necessarily better
Modular -- or cliquey -- group structure isolates the flow of communication between individuals, which might seem counterproductive to survival. (2019-04-21)
Primary care services account for a small share of Medicare spending, study finds
Some states including Oregon and Rhode Island have begun adopting minimum primary care spending goals because health system orientation toward primary care is associated with higher quality, better outcomes and lower costs. (2019-04-15)
First-year doctors spend almost 90% of their time away from patients
Largest study to date uncovers the reality of young doctors' lives in the hospital. (2019-04-15)
Eliminating routine but low-value preoperative tests for cataract surgery patients associated with cost savings
Eliminating routine but unnecessary procedures before people undergo cataract surgery has the potential to save costs and resources for hospitals serving lower-income patients. (2019-04-15)
One-two punch helps solve greatest unmet need in cardiology
Combining a high-fat diet with a drug that raises blood pressure gave UT Southwestern researchers a 'two-hit' model, like a one-two punch to heart failure. (2019-04-11)
Study links insurance coverage to access to hospital care
Compared to privately insured patients, individuals who lack insurance or use Medicaid are more likely to be transferred to another hospital after receiving initial treatment in the emergency department (ED). (2019-04-01)
Improving equity in global physician training
Large numbers of U.S. physicians and medical trainees engage in hands-on clinical experiences abroad where they gain skills working across cultures with limited resources. (2019-03-28)
Infections linked with an increased risk of developing Sjögren's syndrome
Individuals with a history of infection had a two-fold increased risk of developing Sjögren's syndrome in a Journal of Internal Medicine study. (2019-03-20)
Generic advice doesn't help patients drop pounds
When it comes to losing weight, doctors' messages to their patients can make a powerful difference, according to new research from Duke University. (2019-03-20)
Current training of physicians to care for LGBTQ individuals is falling short
Not enough is being done to prepare physicians to care for the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) patients. (2019-03-15)
Excessive hygiene promotes resistance to antibiotics
In Nature Communications, researchers from Graz in Austria present initial approaches to how the spread of antibiotic resistances can be prevented in hospitals. (2019-03-12)
Changes are needed in teaching medical residents how to communicate patient handoffs
End-of-shift handoffs are complex interactions influenced by many factors, and changes need to be made to prepare medical residents to successfully execute the transitions. (2019-03-07)
Study: More than one-third of patients risk major bleeding by doubling up on blood thinners
A new study finds patients were taking too many antithrombotics for no reason, leading to a significant increase in bleeding events. (2019-03-04)
BFU scientists learned how to manage the properties of amorphous microwires
Amorphous ferromagnetic microwires are thin glass coated wires used to manufacture magnetic safety tags and in medicine. (2019-03-01)
Mindfulness could promote positive body image
Making people more aware of their own internal body signals, such as heartbeat or breathing rate, could promote positive body image, according to new research published in the journal Body Image. (2019-02-28)
Student-led rheumatology interest group increases interest in field
A group of student and faculty researchers from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences published outcome of establishing Rheumatology Interest Group in the International Journal of Rheumatology. (2019-02-26)
Fat cells work different 'shifts' throughout the day
Fat cells in the human body have their own internal clocks and exhibit circadian rhythms affecting critical metabolic functions, new research in the journal Scientific Reports, finds. (2019-02-25)
International medical graduates care for Medicare patients with greater health care needs
A study by a Massachusetts General Hospital research team indicates that internal medicine physicians who are graduates of medical schools outside the US care for Medicare patients with more complex medical needs than those cared for by graduates of American medical schools. (2019-02-19)
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